• Joey Chestnut devours turkey to win eating contest

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    MASHANTUCKET, Conn. (AP) — Competitive eater Joey Chestnut has won a turkey-eating contest in Connecticut, setting a record by devouring an entire bird. Ten contestants vied to see who could eat the most of a 20-pound turkey in a competition Saturday at Foxwoods Resort Casino. Chestnut ate 9.35 pounds of meat off the bone in 10 minutes. According to Major League Eating, the food equivalent of the NFL, he bested the previous record, which was held by Sonya Thomas, who ate 5.25 pounds of turkey in November 2011. Chestnut, a San Jose, California, resident who turns 31 on Tuesday, is ranked the top competitive eater in the world. He took home a $5,000 check after stuffing his face with turkey. The remainder of the $

  • 'Mockingjay, Part 1' opens with $123 million

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — "Mockingjay, Part 1" didn't catch fire like the previous installments of "The Hunger Games," but it still had the biggest opening of the year with $123 million at the weekend box office, according to studio estimates Sunday. Lionsgate's "Mockingjay" opened well below the $158 million debut of last year's "Hunger Games: Catching Fire" and the $153 million opening of the 2012 original. But even with a $30-million-plus slide in the franchise, "Mockingjay" far surpassed the previous top weekend of the year: the $100 million debut of "Transformers: Age of Extinction." The result made for some unusual ironies. The biggest opening of the year (and by a wide margin) was seen by some as a disappointment.

  • Man who ambushed cops had anti-government beliefs

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A man who set his house on fire and ambushed responding police officers held "anti-government, anti-establishment" views and had previously threatened law enforcement, authorities said Sunday. The gunman was identified as 53-year-old Curtis Wade Holley. Authorities said he fatally shot Leon County Sheriff's Deputy Christopher Smith, 47, on Saturday and wounded another deputy before he was killed in a gun battle outside his home. At a news conference Sunday, sheriff's Lt. James McQuaig wouldn't detail the nature of the previous threats or Holley's anti-government beliefs. Holley had lived at the end of a cul-de-sac in a middle class neighborhood for about a year, McQuaig said.

  • Former DC Mayor Marion Barry dies at 78

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A controversial and tireless advocate for the nation's capital who created jobs for generations of black families, Marion Barry was the ultimate District of Columbia politician, though his arrest for drug use in the midst of a crack cocaine epidemic often overshadows his accomplishments. The former four-term mayor will long be remembered for one night in 1990 when he was caught on video lighting a crack pipe in an FBI sting operation. In an instant, the then-mayor of the capital city was exposed as a drug user himself. Barry, 78, died Sunday at the United Medical Center after having been released from a hospital a day earlier. Barry died naturally of heart problems caused by high blood pressure, and his ki

  • Judge denies bid to halt Illinois fracking rules

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — A judge in southwestern Illinois has denied a bid by a landowners group to suspend the state's new rules for high-volume oil and gas drilling, ruling that the plaintiffs failed to show they would suffer immediate harm if the practice commonly known as "fracking" was to go forward. Madison County Circuit Judge Barbara Crowder rejected the request for a preliminary injunction on Friday, three days after she heard arguments about the rules meant to regulate hydraulic fracturing. Attorneys for the landowners had insisted that the rules drafted by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and approved Nov.

  • Forecasters issue tornado warnings as storms cross Georgia

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — The National Weather Service issued several tornado warnings as severe storms crossed Georgia early Sunday evening. At least two storms were moving northeast at roughly 65 mph from an area near Barnesville and 60 miles from the Forsyth area, forecasters said. One of the storms had dissipated as of roughly 5:15 p.m. while the second continued in the Jasper, Walton, Newton and Morgan county areas. An initial tornado warning Sunday afternoon covered an area near Columbus but the storm gradually moved northeast from there, prompting tornado and severe thunderstorm warnings in other areas as it moved east. The National Weather Service reported that heavy rain and high wind had knocked down trees and power li

