• NYC's famed Carnegie Deli closed over gas line issue

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — New York's famous Carnegie Deli has been closed so utility workers can investigate a possible illegal gas hookup. A recording at the restaurant's phone number Saturday says it is closed for repairs related to the city's gas utility, Con Edison. But Con Edison spokesman Bob McGee says utility crews discovered a diverted line after investigating a gas leak. A stop-work order was posted Friday. Investigators from the city and the Manhattan district attorney's office have stepped up inspections of gas hookups since an explosion in the East Village killed two people on March 26. Authorities believe that blast may have been caused by someone improperly tapping a gas line.

  • Nearly 17 million watch Jenner interview

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Former Olympian Bruce Jenner reached an audience of just under 17 million people for his declaration in an ABC News interview that he identifies as a woman. The Nielsen company said Saturday 16.9 million viewers watched the interview on ABC's "20/20" newscast Friday night. The audience was the biggest for a non-sports show on a Friday night since 2003, which would exclude Olympics broadcasts. Friday is generally a light night for television viewing because so many people have plans outside the house. It was also the biggest audience for ABC's "20/20" newscast on a Friday night in 15 years. Nielsen said viewership peaked just after 10 p.m. with 17.2 million viewers.

  • Bruce Jenner comes out as transgender, says 'I am a woman'

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Former Olympian Bruce Jenner reached an audience of just under 17 million people for his declaration in an ABC News interview that he identifies as a woman. The Nielsen company said Saturday it was the biggest audience for a non-sports show on a Friday night since 2003, which would exclude Olympics broadcasts. Friday is generally a light night for television viewing because so many people have plans outside the house. It was also the biggest audience for ABC's "20/20" newscast on a Friday night in 15 years. Nielsen said viewership peaked just after 10 p.m. with 17.2 million viewers. Nielsen Social also estimated that there were 972,000 tweets sent Friday night about the Jenner interview.

  • Appalachian nonprofit links small farmers with big grocers

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    DUFFIELD, Va. (AP) — In Virginia's southwestern tip lies a produce aggregator that's become a standout success among Appalachian nonprofits by helping farmers in remote areas sell to big grocers. Appalachian Harvest has grown to a $1.5 million business that derives only a sliver of its budget from grants while delivering vegetables to grocers including Whole Foods, Ingles and Food City. To develop its business from scratch, Appalachian Harvest has fine-tuned how it helps farmers while expanding from organic to conventional crops and learning a crash-course in trucking. Inside Appalachian Harvest's 15,000 square-foot warehouse are massive coolers and packing equipment, including a 30-foot green conveyor belt-driven mac

  • ND Legislature misses goal of adjourning session early

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The North Dakota Legislature has missed its goal of finishing its work five days before the constitutional 80-day limit. Monday is Day 76. Lawmakers had hoped to bank five days so that they could return to the Capitol to address additional impacts from oil price swings. The session opened in January with 853 measures. Data from the Legislative Council, the Legislature's research arm, show 31 bills awaited action late Friday. In the penultimate week before session's end, lawmakers dealt with likely the most contentious bills of the session.

  • Coyote collared after lower Manhattan police chase

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A wily coyote is no match for the NYPD. Police collared the creature near a sidewalk cafe in downtown Manhattan on Saturday morning. The coyote was spotted shortly after 7:30 a.m. in the Battery Park City neighborhood. Officers tailed her up and down a marina and a Hudson River park for about an hour before using a tranquilizer dart to subdue her. She is being cared for at the Center for Animal Care and Control. Police say there were no injuries to humans or animals. It is unclear if the coyote was the same one that was spotted in Riverside Park on Wednesday. At least four coyote sightings have been reported in Manhattan this year.

  • Another condemned Ala inmate claiming innocence

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Anthony Ray Hinton, who spent 28 years on Alabama's death row for two murders despite his claims of innocence, walked free earlier this month after prosecutors admitted they couldn't prove his guilt. Another inmate who maintains he was wrongly convicted in a separate killing is now challenging his death sentence in a case with eerie similarities to Hinton's, down to allegations of botched ballistics evidence, a questionable eyewitness identification and the judge and prosecutor who handled both trials.

