• John Nash, wife, 'A Beautiful Mind' inspiration, die in NJ

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — John Forbes Nash Jr., a mathematical genius whose struggle with schizophrenia was chronicled in the 2001 movie "A Beautiful Mind," has died along with his wife in a car crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. He was 86. Nash and Alicia Nash, 82, of Princeton Township, were killed in a taxi crash Saturday, state police said. A colleague who had received an award with Nash in Norway earlier in the week said they had just flown home and the couple had taken a cab home from the airport. Russell Crowe, who portrayed Nash in "A Beautiful Mind," tweeted that he was "stunned." "An amazing partnership," he wrote. "Beautiful minds, beautiful hearts.

  • Navy says submarine being built to be named USS New Jersey

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — A submarine will be the third U.S. Navy vessel named the USS New Jersey. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced Sunday that a submarine being built now will get that name when it's completed and commissioned in about five years. U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez had been pushing for a ship to be named after his state. On Sunday, he appeared with Mabus at the announcement in Jersey City. "This is a great day for the Navy and a great day for New Jersey," Menendez said. "We are honored to have our state's name added to the proud fleet of Virginia Class submarines." Menendez noted that the first modern submarine was designed and built in New Jersey. The Holland VI was made in Elizabeth and launched in 1

  • YouTube's 1st decade shows sharing free content pays off

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — YouTube's legacy extends beyond its pioneering role in the Internet's video revolution. The 10-year-old site provided a stage for exhibitionists, narcissists and activists to broadcast their opinions, show off their talents, expose abuses or just pass along their favorite clips of movies, TV shows, music, cute kittens and other interests. The rampant sharing on YouTube quickly attracted a massive audience that loved watching what they wanted when they wanted, even if much of the material was being contributed by amateurs. YouTube's rapid rise demonstrated that influential media hubs could be built around free content supplied by an Internet service's users.

  • Iconic filmmaker John Waters to receive honorary degree

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — When the Rhode Island School of Design offered iconic filmmaker John Waters an honorary degree, he was surprised. After all, he got thrown out of every school he ever went to. Known for quirky films that push the boundaries of good taste, including 1972's outrageous cult classic "Pink Flamingos," Waters is the keynote speaker at the prestigious art school's commencement next weekend. Waters will also receive an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree; recipients are chosen by the RISD community, and nominations are reviewed by a committee of students, faculty and staff. "I don't even know if I got a high school diploma. It's very peculiar.

  • Q&A: Boston Pops maestro Keith Lockhart on music, tech

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — Keith Lockhart was just 35 and a musical wunderkind when he took over as conductor of the Boston Pops in 1995. Now in his 20th season, Lockhart has raised his baton 1,700 times to lead the group nicknamed "America's Orchestra." Along the way, he's shared the stage with more than 250 guest artists as diverse as Aerosmith, Robert DeNiro and Big Bird. The Associated Press caught up with Lockhart in his office at Symphony Hall, dominated by a well-worn Hamburg Steinway piano that once belonged to Russian composer Serge Koussevitzky. Animated and fast-talking, the now 55-year-old maestro — free of his trademark tuxedo in a blue polo shirt and jeans — talked about the late B.B.

  • After a decade online, YouTube is redefining celebrity

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — It's a meet-and-greet worthy of an A-list star. Outside the three-story bookstore at the outdoor shopping mecca known as The Grove, hundreds of mostly young women have formed a line that stretches past trendy clothing stores and spills out onto a nearby street. They're waiting to have Connor Franta, an affable 22-year-old Internet personality best known for delivering diary-like monologues on YouTube, sign a copy of his new memoir. The irony of a YouTube star drawing a massive crowd at a bookstore isn't lost on talent manager Andrew Graham. "A year ago, I went to New York and tried to get a book publisher to take a meeting with me," said Graham, who represents Franta and other mega-popular YouTubers

