• Specially trained dogs help out farmers with disabilities

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    MAYSVILLE, Mo. (AP) — Farmers with disabilities often fear they'll be unable to continue their way of life. But a small group of dedicated volunteers is helping some disabled farmers with specially trained dogs. PHARM Dog USA — or Pets Helping Agriculture in Rural Missouri —trains border collies and other dogs to help with chores specifically tailored to a farmer's needs. The dogs also provide emotional support and companionship. The group currently operates on a shoestring budget in four Midwestern states. Founder Jackie Allenbrand hopes to someday expand nationwide. One client, Alda Owen, raises Angus cattle with her husband in northwest Missouri and is legally blind.

  • Indonesia extradites ex-police officer sought in US murder

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A former Austin, Texas, police officer has been charged with capital murder in the death of his pregnant girlfriend, according to a federal affidavit unsealed Wednesday. VonTrey Jamal Clark was extradited from Indonesia to the United States. He arrived at an Austin airport late Wednesday night, the Austin American-Statesman reported, and records show he was booked into the Bastrop County jail. The Bastrop County Sheriff's Office scheduled a news conference Thursday to discuss the case against him in the death of Samantha Dean, whose body was found in February behind a vacant shopping center. A federal arrest affidavit says a Bastrop County judge had sworn out a state arrest warrant July 21 chargin

  • AP survey: How cities are handling surge in oil trains

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    Mile-long trains carrying millions of gallons of crude have become a common sight in cities around the U.S., raising concern about the possibility of a catastrophic derailment near crowded neighborhoods or critical infrastructure. In the wake of a half-dozen fiery crashes this year, The Associated Press surveyed nearly a dozen cities with populations of more than 250,000 to gauge how prepared they are to respond to an oil-train derailment. Emergency officials in every city say they're aware of the threat and are taking steps to address it, but the level of preparedness differs from city to city. ___ BUFFALO, NEW YORK — City does not have an emergency plan that specifically addresses oil trains, but says it

  • 3 to be sentenced for rock throwing that injured teacher

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LEWISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Three young men will soon learn their sentences for a rock-throwing incident last year that caused severe brain trauma to an Ohio schoolteacher as she passed through Pennsylvania in the dead of night. A judge will decide Thursday what punishment is appropriate for Tyler Porter, Dylan Lahr and Keefer McGee for the July 2014 attack along Interstate 80 in central Pennsylvania. The victim, middle school language arts teacher Sharon Budd, is expected to be in court for the proceeding. A fourth man, Brett Lahr, already is serving 18 months to 20 years after pleading no contest to a conspiracy count. The nearly 5-pound rock crashed through the front windshield of the car in which Budd was riding,

  • In Alaska, Obama becomes 1st president to enter the Arctic

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    KOTZEBUE, Alaska (AP) — President Barack Obama crossed the Arctic Circle on Wednesday in a first by a sitting U.S. president, telling residents in a far-flung Alaska village that their plight should be the world's wake-up call on global warming. Obama's visit to Kotzebue, a town of some 3,000 people in the Alaska Arctic, was designed to snap the country to attention by illustrating the ways warmer temperatures have already threatened entire communities and ways of life in Alaska. He said, despite progress in reducing greenhouse gases, the planet is already warming and the U.S. isn't doing enough to stop it.

  • New Jersey guards information on oil trains in state

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    Trains regularly haul explosive crude oil to two New Jersey refineries, but state officials will not provide information about how often the trains run in the state. Most other state governments are providing such information through public records requests. New Jersey officials will say only which counties the trains pass through but not how many there are per week. The State Emergency Response Commission says the information is being guarded because of "security concerns." The trains originate in the Upper Midwest and travel through the majority of New Jersey's counties. Much of the crude is headed to refineries in Linden and Paulsboro.