  • Obama defends moves on immigration

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    HENDERSON, Nev. (AP) — President Barack Obama is shrugging off Republican criticism of his actions to lift the threat of deportation from millions of immigrants living illegally in the United States. In an interview broadcast Sunday on ABC's "This Week," Obama said it was important that he act unilaterally to prioritize the deportation of criminals and recent arrivals and spare those who have lived here illegally for at least five years and have roots, including children who are American citizens. "Why we would prefer a system in which they're in the shadows, potentially taking advantage of living here but not contributing?" Obama said in the interview, which was taped Friday in Las Vegas after Obama delivered an immigratio

  • NC likely to join legislative push on Uber, Lyft

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina has become an attractive market for smartphone-based car services such as Uber and Lyft, which are drawn to the state's mid-sized cities that have college students and young professionals but lack extensive mass transit. It's also one of many states where little regulation exists outside of traditional cab and limo services. Uber currently offers rides in 10 cities in North Carolina, ranging from Wilmington and Asheville to the larger Raleigh and Charlotte. The company says that's more than any other state but California. Six of those cities have populations greater than 200,000, and all are home to universities.

  • Marion Barry remembered for love of DC

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    Marion Barry, who served four terms as the mayor of the District of Columbia and served on the D.C. Council as the representative for the city's Ward 8 until his death Sunday at the age of 78, was remembered for his love for the city he served: ___ "Marion was born a sharecropper's son, came of age during the civil rights movement, and became a fixture in D.C. politics for decades. As a leader with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Marion helped advanced the cause of civil rights for all. During his decades in elected office in D.C., he put in place historic programs to lift working people out of poverty, expand opportunity, and begin to make real the promise of home rule.

  • Iowa farmers question proposed transmission line

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — A proposed 500-mile transmission line to carry electricity from wind turbines in northwest Iowa to customers in Illinois is encountering significant resistance from farmers and other landowners across the state. The Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier reports (http://bit.ly/1yIbgRt ) the proposed Rock Island Clean Line would cross 16 Iowa counties and 1,540 different properties. A group of more than 1,000 landowners in the region has organized the Preservation of Rural Iowa Alliance to oppose the project. Houston-based Clean Line Energy Partners is proposing the transmission line. The company's Beth Conley says even though Iowa won't receive energy from the line, the state will receive an economic boost

  • US tells Iran to consider nuclear talks extension

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    VIENNA (AP) — The U.S. told Iran Sunday that it's time to consider extending nuclear talks, in the first formal recognition by Washington that frenzied last-minute diplomacy may not be enough to seal a deal by a rapidly approaching deadline. A senior U.S. official said that with the Monday evening cutoff date a little more than a day away, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry proposed to Iranian Foreign Minister Mohamad Java Zarf that the two sides start discussing post-deadline talks in their latest meeting since Kerry arrived three days ago to add his diplomatic weight to the talks.

  • Evacuation plans readied as Buffalo flooding looms

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — First came the big storm, then the big dig. Now comes the big melt. Residents of flood-prone areas around Buffalo should move valuables up from the basement, pack a bag and prepare for the possibility of evacuation as up to 7 feet of melting snow posed the threat of flooding, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned Sunday. "Err on the side of caution," Cuomo said at a news conference in Cheektowaga. "You prepare for the worst and hope for the best, and that's what we're doing." Across the Buffalo region — where rising temperatures were expected to approach 60 degrees on Monday — people took that advice to heart.

  • Health care M&A leads global deal surge

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    In a big year for deal making, the health care industry is a standout. Large drugmakers are buying and selling businesses to control costs and deploy surplus cash. A rising stock market, tax strategies and low interest rates are also fueling the mergers and acquisitions. It's all combining to make 2014 the most active year for health care deals in at least two decades. The industry has announced about $438 billion worth of mergers and acquisitions worldwide so far, about 14 percent of the $3.2 trillion total for all industries, according to data provider Dealogic. Overall, M&A is on track for its best year since 2007, the year before the financial crisis intensified.

