• Trump dumps insults on questioners, insists on control

    Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For Donald Trump, the joy of the insult seems as compelling as the art of the deal. Whether his challengers are fellow presidential candidates, the press or others, they are, according to Trump: incompetent, weak, pathetic, disgusting, idiots or the like. He described Democratic presidential contender Martin O'Malley, for example, as acting "like a disgusting, little, weak, pathetic baby." So far in the rollicking 2016 presidential contest, the billionaire businessman is showing little willingness to dial down his because-I-said-so style to suit the conventions of political campaigns — where the voters are the ones making big hiring and firing decisions. Trump is used to controlling his world like

  • TV station balances grief, journalism after on-air shooting

    Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    Alison Parker and Adam Ward's colleagues at TV station WDBJ saved their tears for off the air. The news became personal for the CBS affiliate in Virginia when reporter Parker and cameraman Ward were fatally shot during a live broadcast Wednesday morning, forcing co-workers to balance the stunning tragedy with professionalism. Their grief was evident during the newscasts that followed, but so was their restraint. "This is a hard day for all of us here at WDBJ7. We are mourning Alison and Adam, but it is our job to find the facts," anchorwoman Melissa Ganoa said during the 5 p.m. EDT newscast, less than 12 hours after the shooting by a fired station employee, Vester Flanagan, who died later of a self-inflicted gunshot wou

  • Slain TV reporter, cameraman were budding young journalists

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    ROANOKE, Va. (AP) — They were two young journalists, eager and hungry for a story, fulfilling their dreams of working in TV news. Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, grew up in the Roanoke, Virginia, area and started their television careers there, becoming local celebrities in the process and finding love along the way. On Wednesday, the two were following their passion when they were gunned down by a disgruntled former reporter they once worked with at WDBJ. The shots rang out in the middle of a live story about the 50th anniversary of a reservoir known as Smith Mountain Lake. The attack was captured on Ward's camera.

  • Fired reporter kills 2 former co-workers on live TV

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    MONETA, Va. (AP) — He planned it all so carefully — a choreographed execution of two former colleagues, broadcast live to a horrified television audience. Hours later, he shared his own recording of the killing worldwide on social media. Vester Lee Flanagan's video shows him approaching WDBJ reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward, gun in hand, as they conduct an interview. He points the gun at Parker and then at Ward, but he waits patiently to shoot until he knows that Parker is on camera, so she will be gunned down on air. TV viewers heard about the first eight of 15 shots. They saw Parker scream and run, and heard her crying "Oh my God!" as she fell.

  • Experts: Trump, Ramos confrontation shouldn't be a surprise

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump's onscreen confrontation with Univision's Jorge Ramos on Tuesday over the Republican presidential candidate's immigration plan should only be a surprise to those who don't know Ramos. The 57-year-old news anchor has a history of sharply questioning politicians and not hiding his opinions. Days before a security guard forced Ramos out of Trump's Iowa news conference on Tuesday — he was later let back in and continued a contentious exchange — he had denounced Trump on CNN. Ramos said the immigration issue "is personal" and when Trump voices his views that include mass deportations and revoking the citizenship of children born in the U.S. to undocumented parents, "he's talking about me" and all the o

  • Trump says he's proud he booted Univision's Ramos from event

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    PENSACOLA, Florida (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Wednesday he's proud of kicking one of the country's best-known Spanish-language journalists out of an Iowa news conference — the latest in a series of clashes with the media. "I think I handled that well. I got a lot of credit for it," Trump boasted to conservative radio host Laura Ingraham a day after his bodyguards escorted Univision's Jorge Ramos out of the event. The latest spat for Trump comes as his rivals continue to grapple with how best to compete against the unpredictable billionaire businessman, who has skyrocketed to the top of summertime polls. At a campaign event Wednesday in Pensacola, Florida, former Florida Gov.

