• Tours on USS Arizona Memorial suspended after ship hits dock

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — Tours on the USS Arizona Memorial have been suspended indefinitely after a vessel struck and damaged the structure's dock Wednesday, the National Park Service said. Instead, boats were taking visitors to a spot in Pearl Harbor near the memorial where they can view it from a distance, said spokeswoman Abby Wines. "At this point it's not safe for visitors or anyone to land there and disembark at the memorial," Wines said. The crash occurred when the hospital ship USNS Mercy and a civilian tugboat contracted by the Navy were maneuvering in the harbor. Either the tugboat or the Mercy hit the dock, Wines said. The Navy and the Park Service said in a statement the incident was being investigated.

  • Judge considers best option for girl charged in stabbing

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — One of the two Wisconsin girls charged with trying to kill a friend to please a fictitious horror character would have her mental health issues better served in juvenile court, defense attorneys told a judge Wednesday. Waukesha County Circuit Judge Michael Bohren said he will issue a ruling Aug. 10 on whether the 13-year-old and her 12-year-old friend should be moved from adult court to the juvenile system. The 13-year-old had a two-day hearing that ended Wednesday, but Bohren said he will wait until after the 12-year-old's hearing on the same issue next month before making a decision. Defense attorney Maura McMahon told the judge the 13-year-old has shown remorse and needs the therapy that the juvenil

  • UAW rival at VW represented by 'union avoidance' expert

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The rival group to the United Auto Workers union at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee brands itself as local, independent and free of outside influence or political agenda. But the American Council of Employees won't divulge how it is funded, and the lawyer who recently filed the group's overdue disclosures with the U.S. Department of Labor touts his expertise in "union avoidance." ACE has 381 members among both hourly and salaried workers at the Chattanooga factory, according to the filing. By contrast, the UAW said last month it had 816 members among the hourly workers alone. That's about 55 percent of the blue-collar workforce.

  • Norway's king opens Arctic drilling conference in Alaska

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Norway's king opened a conference on Arctic offshore drilling Wednesday with a plug for incorporating his country's expertise into drilling off Alaska's northern shores. "Norway and Alaska have much to learn from each other and plenty to gain from increasing our economic collaboration in the Arctic, particularly in the oil and gas sector," King Harald V told industry representatives at the Arctic Offshore Operations Conference in Anchorage. The 78-year-old king, nearing the end of a seven-day U.S. trip and his first to Alaska, jumped in on an issue that has drawn bitter opposition from environmental groups. Drilling critics say oil companies have not demonstrated they can clean up major spills

  • Onstage at last: Memorable moments of National Spelling Bee

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    OXON HILL, Md. (AP) — An impressive field of 283 young spellers was narrowed to 49 semifinalists during Wednesday's preliminary rounds of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. The remaining spellers will compete on Thursday for more than $37,000 in cash and prizes. Among the semifinalists: Gokul Venkatachalam of Chesterfield, Missouri, who finished third last year. Gokul, a matter-of-fact speller who shows little emotion onstage, was one of three who got perfect scores on the preliminary spelling and vocabulary test. Also advancing to the semifinals were Vanya Shivashankar, a five-time participant and the younger sister of the 2009 champion; Srinath Mahankali, the younger brother of the 2013 winner; and Jairam Hathwar, whose o

  • Insurer to pay $300,000 in Michigan scared-to-death dispute

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — An insurance company has agreed to pay $300,000 to settle a lawsuit over the death of an 85-year-old man, ending an unusual dispute over whether the driver may have been literally scared to death before his car slammed into a tractor-trailer in suburban Detroit, court records show. Lawyers for the man's family got an opinion from a noted forensic pathologist, who said Abdulla Kassem's fatal heart condition could have been caused by a "fear of impending doom," just moments before the 2008 crash in Dearborn. "It's raining. It's bad lighting," Dr. Werner Spitz testified. "He doesn't see the truck. The truck is not visible. He comes to within inches of the back of the vehicle and suddenly — boom — he hits.