  • Appalachian nonprofit links small farmers with big grocers

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    DUFFIELD, Va. (AP) — In Virginia's southwestern tip lies a produce aggregator that's become a standout success among Appalachian nonprofits by helping farmers in remote areas sell to big grocers. Appalachian Harvest has grown to a $1.5 million business that derives only a sliver of its budget from grants while delivering vegetables to grocers including Whole Foods, Ingles and Food City. To develop its business from scratch, Appalachian Harvest has fine-tuned how it helps farmers while expanding from organic to conventional crops and learning a crash-course in trucking. Inside Appalachian Harvest's 15,000 square-foot warehouse are massive coolers and packing equipment, including a 30-foot green conveyor belt-driven mac

  • Michigan vote tests pothole angst vs. will to raise taxes

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Drivers in the state that put the world on wheels are flat-out embarrassed by the state of Michigan's roads, and some are even scared. But whether they can stomach tax increases to improve the roads is in doubt. A May 5 ballot measure proposes a 1-cent sales tax hike to put an additional $1.2 billion a year into fixing deteriorating roads and bridges. Michigan and some other states have been asking voters to decide whether to raise taxes or shift revenue to pay for road needs no longer fully covered by fuel taxes. The problem is particularly acute in Michigan, which spends less on highway infrastructure, per capita, than any other state except Georgia and is a major trucking route to and from C

  • Man who shot himself outside courthouse during sex case dies

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    BRENTWOOD, N.H. (AP) — Authorities say a New Hampshire man has died after shooting himself in the courthouse parking lot while awaiting a jury's verdict on charges he sexually assaulted a piano student more than a decade ago. Seventy-five-year-old John Goodwin went on trial this week on six counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault involving a former student. The jury began deliberating the case Friday morning, about two hours before Goodwin shot himself near his car outside the Rockingham County Superior Courthouse in Brentwood. The longtime piano instructor in Atkinson was airlifted to a Massachusetts hospital. The Rockingham County sheriff's office said Saturday that Goodwin died of his injuries.

  • Japan's views of WWII history rankles some US veterans

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lester Tenney endured three years as a Japanese prisoner during World War II, but he has made peace with his former enemy. Yet as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prepares to address Congress on Wednesday, in the 70th anniversary year of the war's end, something rankles Tenney about Japan's attitude toward its past. "They don't want the young people to know what really happened," complains Tenney, now 94. The Associated Press spoke to three U.S. war veterans about their surrender in the Philippines in 1942 and their exploitation as slave laborers in Japan. It's an episode of history most notorious for the Bataan Death March, when tens of thousands of Filipino and American POWs were forced 65 miles on foo

  • 'Saigon has fallen' _ a reporter's view of Vietnam War's end

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    (EDITOR'S NOTE — More than two decades of war in Vietnam, first involving the French and then the Americans, ended with the last days of April 1975. Peter Arnett, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of combat for The Associated Press and later gained fame as a CNN correspondent, has written a new memoir, "Saigon Has Fallen," about his dozen-plus years reporting on Vietnam. Arnett has recounted this period before but approaches it with a fresh perspective for the 40th anniversary of the war's end. The book is published by RosettaBooks in partnership with The Associated Press (www.ap.org/books). This is an edited excerpt, focused on the war's final throes.) ___ Artillery explosions sound a fearsome 4 a.m. wake-up call,

  • Bill under debate would limit farm antibiotics in Oregon

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon legislators want to curb the use of antibiotics in agriculture, joining a national movement concerned that germs are becoming more resistant and causing infections in human. Proponents of an Oregon bill say the practice of farmers routinely feeding antibiotics to livestock to fatten it up and protect it from illnesses is contributing to the spread of superbugs. If the legislation passes, Oregon would be the first in the nation to mandate stricter rules on livestock antibiotics. Some farmers and veterinarians say the bill would limit them from using antibiotics to prevent disease outbreaks.