  • AP Was There: Muhammad Ali-Sonny Liston heavyweight rematch

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    EDITOR'S NOTE: On May 25, 1965, Muhammad Ali defeated Sonny Liston in the first round of a heavyweight bout that produced one of the strangest finishes in boxing history as well as one of sports' most iconic moments — photos of Ali hovering over Liston on the canvas, shouting at his opponent to get up. After the fight, the 23-year-old Ali called the punch that dropped Liston his secret: "It was a phantom punch." "It was lightning and thunder — fast as lightning and booming as thunder from the heavens," Ali said. Liston, who was a slight favorite going into the fight, said afterward that when he got up, he thought the fight was still on. "No, I didn't hear the count," said Liston, who lost on a 12 count accordi

  • High-profile votes, fights preview Wolf's challenges in June

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — June is crunch time in the state Capitol and the challenges in front of Gov. Tom Wolf are becoming clearer in the Democrat's first go-round with budget negotiations. For Wolf, who took office in January, it will be perhaps the biggest test yet of his mettle, and an important sign of how successful he will be the rest of his term in persuading the state Legislature's huge Republican majorities to support his priorities. The last few days provided something of a preview of the battles awaiting Wolf's administration and how it might handle them.

  • Cleanup of oil spill at ND farm to take 2 more years

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The state Health Department says cleanup of a pipeline rupture that caused more than 20,000 barrels of crude to ooze across a northwestern North Dakota wheat field will take twice as long as the company had expected. The massive spill from a Tesoro Corp. pipeline that was discovered by a Tioga farmer in September 2013. The spill has been called the worst in state history. Tesoro had said the spill would take two years to clean up. State environmental scientist Bill Suess says it's now estimated to take at least four years. Tesoro says more than 6,000 barrels of oil have been recovered. Suess says the rest is being baked out of the soil. Tesoro blames a lightning strike for causing the ruptu

  • Crime caper kingpin Dashiell Hammett papers home at U of SC

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A literary treasure trove from the creator of iconic crime mysteries such as "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Thin Man" is finding a home at the University of South Carolina. University officials say it is the largest compendium known to exist of letters, photos, publications and books by the late Dashiell (Dash-EEL) Hammett. It will be available to scholars and students within a year. Hammett was a high-school dropout who popularized detective fiction in the 1920s and 1930s with stories of gritty gumshoes and wily dames. Scholars argue his work elevated crime stories to literary masterpieces. The collection is composed of items from the author's family and Hammett biographer Richard Layman.

  • Forgotten for decades, fallen NY soldier finally honored

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — An Air Force veteran is seeking public recognition for a western New York man who remains listed as missing in action more than 70 years after disappearing in the Philippines during World War II. Carroll (KEHR'-uhl) Heath wasn't well-known among his fellow 1940 graduates of Gowanda High School. He enlisted in the Army the next year and was in the Philippines when the Japanese invaded in December 1941. Heath was later declared as MIA by the U.S. military, but his name wasn't among those listed on the town's WWII memorial. Gowanda native Alan Mesches (MESH'-ihz) of Texas learned about Heath from his father, Heath's classmate.

  • Journalism students aim to dispel myths about veterans

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — Wishing living U.S. military veterans a "Happy Memorial Day" might be well-intentioned but misses the mark on an occasion meant for remembering those who lost their lives. That and other timely reminders can be found in a new book researched and written by a Michigan State University journalism class with assistance from former servicemen and women. "100 Questions and Answers About Veterans" is aimed at clearing up myths and misunderstandings held by some civilians. "A day of mourning doesn't square with 'happy,'" instructor Joe Grimm said. "They're thinking, 'I'm still here. My day is coming in November (on) Veterans Day.'" The book, available in print and digital versions, is the eighth that Grimm's c

  • Aging Catholic nuns get care at Jewish nursing home

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Three orders of Roman Catholic nuns that traditionally took care of their own aging sisters have sent 58 members to live at an elderly-care complex that was originally a nursing home for Jews. The orders' decision reflects a trend that has left the church in America with more nuns over age 90 than under age 60. Very few women are going into the religious life, while health care needs are escalating for those who joined earlier. The nuns are ages 73 to 98. They appear to have overcome some initial resistance and say they're very happy at Jewish Home Lifecare. They have taken over a couple of floors so they can be together, but they're also taking part in open-to-all activities. The home says they've bee