  • MSNBC ending Sharpton's daily show

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Al Sharpton is losing his daily show on MSNBC, with the network saying he'll be downshifted to the weekend. Sharpton's "Politics Nation" has aired at 6 p.m. EDT on weeknights for the past four years at the ratings-challenged news network. MSNBC is in the midst of wholesale changes under NBC News boss Andrew Lack, deemphasizing its left-leaning programming during the daytime hours in favor of more straight news shows. Sharpton's show occasionally put MSNBC in awkward positions, since he continued his political activism while doing some stories where there was racial controversy while remaining host of a news program. MSNBC said Wednesday that starting Oct. 4, Sharpton's "Politics Nation" will air at 8 a

  • Dish and Sinclair agree in principle on new contract

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Dish Network and Sinclair Broadcast Group, one of the largest TV broadcasters in the U.S., said Wednesday they've agreed on the outline of a new contract, one day after Sinclair's channels went dark for Dish customers. Dish Network said signals for the Sinclair channels are being restored. The Federal Communications Commission said the deal ends one of the largest blackouts ever. The companies said Wednesday they've agreed in principle to a long-term deal and will extended their current contract by two weeks while they finalize terms. The sides didn't disclose further details of the new arrangement. Cable and satellite TV companies negotiate with channel owners over issues including how much to pay for

  • Don Orsillo out as Red Sox's TV announcer after season

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    BOSTON (AP) — Don Orsillo is out as the Boston Red Sox's television play-by-play voice after this season. Orsillo wasn't offered a new contract with NESN, and will be replaced by Dave O'Brien. Orsillo first broadcast Red Sox games on NESN in 2001 and became the full-time play-by-play man in 2005 when the network acquired rights to all local telecasts. "Don is an outstanding broadcaster, and we are grateful for all of his contributions to NESN's telecast over the years," NESN President and CEO Sean McGrail said in a statement. "On behalf of everyone at NESN and the Boston Red Sox organization, we would like to extend our sincere appreciation to Don.

  • Josh Duggar in rehab after admitting to pornography habit

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Days after he confessed to cheating on his wife and an addiction to pornography, Josh Duggar has entered rehab. The ex-reality star checked himself into a long-term treatment center, according to his parents, Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar. Their announcement Wednesday on the family's website did not specify the nature or duration of treatment, nor did it identify the facility. But the statement spoke of "a long journey toward wholeness and recovery." "We pray that in this he comes to complete repentance and sincere change," his parents said, adding they are "deeply grieved" by his actions, which have "brought great insult to the values and faith we hold dear.

  • Despite risk, live shots a staple of TV news

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Live shots are a staple — often ridiculed — of television news that have become more risky in recent years even before a Virginia reporter and cameraman were shot and killed on the morning news on Wednesday. Experts don't expect the live shots' ubiquity to change much, however. "The reason stations do them is because all of their research tells them that viewers respond to live," said Deborah Potter, executive director of the think tank NewsLab. A reporter on scene at a boisterous demonstration or out in a crippling snowstorm is undeniably exciting TV.

  • Details on WDBJ, 2 slain journalists

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    A few details on WDBJ and the two TV journalists who were slain Wednesday morning as they reported a news story: — An estimated 40,000 viewers were tuned to WDBJ when the on-air shootings took place. — WDBJ serves the southwest and central part of Virginia. It is one of several stations in the Roanoke-Lynchburg media market, ranked the nation's 67th largest, reaching about 450,000 households. A CBS affiliate, the station first signed on in 1955. Its website displays about two dozen on-air personnel in its news department. In all, the station employs about 50 people. —WDBJ is owned by the privately held Schurz Communications of South Bend, Indiana, whose properties include nine other TV stations as well as 13 radi

  • Sheriff: Suspect in shooting of reporter, cameraman died of self-inflicted gunshot wound

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    MONETA, Va. (AP) — Sheriff: Suspect in shooting of reporter, cameraman died of self-inflicted gunshot wound.

  • Official: Suspect in shooting of reporter, cameraman during live broadcast dies at hospital

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    MONETA, Va. (AP) — Official: Suspect in shooting of reporter, cameraman during live broadcast dies at hospital.