  • DA to dismiss ticket in wreck that killed family

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    MONROE, La. (AP) — A prosecutor says he is dismissing the ticket issued to a Texas teenager who apparently fell asleep at the wheel and caused a wreck that killed five members of his family as they were headed to Disney World. District Attorney Jerry Jones tells The News-Star (http://tnsne.ws/11pd4nb ) that the 16-year-old has been punished enough, and there's no need to add to his pain. KNOE-TV (http://bit.ly/1tdvpuN ) reports that Jones has dismissed the misdemeanor ticket for careless driving. State police say the sport utility vehicle veered off Interstate 20 in Ouachita Parish in Louisiana and flipped, ejecting six of the eight people in the car. Three children and two adults were killed.

  • Admiral denies role in counterfeiting casino chips

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — An admiral linked by Navy investigators to counterfeit casino chips denied Sunday that he played any role in making them. Investigation records say his DNA was found on the underside of an adhesive sticker used to alter one of the phony chips, but previously undisclosed emails indicate that the presence of his DNA is not conclusive evidence that he was involved in the fakery. Rear Adm. Timothy M. Giardina, who was fired last year as No. 2 commander of U.S. nuclear forces at an early stage of a Navy criminal investigation into the counterfeit chips, acknowledged to The Associated Press that he played the fake chips at a poker table in the Horseshoe Casino in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in June 2013.

  • Boy with fake gun dies after shot by Ohio officer

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    CLEVELAND (AP) — A 12-year-old boy shot by police after grabbing what turned out to be a replica gun died from his wounds Sunday, a day after officers responded to a 911 call about someone waving a "probably fake" gun at a playground. Deputy Chief Ed Tomba said one officer fired twice after the boy pulled the fake weapon — which was lacking the orange safety indicator usually found on the muzzle — from his waistband but had not pointed it at police. The boy did not make any verbal threats but grabbed the replica handgun after being told to raise his hands, Tomba said. "That's when the officer fired," he said. The Cuyahoga County medical examiner identified the boy as Tamir Rice.

  • Oklahoma City federal court collects more than $36 million in 2014

    By Matt Dinger, Staff Writer | Updated: 18 hr ago

    The total collected by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Oklahoma is $36,340,329.15, and includes court cases as well as asset forfeiture for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, spokesman Bob Troester said.

  • Timeline of events after death of Michael Brown

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — A timeline of key events following the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. ___ AUG. 9 — Brown and a companion, both black, are confronted by an officer as they walk back to Brown's home from a convenience store. Brown and the officer, who is white, are involved in a scuffle, followed by gunshots. Brown dies at the scene, and his body remains in the street for four hours in the summer heat. Neighbors later lash out at authorities, saying they mistreated the body. AUG. 10 — After a candlelight vigil, people protesting Brown's death smash car windows and carry away armloads of looted goods from stores.

  • Obama: Americans want 'new car smell' in 2016

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    HENDERSON, Nev. (AP) — President Barack Obama says voters want a "new car smell" in the 2016 White House race and that Hillary Rodham Clinton would be "a great president." But would Clinton pass that particular smell test? In a nationally televised interview broadcast Sunday, Obama seemed to suggest that any Democrat other than him would provide the turn of the page that he says voters are interested in. He acknowledged the "dings" to his own political standing during nearly six years of sometimes bruising battles with Congress and said Americans will want something new.

  • Rhodes scholars for class of 2015 announced

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Rhodes Trust says 32 U.S. men and women have been named Rhodes scholars and will enter Oxford University next October. The winners were selected from 877 applicants endorsed by 305 different colleges and universities. The scholarships, announced early Sunday, provide all expenses for two or three years of study at the prestigious university in England. This year's winners include a Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate who did economic research for the World Bank, the White House and the Affordable Care Act as well as a starting forward on the Yale basketball team majoring in molecular, cellular and developmental biology.