  • Teens take on preservation work at national monuments

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    AT THE BOTTOM OF FRIJOLES CANYON, N.M. (AP) — A crew of Native American youth has spent the summer helping on a preservation project at Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico. The project is part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation's HOPE initiative, or Hands-On Preservation Experience. The trust teamed up with the National Park Service and the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps. The goal was to train more young people in preservation skills while helping historical sites on public land. From New Mexico and Arizona to Virginia and Vermont, crews worked on some 30 projects this summer. At Bandelier, the work has taken on a greater significance because the teens have been restoring structures that were built by t

  • The Latest: Heavy police presence near where officer shot

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    FOX LAKE, Ill. (AP) — The latest on the fatal shooting of a police officer in northern Illinois (all times local): 11:45 p.m. A county sheriff's spokesman says authorities are responding to a report of two "suspicious subjects" in a northern Illinois town near where a police officer was fatally shot. Lake County Sheriff's Sgt. Christopher Covelli says police officers with dogs are conducting systematic searches with air support Wednesday night in Volo. Covelli says there's no evidence the scene is connected to the shooting of Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz in nearby Fox Lake. But he says: "Given the circumstances, we're taking it very seriously.

  • Asian stocks rise amid China holiday, get Wall Street perk

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    Asian stocks rose Thursday after Wall Street rebounded from a sharp sell-off and as a holiday in China gave investors a break from its torrid markets. KEEPING SCORE: Japan's Nikkei 225 was up 1.4 percent to 18,350.85 and South Korea's Kospi gained 0.1 percent to 1,916.93. Stock markets in Southeast Asia also rose while Australia's S&P/ASX 200 shed 1.1 percent to 5,046.50. New Zealand's benchmark also fell. Taiwan's benchmark added 0.6 percent to 8,086.10. Markets were closed in China, which has suffered a dramatic slide since June, and Hong Kong. THE QUOTE: "With US stocks rebounding and mild gains from European markets, we could see some wind keeping Asian equities airborne today," said IG market strategist Bernard Aw in a c

  • Judge refuses to drop charges against police in Gray death

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — A Baltimore judge on Wednesday refused to dismiss charges against six police officers in connection with the death of a black man from injuries he suffered while in custody. The judge also refused to remove the prosecutor in the case. The death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray — who succumbed to injuries sustained after his arrest on April 12 — sparked protests, rioting and unrest that shook Baltimore for days. A demonstration Wednesday outside the Baltimore courtroom where a pretrial hearing on the charges took place attracted dozens, and resulted in just one arrest.

  • Redskins GM's wife apologizes for tweet about reporter

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — The wife of Washington Redskins general manager Scot McCloughan has apologized for "disparaging" and "unfounded" comments on her Twitter account about an ESPN reporter. The Redskins issued a statement on behalf of Jessica McCloughan on Wednesday night in which she acknowledged making the remarks, which said the reporter exchanged sexual favors for information. Jessica McCloughan's statement begins: "I deeply apologize for the disparaging remarks about an ESPN reporter on my personal Twitter account. The comment was unfounded and inappropriate, and I have the utmost respect for both the reporter and ESPN." That apology never mentioned Dianna Russini by name.

  • US officials mark 70th anniversary of WWII's official end

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — U.S. officials and veterans gathered on a decommissioned battleship in Pearl Harbor on Wednesday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War II's end. "It was not about retribution. Like today's ceremony, it was an acknowledgement that the shared losses of World War II vastly exceeded the immediate gains at the time," said Adm. Scott Swift, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, told a crowd of several hundred gathered on the deck of the former USS Missouri. The Missouri's decks are where Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and Army Gen. Yoshijiro Umezu signed documents to formally surrender on Sept. 2, 1945. The USS Missouri was anchored in Tokyo Bay at the time. Allied leaders inc

  • Obama's fish tale: salmon spawning on his shoes

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    DILLINGHAM, Alaska (AP) — This oh-my moment was nowhere on the official schedule for President Barack Obama's visit to Alaska: salmon spawning on his shoes. "You see that?" Obama declared Wednesday as he gripped a fish with two hands. "Something's got on my shoes. ... Generally you don't want fish spawning on your feet. He said the local fisherwoman who accompanied him said the fish was "happy to see me." Visiting an isolated fishing village on a grey, overcast day, the president was full of admiration for the whole operation: He pronounced salmon jerky "really good," tried unsuccessfully to scare up a knife so he could attempt to filet a fish and carefully inspected smokehouse drying racks.