  • Hostage situation ends peacefully when suspect surrenders

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    ANTIOCH, Calif. (AP) — A carjacker surrendered peacefully Wednesday after releasing two hostages who were held in a tense standoff with police at a convenience store in Northern California, authorities said. The incident began when police in cruisers and helicopter chased a man in a stolen car until he crashed near the store then ducked inside as an officer fired a shot, Antioch police said. The man then took the two people hostage. Officers from multiple police agencies surrounded the building with guns drawn. One hostage was released and the other remained inside for another hour before the suspect agreed to surrender. He came out with his arms up, lay face down in the parking lot and was quickly handcuffed. N

  • 6 Baltimore officers charged in death seek to move trial

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Attorneys for six Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray are asking a judge to move their case out of Baltimore, arguing it will be impossible to select an impartial jury and receive a fair trial. The officers face charges ranging from assault to second-degree "depraved-heart" murder. Gray's death April 19 prompted a wave of protests that on two occasions gave way to violence. Shortly after charges were filed against the officers, the U.S. Justice Department announced that it would conduct an investigation of the city police department. In a lengthy motion filed Wednesday, the defense attorneys argued that a citywide curfew during the unrest created "an insurmountable prejudice

  • Beyond craft brews: Just like foodies, beer geeks go local

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — In a nondescript industrial park, beer geeks line up several times a week outside Bissell Brothers to get the latest batch of fresh beer — much like foodies seeking the freshest baguettes, pomegranates or kale. Jeremy Ritz didn't get the beer he wanted on a recent day because it was sold out. So he decided to buy some rye ale instead. "To me it's huge that I get talk to the guy who's brewing my beer," the middle school teacher said. "I love that." Bissell Brothers intends to make 3,200 barrels of beer this year. That's tiny compared to the big craft breweries, which are stretching the meaning of "craft" under Brewers Association guidelines that allow them to retain the claim at up to 6 million

  • Florida coasts have grown, but hurricane damage risk hasn't

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    MIAMI (AP) — Since eight hurricanes whipped through Florida during back-to-back seasons a decade ago, causing $33 billion in insurance claims, the state's coastal communities have added an additional 1.5 million people and almost a half-million new houses, an Associated Press analysis shows. But experts say the risk of catastrophic destruction hasn't grown along with the new development because Florida builders are doing a better job of making structures hurricane-resistant. The improvement derives from Florida's statewide building code, which was implemented in 2002, a decade after Hurricane Andrew's 165-mph winds gutted parts of South Florida.

  • Sanders wants Clinton to take stand on trade deal

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Sen. Bernie Sanders is questioning why Democratic presidential rival Hillary Rodman Clinton won't take a stand on the emerging trade deal with Pacific nations, which he calls "enormously important issue" she's been dodging. A day after launching his longshot campaign, the Vermont independent returned to neighboring New Hampshire on Wednesday, where a blunt voter told him she wants him to thrash Clinton in the primary race, not merely siphon some votes away from her. "Why can't we ask Hillary to give up her spot and give it to you?" Jeanny Aldrich of Chesterfield demanded. "I could be wrong, but I suspect she would disagree with you," Sanders quipped before saying he's never run a negative campaign and w

  • APNewsBreak: Feds probing powerful union for NY jail guards

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Federal investigators are looking into the financial records and other documents of the powerful union representing the city's 9,000 jail guards, the union's president and its law firm confirmed Wednesday to The Associated Press. Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara's office appears to be focusing in part on claims in a union official's lawsuit alleging the improper investment of union funds. Among the allegations in the lawsuit is that Correction Officers' Benevolent Association President Norman Seabrook made a risky $5 million investment into an unnamed hedge fund last year without union board approval.

  • FBI: Surveillance tools in jeopardy amid Patriot Act debate

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — As Congress wrestles over renewing the bulk collection of Americans' phone records, federal law enforcement officials are warning that legal authority is also at risk for lesser-known surveillance tools that are even more valuable in fighting terrorism. The Patriot Act authorities give the FBI flexibility to intercept the calls of terror suspects who continuously switch phones during the course of an investigation and to conduct surveillance on "lone wolf" individuals who pose threats but aren't affiliated with an international terrorism organization. U.S.

