• Report: Man climbed atop basketball hoop in escape

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A physically fit inmate who was a known flight risk escaped from a central Arizona jail by hoisting himself atop a basketball hoop, grabbing on to an overhead security fence and breaking it apart, according to an investigative report released Monday. No one was directly supervising the recreation yard when Wade Cole Dickinson escaped July 12 while awaiting transfer to a state prison, the Yavapai County Sheriff's Office said. He remains at large, with the U.S. Marshals Service recently joining the hunt for him. The report suggests Dickinson's classification as a medium-security inmate and his fitness level played a major part in his ability to flee the Camp Verde jail.

  • Officials: Little risk of Ebola outbreak in US

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. The Centers for Disease Control on Monday sent a health alert to U.S. doctors about the outbreak. There are no travel restrictions to the West Africa region hit by the disease. But last month, the CDC issued a mid-level travel advisory for health workers. Two American aid workers in Liberia have tested positive for the virus and are being treated there. The family of one worker — a doctor — recently returned to the U.S. for a visit. The CDC said they are fine. Officials stressed people are not contagious until they show symptoms, and the doctor's family lef

  • Man charged in teen's 9-month disappearance

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire man was arrested Monday and charged with kidnapping 15-year-old Abigail "Abby" Hernandez more than nine months ago sometime after she left Kennett High School in Conway. Nathaniel Kibby, 34, was arrested without incident at his Gorham home, about 30 miles north of where the girl lives, and was charged with felony kidnapping, authorities said. Police allege Kibby knowingly confined Abby, then 14, on Oct. 9, sometime after she left school to walk to her home in North Conway. Abby returned home the night of July 20, but authorities have not explained the circumstances of her return.

  • Conservation group appeals San Diego power plant

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A conservation group is challenging a proposed natural gas power plant in San Diego. The Protect Our Communities Foundation filed a petition with the 4th District Court of Appeal on Monday asking it to overturn the California Public Utilities Commission's approval of the plant. The state commission voted unanimously earlier this year to approve it despite concerns from environmentalists. The plant's supporters say it is particularly needed because the San Onofre Nuclear power plant went offline last year. Opponents say the approval undermines the state's commitment to green energy and will cost taxpayers $1.6 billion during its first 25 years. The plant would be in Otay Mesa, about 20 mile

  • Obama mulls large-scale move on immigration

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as they grapple with an immigration crisis at the border, White House officials are making plans to act before November's mid-term elections to grant work permits to potentially millions of immigrants who are in this country illegally, allowing them to stay in the United States without threat of deportation, according to advocates and lawmakers in touch with the administration. Such a large-scale move on immigration could scramble election-year politics and lead some conservative Republicans to push for impeachment proceedings against President Barack Obama, a prospect White House officials have openly discussed.

  • FBI: Man sent hundreds of hoax letters with powder

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    DALLAS (AP) — A North Texas man accused of sending more than 500 hoax letters that contained a white powder to schools, government offices, day care centers and other locations in the U.S. and around the world was arrested Monday, federal authorities announced. Hong Minh Truong, 66, made his initial appearance in Dallas federal court after he was arrested and charged in a criminal complaint with false information and hoaxes. "While it was determined that the mailings did not contain toxins or poisons, each incident required a field screening of the letter's contents, which cost taxpayer dollars and diverted first responder resources," Diego Rodriguez, special agent in charge of the FBI's Dallas office, said in a statement.

  • Slain family of 5 was murder-suicide, police say

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    SACO, Maine (AP) — A maintenance worker with financial problems killed his wife and three children with a shotgun, then committed suicide, over the weekend in what state police called one of the worst cases of domestic violence in Maine history, investigators said Monday. Joel Smith presented a friendly face at the 61-unit apartment complex where he worked. But he was having domestic and financial problems, and his wife told a family friend that he had recently threatened to kill himself, police said. The family had moved from Arizona about two years ago because of the sour economy, said Smith's mother, Jerys Caruthers-Thorpe, of Scottsdale, Arizona. "I know something had to have snapped because Joel never would have

  • Tornado rips off roofs, downs trees near Boston

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    REVERE, Mass. (AP) — A storm system that wreaked havoc across the eastern half of the U.S. spawned a tornado that ripped roofs off homes in suburban Boston, uprooted trees and forced businesses to close. The tornado, a rarity in Massachusetts, touched down in Revere, a coastal city of nearly 52,000 residents just north of Boston, on Monday morning. City officials said several people suffered minor injuries, including a baby who was in a car and was hurt by flying glass and an elderly woman who suffered cuts. "Given the magnitude of the storm, it's really a miracle that no one sustained more serious injuries," Mayor Daniel Rizzo said. The tornado was spawned by a powerful storm that moved through the Boston area shortl

  • US Court: Virginia marriage is for all lovers

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia's same-sex marriage ban was ruled unconstitutional on Monday in the first such decision by a federal appellate court in the South. "We recognize that same-sex marriage makes some people deeply uncomfortable. However, inertia and apprehension are not legitimate bases for denying same-sex couples due process and equal protection of the laws," Judge Henry F. Floyd wrote. The 2-1 ruling applies throughout the circuit that also includes West Virginia, Maryland, and the Carolinas, where the attorneys general split Monday on what they'll do next. Virginians voted 57 percent to 43 percent in 2006 to amend their constitution to ban gay marriage. Virginia laws prohibit recognizing same-sex marriage