  • 2 soldiers injured after Black Hawk helicopter hard landing

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    CASTLE ROCK, Colo. (AP) — Fort Carson says a Black Hawk helicopter landed hard in a suburban Denver forest in Douglas County, injuring two soldiers onboard. The military says it's investigating how the accident happened about 4:30 p.m. Wednesday on U.S. Forest Service land. Officials say four soldiers were in the helicopter during a routine training mission. Fort Carson spokeswoman Danny Johnson described the incident as a hard landing. The military said in a news conference that the injuries are not life-threatening. KMGH-TV reports (http://goo.gl/htDRdT ) that the Elizabeth Fire Department responded shortly after the accident but initially had trouble finding the helicopter in the forest.

  • State regulators accused of 'chummy' relations with utility

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Members of a powerful New Mexico regulatory body are too "chummy" with utility executives and should not be allowed to make decisions about the fate of a coal-fired power plant that serves customers around the Southwest, according to the latest pleadings of an environmental group. The Santa Fe-based New Energy Economy filed a motion late Wednesday with the Public Regulation Commission, seeking the recusal of four of the panel's five members. The motion hinges on 100 pages of exhibits that detail numerous emails and phone calls that make reference to private meetings, dinners, coffee dates and invitations to conferences and sporting events.

  • Vigil held for Illinois police officer nearing retirement

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    FOX LAKE, Ill. (AP) — Charles Joseph Gliniewicz was on the brink of retiring after a 30-year career in law enforcement. At 52, the tattooed police officer with a shaved head could still be tough and intimidating if the job called for it. But he also had a sweet side that endeared him to the suburban Chicago village he had served for decades, a place where he was a constant presence at community events and a role model. Now the people of Fox Lake are mourning the officer known affectionately as "G.I. Joe" after he detoured on his way to work to pursue three suspicious men into a swamp. He ended up with a fatal gunshot wound and died Tuesday. Hundreds of people gathered at a Fox Lake park late Wednesday for a vigil in memory

  • Police cruiser hit by gunfire, crashes, catches fire

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    MILLIS, Mass. (AP) — Police are looking for a gunman who fired at a police cruiser in a town southwest of Boston, and schools are being closed as a precaution. The police car crashed and caught fire Wednesday in Millis. The officer wasn't seriously hurt. Two threatening phone calls were made to a middle school earlier in the day. Police Sgt. William Dwyer says the events aren't believed to be related but investigators want to be sure. Schools are closed Thursday. Dwyer says a white man 25 to 40 years old fired at the officer from a maroon pickup truck driving in the opposite direction. He says the officer crashed when he spun around to try to follow the truck. Police had asked people to remain inside while they

  • Ex-corporal: Tulsa sheriff failed to act on deputy criticism

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma sheriff's corporal said Wednesday that the leader of the department should have taken action after an internal memo raised questions about the training and workplace behavior of a volunteer deputy who later fatally shot an unarmed man. Bill Adams, who left the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office in 2010 after clashing with supervisors, testified for about half an hour before a grand jury investigating the agency. Adams also said he turned over documents to jurors, but declined to comment on the nature of the information. Adams said before testifying that a leaked 2009 memo that questioned the competence of reserve deputy Robert Bates was "very accurate," and said Sheriff Stanley Glanz could have do

  • Oldest survivor of San Francisco earthquake of 1906 dies

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Ruth Newman was just a child living on an outlying ranch when the Great San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 struck, but her memory of that day never faded, her daughter said. "She would tell us she remembered my grandmother being upset because they had just milked the cow earlier and she had separated the cream and all and put it in containers that got thrown to the floor," said Newman's daughter Beverley Dodds, 85, of Fair Oaks, California. Newman was the oldest remaining survivor of the earthquake before her death earlier this summer. She was 113. Newman was 4 years old when the quake struck, shaking her home on a Healdsburg, California, ranch about 70 miles north of San Francisco the early morning

  • School drug counselors charged in $46 million fraud scheme

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Some were students who had tried drugs or alcohol, but didn't have substance abuse problems. Others were young addicts in need of help. Neither group necessarily fared well under counseling programs run by a Long Beach company for Los Angeles County schools, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Dabblers were dubbed abusers, and hard-core users didn't always get the care they needed. The students unwittingly helped the company take in $46 million in a decadelong health care fraud scheme that led to indictments unsealed Wednesday against eight women employees who managed the program, supervised counselors or worked with students.




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