• Hackers force message on websites via US firm

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A U.S. firm that helps connect more than 700 companies with customers through social media says a Syrian group hacked the company's web address to upload a message to other websites. Gigya CEO Patrick Salyer outlined what happened in a blog published Thursday. At around 6:45 a.m. Eastern Time, the company discovered "sporadic failures with access to our service," Salyer wrote. The executive said hackers had rerouted Internet traffic from Gigya's website to an outside computer server. That server generated a message to visitors that their site had been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army. Published reports noted the message appeared on websites for several UK newspapers, CNBC and the National

  • Producers: Pipeline not a cure-all for rail delays

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota farmers are nearing the end of a record corn harvest this week, but they have serious concerns about grain prices, storage options and rail congestion heading into spring. And they're looking for more options than the Keystone XL pipeline to help. The proposed pipeline became emblematic during election season as a cure-all to the railway backups and delayed grain shipments that peaked this year thanks to trains transporting oil. But it remains on hold after being narrowly defeated this month in the U.S. Senate.

  • Creed frontman Scott Stapp says he's broke

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Creed frontman Scott Stapp says he's broke. The 41-year-old lead singer of the Grammy-winning band said in a rambling 15-minute-long video posted on his Facebook page Wednesday that he's living in a hotel. "Right now, I'm living in a Holiday Inn, by the grace of God, because there's been a couple of weeks where I had to live in my truck," he said in the video. "I had no money, not even for gas or food." Stapp said money has been stolen from his bank account and royalty payments have not been paid to him. "Eight weeks ago, I began an audit of not only my record company, but my personal finances," he said. "During the course of that audit, a lot of things were uncovered.

  • Diplomats make trade deal to cut red tape, poverty

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    GENEVA (AP) — After many years of talking, the World Trade Organization pulled off a major deal Thursday that the body said could boost global commerce by $1 trillion annually. Diplomats said the deal is the first multilateral trade agreement in the organization's 20-year history. Agreement has been difficult to reach because WTO deals require the unanimous backing of its 160 member countries. "Once in force, it will help developing countries better integrate into the global economy, intensify regional integration and lift millions out of poverty," said European Union Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevedo said the deal is now operational but will come into force once two-thirds of

  • Ferguson gives thanks after a quiet night

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Protesters in Ferguson pressed pause Thursday as the city welcomed Thanksgiving, decorating boarded-up storefronts with some Dr. Seuss inspiration and gathering for church services — a stark contrast to previous days of outrage over the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case. No police officers or Missouri National Guard members stood sentry outside the Ferguson police station, which has been a nexus for protesters since Monday night's announcement that Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, who is white, wouldn't be indicted for fatally shooting the unarmed black 18-year-old in August.

  • Expectant mom struck by car dies; baby born alive

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — A pregnant woman sitting outside a drugstore died when an elderly driver trying to park jumped the curb and pinned her against the wall, police said. Doctors delivered her nearly full-term baby, who police said was in critical condition Wednesday night. A hospital spokeswoman said Thursday that no information about the child would be released. The victim, 30-year-old Jodie Guthrie, had been sitting outside a Rite Aid on the city's North Side on Wednesday afternoon when an 88-year-old motorist pulled into a parking space, authorities said. The driver might have hit the gas instead of the brake, police said, causing his minivan to lurch out of the parking space and onto the walkway where Guthrie sat.

  • For some, location of Brown's hands irrelevant

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — The word spread within minutes of Michael Brown's death — a young black man with his hands raised in surrender had just been shot by a white cop. Soon, "Hands Up. Don't Shoot!" became a rallying cry for protesters in the streets of this St. Louis suburb and a symbol nationwide of racial inequality for those who believe that minorities are too often the targets of overzealous police. Yet the witness accounts contained in thousands of pages of grand jury documents reviewed by The Associated Press show many variations about whether Brown's hands were actually raised — and if so, how high. To some, it doesn't matters whether Brown's hands literally were raised, because his death has come to symbo