  • Deal to improve veterans' health care costs $17B

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan deal announced Monday would authorize about $17 billion to help veterans avoid long waits for health care, hire more doctors and nurses to treat veterans and make it easier to fire executives at the Department of Veterans Affairs. An agreement announced by the chairmen of the House and Senate Veterans Affairs committees is intended to fix a veterans' health program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records covering up delays. The bill includes $10 billion in emergency spending to make it easier for veterans who can't get prompt appointments with VA doctors to obtain outside care; $5 billion to hire doctors, nurses and other medical staff; and about $1.5 billion to lease 27 n

  • Defense: Gov't suppressed evidence in Blackwater

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for Blackwater security guards said Monday that the government has suppressed evidence favorable to defendants who are on trial in the killings of 14 Iraqis in Nisoor Square in Baghdad. U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen says that "a series of innocent oversights" led to the problem. The defense team for the four former Blackwater guards says the suppressed evidence consists of photographs of eight spent shell casings that would fit an AK-47 — the weapon of choice used by insurgents as well as Iraqi authorities. Attorneys for the four guards say insurgents fired on the Blackwater convoy and that the guards returned fire in self-defense. A court filing by the defense attorneys says a U.S.

  • Report says surveillance is hampering journalists

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Revelations over the past few years about how U.S. security officials have the ability to track people through phone, email and other electronic records are making it harder for journalists to report on what the government is doing, two human rights groups say. Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union said in a report issued Monday that access to data as detailed in leaks by former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden, coupled with the Obama administration's prosecution of people for leaking classified information, is having a chilling effect on reporters.

  • White House: EU, US to impose new Russia sanctions

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and European Union plan to impose new sanctions against Russia this week, including penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy, the White House said Monday. The show of Western solidarity comes as the U.S. accuses Russia of ramping up its troop presence on its border with Ukraine and shipping more heavy weaponry to pro-Moscow separatists in eastern Ukrainian cities. President Barack Obama and the leaders of Britain, Germany, France and Italy discussed the crisis during a rare joint video teleconference on Monday. The discussion follows days of bilateral talks on how to implement tougher sanctions after the downing of a passenger jet in eastern Ukraine, an attack the U.S. says

  • Mining deaths on rise, 22 in first half of 2014

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Twenty-two miners were killed in accidents during the first half of 2014, compared to 18 for the same period last year and 19 in 2012. The U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration on Monday released its mid-year summary of fatal accidents. The report shows eight coal miners died in the first half of the year. Fourteen workers in other types of mines — including gypsum, silver and gravel — were killed. The accidents included miners who were pinned or crushed by heavy equipment. Others fell or were struck by falling objects. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health Joseph A. Main said in a statement that the fatalities are preventable.

  • Rule aims to help clear air around Grand Canyon

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The largest coal-fired power plant in the West will produce one-third less energy by 2020 and could close in 2044 under a proposal that the federal government adopted to cut haze-causing emissions of nitrogen oxide at places like the Grand Canyon. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday that the owners of the Navajo Generating Station could either shut down one of the plant's 750-megawatt units or reduce power generation by an equal amount by 2020. The owners would have until 2030 to install pollution controls that would cut nitrogen-oxide emissions by 80 percent. The power plant near Page on the Navajo Nation would close in 2044 unless the tribe opts to take over the operation.

  • US teen held in Israel after arrest at protest

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is confirming that a 15-year-old American citizen is being held by Israeli authorities for his alleged role in protests earlier this month in East Jerusalem. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Monday that considering his age, the U.S. is calling for a speedy resolution to the case of Mohamed Abu Nie. Psaki (SAH'-kee) says he's been held since being arrested on July 3 on various charges alleging that he threw rocks, attacked police, was carrying a knife and was leading protests linked to the ongoing unrest between Israel and Hamas (huh-MAHS'). Psaki says the U.S. also is concerned about allegations that he might have been beaten while in custody. The U.S.

  • Police charge 2 men in fatal Philly carjacking

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Two men who carjacked a woman and sexually assaulted her in her SUV before plowing into a family selling fruit on a street corner, killing three children, were charged with murder on Monday, police said. Johnathan Rosa and Cornelius Crawford were each charged with three counts of felony murder and other crimes, police announced at a news conference. Police said they believe Rosa, 19, and Crawford, 23, forced a real estate agent into her sport utility vehicle on Friday, then took off at high speed. The three children, killed by the SUV crash about 15 minutes later, were siblings who had been selling fruit for a church fundraiser. Their mother was injured in the crash, as were a friend who was nearby and t

  • Lawmaker sorry he mistook US officials as Indian

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A freshman Republican lawmaker has apologized for mistaking two senior U.S. government officials as visitors from India when they testified at a congressional hearing. Rep. Curt Clawson caused puzzlement at a hearing of a House subcommittee hearing Thursday on U.S.-India relations. He referred to the South Asian nation as "your country" when he addressed the State Department and Commerce Department officials, both ethnic Indian. Clawson said in a statement Monday: "I made a mistake in speaking before being fully briefed and I apologize. I'm a quick study but in this case I shot an air ball." Clawson, former chief executive of an aluminum wheel company, won a special election in April to represent a d

  • Judge rules against Clippers owner Donald Sterling, OKs sale of team to ex-Microsoft CEO

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Judge rules against Clippers owner Donald Sterling, OKs sale of team to ex-Microsoft CEO.

  • House bill lets airlines advertise pre-tax fares

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a victory for airlines and their workers' unions, the House rejected consumers' complaints and easily passed legislation Monday letting airline advertising emphasize the base price of tickets, before taxes and fees are added. The bipartisan legislation would roll back federal regulations that since 2012 have required ads to most prominently display the full ticket price. Under the bill, the base price could be the figure most prominently shown in ads and ticket-selling websites as long as taxes and fees are displayed separately, such as in footnotes or pop-up ads. The measure was approved by voice vote, with individual lawmakers' votes not recorded.