  • A quaint rite: Harvesting broadcast's fall crop of new shows

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — If there's a dominant trend in TV today, it's this: There's too much TV, even too much good TV, for any viewer to absorb, much less support. Even so, as the five major broadcast networks usher in their new fall 2015 offerings against the scores of rival broadcast, cable and streaming video outlets, some things never change. Like medical shows. This fall will see the arrival of three more: "Code Black" (CBS, premiering Sept. 30), a latter-day "ER" that's even busier and bloodier; "Chicago Med" (NBC, Nov. 20), the third dose of producer Dick Wolf's latest trilogy that also includes "Chicago Fire" and "Chicago PD"; and "Rosewood" (Fox, Sept. 23), which, starring Morris Chestnut as a beefcake Miami pathologist,

  • When you sample fall's new TV fare, here are some tips

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Every new TV series is a leap of faith — for everyone involved. For network bosses, who buy and schedule the show based only on a pilot episode and a fuzzy notion of what will follow. For each show's creative team, who make it up as they go along. For its actors, who typically sign on for as much as seven seasons after reading no more than the first script. And, of course, for its viewers, who, week to week, can only trust that the show will keep holding their interest. Unlike movies or almost any other art form, a TV series isn't a self-contained thing (at least, not until the final episode has aired). Until then, it exists as a work-in-progress, an unfolding relationship between the people wh

  • Dr. James 'Red' Duke, once-familiar TV doctor, dead at 86

    Updated: Tue, Aug 25, 2015

    HOUSTON (AP) — Dr. James "Red" Duke, a trauma surgeon who attended to Texas Gov. John Connally on the day of the Kennedy assassination before going on to become a familiar television doctor, died in Houston on Tuesday at age 86. In a statement, Dr. Richard Andrassy, surgery department chairman at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, said Duke died of natural causes at Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, where he was on staff. "He was with family at Memorial Hermann. He was not in pain. He will be missed very much by all of us at UT Medical School and Memorial Hermann," Andrassy said. Duke treated Connally's wounds in November 1963, after the governor was shot while riding in the car in which Pre

  • Trump has Univision anchor removed from new conference

    Updated: Tue, Aug 25, 2015

    DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump engaged in a prolonged confrontation with the anchor of the nation's leading Spanish-language network during a news conference Tuesday, first having the well-known news personality removed before allowing him back in. Jorge Ramos, the Miami-based anchor for Univision, stood up and began to ask Trump about his immigration proposal, which includes ending automatic citizenship for infants born in the United States to parents in the country illegally. As Ramos began to speak, Trump interrupted him, saying he hadn't called on Ramos before repeatedly telling him to "sit down" and then saying, "Go back to Univision.

  • Women's ski gear pitch wins Reno 'Shark Tank'-style contest

    Updated: Tue, Aug 25, 2015

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — The judges included Lt. Gov. Mark Hutchison instead of billionaire investor Mark Cuban, and they took a lighter touch with nervous contestants. But organizers hope a Nevada business pitch competition styled after "Shark Tank" helps give promising entrepreneurs the same kind of boost as the hit reality TV show. Ten entrepreneurs made the hard sell to Hutchison and a panel of business leaders Tuesday during the Governor's Conference on Business, fielding skeptical questions about their marketing plans and adding a touch of bravado to their two-minute pitches before the buzzer cut them off.

  • Fox News chief: Donald Trump owes Megyn Kelly an apology

    Updated: Tue, Aug 25, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Fox News chief Roger Ailes said Tuesday that Donald Trump owes the network's Megyn Kelly an apology for an unprovoked Twitter attack that "is as unacceptable as it is disturbing," but Trump isn't backing down. The Republican presidential front-runner-turned-TV-critic had welcomed Kelly back from a vacation Monday night by tweeting that he liked her show better while she was away. Trump said Kelly "must have had a terrible vacation" because "she's really off her game." He retweeted a message that referred to her as a bimbo. "Megyn Kelly represents the very best of American journalism and all of us at Fox News Channel reject the crude and irresponsible attempts to suggest otherwise," said Ailes, the Fox News C




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