• George Lucas to Colbert: Why aren't you replacing Stewart?

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stephen Colbert came to the Tribeca Film Festival to interview filmmaker George Lucas, but the "Star Wars" creator had a question of his own. "The perfect choice to replace that Jon Stewart fellow would have been you," Lucas told Colbert on Friday. Why, he wanted to know, wasn't he replacing him? Colbert, who replaces David Letterman in September as host of "The Late Show" on CBS, tried to explain. "Trevor Noah is a very funny guy," he said of Stewart's recently named replacement. Moreover, he said, "I don't want to be the guy to take over from Jon Stewart. I worked for Jon Stewart at that show, and my memories will always be of him being the keenest, most intelligent, most beautifully deconstruc

  • Governor vetoes bill limiting state entity in gas plan

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Gov. Bill Walker vetoed legislation Friday that sought to temporarily restrict participation of a state-sponsored corporation in an alternate gas pipeline project that he proposed. The veto was expected, though Walker has had talks with House Speaker Mike Chenault and Senate President Kevin Meyer on whether there might be a way forward that would bring both sides a measure of comfort. No agreement had been reached, Walker spokeswoman Grace Jang said Friday. Any veto override would require the support of 40 of the Legislature's 60 members. Thirty-seven lawmakers voted to pass the bill, while 21 voted against; two House members were excused the day the vote was taken on that side last month.

  • Group wants to bring back Native Hawaiian burial traditions

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — A group of Native Hawaiians wants to bring back a centuries-old island burial practice that it says is more environmentally friendly than some modern interment methods. Traditional "clean burials" involve cleansing the deceased by fire in a pit and then compressing the skeletal remains, wrapping them in a cloth woven from trees, and burying them in a basket. Supporters note such burials use fewer chemicals and take up less space in cemeteries at a time when an aging population faces a limited amount of land. "We have a lot of elders who are concerned about having enough capacity to bury their families when it's time to go," said Mahealani Cypher, who represents the Koolau Foundation, which is pushing t

  • 2 arrests made in fatal shooting of university student

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A 22-year-old University of Kentucky student was shot and killed a block from the Lexington campus Friday morning in what police believe was a random robbery gone awry. Jonathan W. Krueger, a junior communications major and photo editor at the school newspaper, was shot in the chest about 2 a.m. while walking home from a party. Two Lexington men were arrested Friday. Justin D. Smith, 18, and Efrain Diaz, 20, were charged with murder and robbery. Smith was also charged with tampering with evidence and evading police. It was not known if they had attorneys. "This feels like a nightmare; it feels like everything has gone wrong," said Adam Pennavaria, Krueger's friend and colleague on the school new

  • Prosecutors in Md. charge man in Census Bureau guard's death

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    A man accused of killing a U.S. Census Bureau guard during a crime spree in and around the Washington, D.C., area has been charged with murder and other federal offenses, prosecutors said. Ronald Anderson was charged in a criminal complaint on Friday in the April 9 abduction, chase and gunfire that killed Lawrence Buckner. The charges include kidnapping, murder, using and discharging a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing death by use of a firearm during a crime of violence. The U.S. attorney's office said Anderson, 48, could face the death penalty if convicted. The criminal complaint offers details about what happened that differ from reports issued by police immediately following the chaotic crime spr

  • Advocate wants $648M payout for 'inappropriate' nuke talks

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two Southern California utilities should return at least $648 million to customers because of evidence of secret deal-making in a nearly $5 billion settlement following the closing of a nuclear power plant, a state agency said Friday. The Office of Ratepayer Advocates, an arm of the California Public Utilities Commission, said in a statement that private conversations between the commission's then-President Michael Peevey and a Southern California Edison executive gave the company an unfair advantage in negotiations over how to divide costs left behind by the now-defunct San Onofre plant. "These two individuals worked in secret to outline an acceptable financial settlement," the office said.

  • Court: Navajo presidential election cannot be held Tuesday

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A Navajo Nation judge has ruled that election officials cannot move forward with Tuesday's belated presidential contest, but the decision is likely to be appealed. Window Rock District Judge Carol Perry's ruling Friday centers on a bill tribal lawmakers passed earlier this year to fund a referendum that essentially would eliminate the Navajo-language fluency requirement for the tribe's top two posts. Perry said she knows Navajo voters and the presidential candidates have been affected greatly by a widespread debate over the role the tribe's language plays in politics and culture. But she said the bill is clear that the referendum must be held before Navajos choose their next leader.

  • The Latest: White House hopefuls gather in New Hampshire

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    8:30 p.m. (EDT) Sen. Marco Rubio, a Spanish speaker whose parents came to the United States from Cuba, says English should be the country's official language. But, he says, resources should still be available in school for students who don't speak English as a first language. After delivering a keynote speech Friday night at a two-day gathering of activists in New Hampshire, the Florida senator and newly declared presidential candidate took questions. One voter told Rubio that her daughter didn't get a job in Florida because she wasn't certified to teach English as a second language. The woman asked Rubio whether such policies wrongly enable non-English speakers to never learn English. Rubio says learning English is ess

  • Authorities remove 5 bodies from Phoenix home after shooting

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    PHOENIX (AP) — Authorities removed five bodies from a Phoenix home Friday where they say a man shot and killed his mother, two brothers and one of their wives before taking his own life. Police identified the shooter as 50-year-old Driss Diaeddinn, and investigators said he had been arguing with his brothers before the attack Thursday. "He had made some off-the-wall comments, at the time saying goodbye to people," police Sgt. Trent Crump said. "They didn't know what he was meaning at the time. But now in hindsight, they realize that he was just having some sort of a breakdown." The brothers — including victims Dodi Fayed, 56, and Reda Diaeddinn, 38 — ran a company that offered cars for hire and a restaurant, Crump

  • ESPN suspends reporter after insult-laced video surfaces

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — ESPN suspended reporter Britt McHenry on Thursday after a video surfaced of her insulting a towing company clerk's intelligence, job and appearance. ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said in a statement that McHenry has been suspended for a week. McHenry, a Washington-based reporter for the sports network since March 2014, turned to Twitter to apologize. "In an intense and stressful moment, I allowed my emotions to get the best of me and said some insulting and regrettable things," she tweeted Thursday. "As frustrated as I was, I should always choose to be respectful and take the high road. I am so sorry for my actions and will learn from this mistake." Advanced Towing Co.