  • Liberty University at a glance

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — The late Rev. Jerry Falwell recognized the importance of accreditation, academics and athletics when he founded what is now Liberty University in 1971, his son Jerry says. Perhaps like any upstart in a field where its competitors date themselves by centuries, not decades, the younger Falwell is quick to list the achievements of a school he has overseen since 2007. Here's a sampling: — Its net assets have grown from $100 million in 2000 to more than $1.4 billion. — Tuition is in the lowest 25 percent of all private schools. — The student loan default rate is half the national average. — The debate team has claimed an armful of national titles and has been a giant slayer, beatin

  • Public boarding school _ the way to solve educational ills?

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Buffalo's chronically struggling school system is considering an idea gaining momentum in other cities: public boarding schools that put round-the-clock attention on students and away from such daunting problems as poverty, troubled homes and truancy. Supporters say such a dramatic step is necessary to get some students into an atmosphere that promotes learning, and worth the costs, estimated at $20,000 to $25,000 per student per year. "We have teachers and union leaders telling us, 'The problem is with the homes; these kids are in dysfunctional homes,'" said Buffalo school board member Carl Paladino.

  • University founded in Va. by culture warrior Falwell soars

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — The president of Liberty University credits his father, the late Rev. Jerry Falwell, for laying the foundation for the extraordinary growth of the evangelical Christian university. Located in the foothills of Virginia's Blue Ridge mountains, Liberty now claims more than 100,000 students, with most of that number reflecting distance learners. The younger Jerry Falwell says that makes Liberty the largest university in Virginia. That's a far cry from the little Baptist college that his father started in Lynchburg in 1971. President Falwell says Liberty's growth has even surprised him. The university is amid a $500 million campus building boom on its 7,000-plus acre campus.

  • As theater shooting trial opens, gun debate dwindles

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — When a gunman opened fire inside a packed movie theater in July 2012, killing 12 and injuring 70, it did more than spread fear and heartbreak across the Denver suburbs. It helped revive the national debate over gun control. The debate gained intensity in the state five months later when a gunman killed 20 children and 6 adults at a Connecticut elementary school, resulting in Democrats to require universal background checks and ban magazines that hold more than 15 rounds. Gun control advocates boasted that they had found the formula to enact their policies in a libertarian swing state. Furious gun rights supporters recalled two state senators who supported the measures.

  • Owner spots his stolen truck in rearview mirror; arrest made

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    PIEDMONT, Ala. (AP) — A man driving to work in Alabama suddenly noticed his stolen pickup truck following him, setting off a chain of events that included a pursuit, a crash and an arrest. Calhoun County Chief Deputy Matthew Wade told WBRC-TV (http://bit.ly/1IVD8Xh ) a man called police Friday after noticing he was driving in front of the truck that had been stolen from him earlier that morning near Piedmont. Police attempted to stop the reportedly stolen vehicle, but the driver, 29-year-old Terry Proctor of Piedmont, did not stop, and a pursuit ensued. Wade said the driver crashed the vehicle and was ejected as the truck rolled over. Proctor was captured after a foot chase.

  • With legalization, lawyers turn to business of pot

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Lawyers and pot dealers have long intersected in criminal court, but as marijuana goes mainstream, attorneys have been working to keep sellers and growers legit. Marijuana divisions are popping up at law firms to advise pot shops on where they can locate, what their websites can say and how to vet new clients. "It's definitely something that established firms are dipping a toe into, though they are being very cautious, and rightly so," said Sam Kamin, a professor at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law who teaches a class about representing the marijuana industry. Kamin said the firms see marijuana as a lucrative new industry, but still worry about the potential ethical and legal pitfalls

  • AAA Mid-Atlantic: New Jersey gas prices rise sharply

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Motorists are seeing sharply higher prices at the pumps in New Jersey. AAA Mid-Atlantic says the average price of a gallon of regular gas in the state on Friday was $2.36, up 11 cents from last week. But that's still much lower than the price from a year ago, when motorists were paying $3.52. This marks the third straight week that pump prices have risen in New Jersey. The national average price on Friday was $2.51, up 8 cents from last week. But that's also much lower than the national average from a year ago, when motorists were paying $3.69. Analysts say the higher pump prices are mostly due to rising crude oil prices.




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