  • A sampling of efforts to fight blight in Appalachia

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    Efforts to rehabilitate vacant or dilapidated property have sprung up around Appalachia, with states in the region taking varying approaches. While it's common for big cities to have efforts to fight urban blight, it's less common to find extensive networks aimed at remedying abandoned or dilapidated buildings in small towns or rural areas. Below is a sampling of efforts toward abandoned and dilapidated buildings in the Appalachian region. ___ WEST VIRGINIA: Brownfields Assistance Centers at two universities assist local governments with vacant commercial and industrial sites, and the state's Land Bank Program was set up to take such properties off towns and counties' hands.

  • Catholics organize to promote pope's climate change message

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — There will be prayer vigils and pilgrimages, policy briefings and seminars, and sermons in parishes from the U.S. to the Philippines. When Pope Francis releases his much-anticipated teaching document on the environment and climate change in the coming weeks, a network of Roman Catholics will be ready. These environmental advocates — who work with bishops, religious orders, Catholic universities and lay movements — have been preparing for months to help maximize the effect of the statement, hoping for a transformative impact in the fight against global warming. "This is such a powerful moment," said Patrick Carolan, executive director of Franciscan Action Network, a Washington-based advocacy group formed

  • Navy divers to help raise confederate warship artifacts

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The Navy is preparing to send one if its premier diving teams to Georgia to help salvage a Confederate warship from the depths of the Savannah River. Before it ever fired a shot, the 1,200 ton ironclad CSS Georgia was scuttled by its own crew to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union army took Savannah in December 1864. Today, it's considered a captured enemy vessel and is property of the U.S. Navy. The shipwreck is being removed as part of a $703 million project to deepen the river channel so larger cargo ships can reach the Port of Savannah. Before the harbor can be deepened, the CSS Georgia has to be raised.

  • Politics in paradise: Alabama governor mansion in disrepair

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    GULF SHORES, Ala. (AP) — With boarded-up windows, peeling paint and a rooftop tarp that flaps in the ocean breeze, the beachfront retreat at the end of Gulf Way Drive is a $1 million eyesore in paradise. Odd as it may seem, this pricey dump is Alabama's coastal governor's mansion. And it has been falling apart for nearly two decades because of government inaction. The state has been unwilling to repair the house since it was damaged by a hurricane 18 years ago. Officials also have refused to return the land to the developer who donated the property for a gubernatorial retreat in 1962. So there sits the mansion, vacant and deteriorating a little more each day.

  • Northeast marinas scramble to repair damage from deep freeze

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    GLASTONBURY, Conn. (AP) — The deep freeze that gripped the Northeast last winter dealt a severe blow to marinas and yacht clubs: Ice snapped pilings in half, shredded wooden docks and left behind wreckage that many compare to the effects of a hurricane. After a scramble to get ready for the all-important Memorial Day weekend, most marinas are back in business, although many are behind schedule and still in need of costly repairs to operate at full capacity. Mindy Kahl, co-owner of Birbarie Marine on a river in Branford, Connecticut, said it is operating this weekend but nowhere near where it should be. Hardest hit were yards in rivers and coves that became choked with ice during a record-breaking stretch of frigid wea

  • Light on NC solar industry focused on ending preferences

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's rapidly-growing solar industry has an unwanted spotlight upon it from a cadre of fiscal conservatives at the General Assembly fixed on ending its preferential tax and energy policy treatments. "It's very simple: do you believe in subsidizing a special interest off the backs of our taxpayers or not?" Rep. Chris Millis, R-Pender, a fierce critic of the state's solar policies, asked colleagues during a recent debate. Millis and like-minded Republicans are in a full-court press this year to freeze portions of a 2007 law that are raising over time the percentage of retail sales that electric utilities must originate from renewable energy sources and energy efficiencies, reaching 12.5 percent

  • Nobel-winning mathematician John Nash, wife, portrayed in 'A Beautiful Mind,' killed in crash

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Nobel-winning mathematician John Nash, wife, portrayed in 'A Beautiful Mind,' killed in crash.




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