  • LAPD: Arrested protesters to be released by dinner

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Demonstrators who can't make bail after being arrested during Los Angeles protests linked to the Ferguson police shooting will be released in time for Thanksgiving dinner, police said Thursday. About 90 people remained in jail after being arrested late Wednesday, and those who weren't able to pay the $500 bail were to be released on their own recognizance, LAPD Commander Andrew Smith said. A total of 338 people were arrested over three days during protests in Los Angeles, including 145 on Wednesday. Those with outstanding warrants or who were arrested on suspicion of a felony will not be released, but those taken in for disturbing the peace and failure to disperse — both misdemeanors — will be f

  • Green Mountain Power: electricity restored to most

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    COLCHESTER, Vt. (AP) — Here's a sign that the Thanksgiving-eve storm hit hardest in southern Vermont. As of mid-Thanksgiving afternoon, Vermont's largest power company says its remaining outages are centered in the southeast corner of the state. Kristin Carlson of Green Mountain Power says about 550 customers remained without power as of Thursday afternoon, down from more than 15,000 the previous evening. Those customers were concentrated in Vernon and Guilford. Vermont largely dodged the bullet, compared to its neighbors. More than 200,000 New Hampshire utility customers lost power at the peak of the storm, while more than 100,000 did in Maine.

  • OPEC keeps oil output on hold despite low prices

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    VIENNA (AP) — Reflecting its lessening oil clout, OPEC decided Thursday to keep its output target on hold and sit out falling crude prices that will likely spiral even lower as a result. Oil prices fell sharply on the news. Even though the decision was largely expected, it showed the once-powerful cartel is losing the power to push up markets to its own advantage. OPEC has traditionally relied on output cuts to regulate supply and prices. But it appeared to realize Thursday that with cheap crude in oversupply, a reduction would only cut into OPEC's share of the market without a lasting boost in prices and with others outside the cartel making up the difference.

  • Lawmakers may decide Uber's place in Nevada market

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Uber Technologies' legal battle with Nevada's highly regulated taxi industry over Internet ride-sharing may be headed back to the political arena now that a judge has at least temporarily banned Uber's unlicensed operations statewide. Whether his restraining order put the brakes on an unregulated transportation service, or pulled the plug on emerging technology, is one of the questions lawmakers may be left to decide if Uber can't persuade state regulators to find a way to marry its virtual world with the real one on the Las Vegas Strip and the streets of Reno. Uber says it's the victim of overzealous enforcement of antiquated laws that never envisioned smartphones that could "e-hail" transportation on dem

  • Liver transplant recipient marks 25th anniversary

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    SEVERN, Md. (AP) — Alyssa Riggan hasn't dwelled on being the first person in the U.S. to successfully receive part of a liver from a living donor 25 years ago, a medical procedure that paved the way for routine live-donor transplants. The anniversary falls on Thanksgiving this year. Riggan was 21 months old when her mother, Teri Smith, donated more than a third of her liver to save her daughter from a disorder called biliary atresia. Its success has enabled her to live a normal life, almost completely untouched by what was an often-fatal disorder. "Most of the time, I didn't think about it," Riggan, 26, said in an interview this week at her home in Severn, Maryland, noting her good health has enabled her to enjoy ballet and

  • Obama's action fuels worry about immigration scams

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Advocacy groups barely waited for President Barack Obama to finish speaking about sweeping changes to the U.S. immigration system to start warning about scams. "We hear horror stories about people getting taken advantage of horribly," attorney Ginger Jacobs told several dozen people who watched the president's speech at Alliance San Diego offices. California Attorney General Kamala Harris and Mexican consulates sounded similar alarms after Obama promised executive action that is expected to shield about 5 million people from deportation. For decades, immigrants have fallen victim to attorneys and consultants who disappear with their money or give bad advice that may land them in deportation proceedings.