  • FCC takes aim at annoying telemarketing calls

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Those automated phone calls during the dinner hour, late at night or to your wireless phone can be so frustrating — and the government is taking note. The head of the Federal Communications Commission circulated a proposal Wednesday designed to close loopholes, reaffirm current anti-robocall rules, and encourage wireless and wireline carriers to do more to fight against unwanted telemarketing calls and spam text messages to consumers. A key part of the plan: clearing up any confusion over whether the phone carriers can offer blocking services — so-called robo-blocking technology that could help people stop the unwanted calls.

  • Review: Bujalski bulks up with a starrier cast in 'Results'

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    In Andrew Bujalski's directorial debut "Funny Ha Ha" — the film often cited as the first "mumblecore" movie — its aimless protagonist Marnie, recently graduated from college, writes a to-do list charming in its modest ambition: "Make friends with Jackie." ''Learn to play chess?" ''Fitness initiative!" Bujalski's last film crossed one of those off the list (the '80s-set black-and-white mockumentary "Computer Chess"), and now he has taken his characters to the gym. The fitness world, where Bujalski's latest, "Results," is set, might seem like the most unlikely place for the Austin-based indie director to turn; his scruffy, nerdy characters would probably only blink stoically if presented with a treadmill.

  • MDU customers in North Dakota to get electric bill refund

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota regulators say Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. customers will be getting a break on their electric bills over the next two months. North Dakota's Public Service Commission says MDU customers should see an average credit of $2.14 beginning with their June electric bill. The Public Service Commission says the credit is the result of an earnings sharing agreement MDU reached with regulators in August. The agreement requires MDU to return 50 percent of earnings that exceed the company's allowable return on investment. The Bismarck-based company will refund about $879,000 to customers for 2014.

  • Blues legend B.B. King honored with Memphis processional

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A Dixieland jazz band walked ahead of a slow black hearse and a crowd of thousands followed as the city of Memphis said farewell Wednesday to blues legend B.B. King with a tribute and processional down Beale Street. The street whose name is virtually synonymous with the blues is where a young, ex-sharecropper named Riley B. King was nicknamed the Beale Street Blues Boy — later shortened to B.B. — and where King rose to fame. The Memphis-based Mighty Souls Brass Band played "When the Saints Go Marching In." Behind them and just ahead of the hearse, drummer Rodd Bland — son of the late blues singer Bobby "Blue" Bland — carried one of King's signature "Lucille" guitars.

  • Police: Pair who rode with Wal-Mart gunman didn't know plan

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Two people who were in the car with a U.S. airman when he drove to a North Dakota Wal-Mart and opened fire inside the store in an apparently random shooting had no idea what he was about to do, police said Wednesday. Marcell Willis, 21, made up a reason to go to Wal-Mart around 1 a.m. Tuesday, Grand Forks Police Lt. Derik Zimmel said, and the two people with him stayed in the car while he went inside the Grand Forks store. Willis fatally shot one worker and injured another, both near the self-checkout area at the front of the store, then killed himself. Police have found no motive for the shooting, and Zimmel said the people who were with Willis also don't seem to know why he did it.

  • New York steps up crude-by-rail spill response, monitoring

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York's Department of Environmental Conservation says it's stepping up air monitoring at the Port of Albany and enhancing spill response capabilities along rail corridors to reduce health and environmental risks stemming from crude oil transport through the state. The measures announced by DEC Commissioner Joseph Martens on Wednesday have been advocated for several years by environmental groups and community residents along crude oil rail transport routes and near the Port of Albany, which has become a major hub for oil shipments. Martens said the DEC will develop geographic response plans and deploy specialized spill response equipment such as oil-absorbent booms and pumps along rail corridors used t

  • APNewsBreak: Records contradict claim in St. Louis baby case

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri adoption records contradict a St. Louis woman's claim that her baby was stolen at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in 1965 after she was told the newborn had died. The Associated Press obtained a letter dated May 21 from the juvenile division of family court in St. Louis, citing records stating that the biological mother abandoned the baby. The letter does not mention the biological mother's name, but Zella Jackson Price and her attorney say DNA tests confirmed she is the birth mother. Among other discrepancies, it said the child was born at a different St. Louis hospital, not Homer G. Phillips.




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