  • US cathedral may become museum to the slave trade

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A plan to open what would be the nation's only museum centered on the trans-Atlantic slave trade would focus on the Episcopal Church's role in its history and the sometimes-buried legacy of slavery in northern states like Rhode Island. The museum at the shuttered Cathedral of St. John, a church where slaves once worshipped, would explore how the church benefited from the trade and helped bring it to an end, said Bishop Nicholas Knisely of the Diocese of Rhode Island. "Our story's mixed," he said. "We haven't talked in the country about the role of religion and religious voices in abolition and the slave trade.

  • Hawaii road re-opens amid stalled lava flow

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — Hawaii County's civil defense director is asking motorists not to stop on a newly reopened road in a rural town to get a look at lava that has stalled less than 500 feet away. A section of Pahoa Village Road that closed last month as lava threatened to cross it was re-opened Wednesday. Lava from Kilauea volcano crossed a country road in Pahoa last month and residents braced for it to cover Pahoa Village Road, which goes through downtown. But the lava has been stalled for several weeks. Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira says the hardened lava is on private property. While the lava's leading edge remains stalled, the civil defense agency says breakouts upslope remain active

  • Some power restored, over 200,000 out at peak

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Utilities are making some progress with power restoration efforts after the first snowstorm of the season left more than 200,000 customers without electricity in New Hampshire. By Thursday afternoon, Public Service of new Hampshire reported more than 167,000, down from over 170,000 overnight Many are in central and southern New Hampshire. Unitil said it had about 15,700 customers without power, down from a peak of 31,000. Most are in the Concord area. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op reports more than 15,000 without power and Liberty Utilities reports 450 without power.

  • Death penalty sought for Nigerian child bride

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    KANO, Nigeria (AP) — The father of a 14-year-old child bride accused of murdering her husband said Thursday he was appealing to a Nigerian court to spare his daughter the death sentence. Wasilat Tasi'u is on trial for the murder of her 35-year-old husband, Umar Sani, who died after eating food that Tasi'u allegedly laced with rat poison. "We are appealing to the judge to consider Wasilat's plea," her father, Isyaku Tasi'u, told The Associated Press on Thursday. On Wednesday witnesses told the High Court in Gezawa, a town 60 miles outside Nigeria's second largest city of Kano, that Tasi'u killed her husband two weeks after their wedding in April. Three others allegedly died after eating the poisoned meal.

  • A glance at Ferguson: Then, now and the future

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Thanksgiving started quietly in Ferguson, following protests Wednesday night that drew the smallest crowd since a grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer in the death of Michael Brown, a black 18-year-old. ___ THE LATEST: Community members decorated boarded-up windows Thursday, and some went to a church service where prayers were said for the family members of Brown and Darren Wilson, the white Ferguson officer who shot the unarmed Brown during a struggle Aug. 9. Meanwhile, a few cars drove through downtown St. Louis on Thursday morning for what the organizer called a "pro-community" car cruise.

  • For 600 migrants, harrowing sail ends in Greece

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    IERAPETRA, Greece (AP) — Hour after hour, the coast guard boats shuttled from the crippled freighter to a concrete pier, discharging a steady flow of humanity: Families with small children, black-clad elderly women, battered-looking youths with backpacks. For nearly 600 migrants, most of them fleeing the conflict in Syria for Europe, the harrowing journey on a smuggling ship that broke down in gale-force winds ended Thursday in the southern town of Ierapetra on the Greek island of Crete. The Baris cargo ship lost engine power Tuesday in international waters, and limped into Ierapetra at sunrise after being slowly towed for 40 hours by a Greek navy frigate.

  • New Jersey nuclear plant to test sirens on Tuesday

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — The nation's oldest operating nuclear plant plans to test its emergency sirens next week. Tuesday's test by the Oyster Creek plant is part of a twice-yearly safety drill. A similar test was staged in June, shortly after the plant's parent company had replaced all 42 emergency warning sirens in the 10-mile radius around the Lacey Township plant. The new units feature battery backup. The test will take place around 10 a.m. The purpose of the sirens is to notify residents to tune to a radio or television station in case of an emergency. Oyster Creek is located about 60 miles east of Philadelphia. It generates enough electricity to power 600,000 homes, or roughly all the homes in Monmouth