  • Family wins back seized gold coins that could be worth $80M

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A family was awarded the rights to 10 rare gold coins possibly worth $80 million or more on Friday after a U.S. appeals court overturned a jury verdict. U.S. Department of the Treasury officials insist the $20 Double Eagles were stolen from the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia before the 1933 series was melted down when the country went off the gold standard. They argued that Joan Langbord and her sons cannot lawfully own the coins, which she said she found in a family bank deposit box in 2003. Langbord's father, jeweler Israel Switt, had dealings with the Mint in the 1930s and was twice investigated over his coin holdings. A jury in 2012 sided with the government. However, the appeals court returned the

  • New York Citi Bikes soon to allow riders to count calories

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — New Yorkers may soon be able to count calories burned and miles traveled while pedaling Citi Bikes, the popular bicycle-sharing program with a troubled history that is undergoing a major overhaul under new leadership. The new CEO of the Brooklyn-based company that owns Citi Bike says a revamped smartphone app will soon offer such detailed fitness stats and allow people to make real-time reports of such issues as flat tires or broken seats.

  • Ex-Iowa lawmaker testifies he didn't sexually abuse wife

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    GARNER, Iowa (AP) — A former Iowa lawmaker accused of sexually abusing his wife who suffered from dementia testified Friday that he and his wife held hands, prayed and kissed at her nursing home on the evening in question, but that they had no sexual contact. Henry Rayhons, 78, testified in his own defense, saying any sounds that his wife's former roommate heard at the nursing home that day in May were just him situating his wife in her bed. His wife, Donna Lou Rayhons, died in August. "She was my queen," he testified. "I miss her every day. I will never take her ring off." Prosecutors allege Rayhons had sex with his wife that day at the facility in Garner after being told she was no longer mentally capable of consent

  • Man gets 100-year term in murder of teacher in oil boom town

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    SIDNEY, Mont. (AP) — A man was sentenced to 100 years in prison Friday in a Montana teacher's murder — a case that local officials say robbed the victim's rural hometown of its innocence amid an oil boom that's swept across the Northern Plains. Michael Keith Spell, 25, of Parachute, Colorado, was sentenced following a hearing before state District Judge Richard Simonton in Sidney. Spell, who is mentally disabled and described by the defense as functionally illiterate, pleaded guilty in October to killing Sherry Arnold, 43, after attempting to abduct the popular math teacher as she was jogging near her home in 2012. Arnold's body was found months later buried in a shallow grave in a rural area near Williston, North D

  • Authorities close to revealing details of bourbon theft

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The mystery of who's been spiriting away barrels of Kentucky bourbon might soon have a resolution, as authorities seem close to revealing details about a possible theft ring. So far, one person has been arrested in the theft of Wild Turkey bourbon from a Kentucky warehouse, but a prosecutor signaled Friday that the case is much broader. Franklin County Commonwealth's Attorney Larry Cleveland said he expects multiple people to be indicted as his office prepared to present the case to a grand jury in Frankfort, Kentucky. "If all things fall into place and nothing else develops, we'd go and present that case for indictment on Tuesday," he said.

  • FBI ruse violated rights of Vegas hotel guest, US judge says

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — The FBI violated the rights of a wealthy Malaysian businessman when agents posed as Internet repairmen to get into his Las Vegas hotel suite to search for evidence of wrongdoing during the World Cup soccer tournament last summer, a federal judge ruled Friday. "The government violated the defendant's Fourth Amendment rights" against unreasonable searches and seizures, U.S. District Judge Andrew Gordon said in a bluntly worded decision. His ruling threw out evidence collected last July from Wei Seng "Paul" Phua's high-security luxury villa at Caesars Palace. "This had implications for all Americans," defense attorney David Chesnoff said, hailing the decision as a victory for freedom.

  • Fund for Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder hints at presidential run

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — People close to Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder have formed a fund allowing him to travel the country to more aggressively tell of the state's rebound under his watch, raising the prospect of a potential Republican presidential bid. A spokesman for the governor told The Associated Press on Friday that a 501(c)(4) group, Making Government Accountable, was established within the past month. "Once we get into May, the governor will travel more out of the state and promote Michigan, particularly the remarkable economic comeback," Jarrod Agen said. An aide close to the governor said Snyder is considering a presidential run and that a decision could be made in a few weeks.

  • Common Core tests OK, but Nevada gives leeway to schools

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Limited testing was successful Friday in Nevada for the troubled Common Core assessments, but now the state is offering school districts leeway that could present an unprecedented challenge to the federal testing mandate. It's the latest option given to school systems across three states impacted by a widespread system crash with New Hampshire-based Measured Progress. Nevada, Montana and North Dakota contract with the company to administer the tests that are linked to hotly disputed, federally backed education standards. On Tuesday, the company's server crashed due to capacity and coding problems. It caused spotty access and a logistical nightmare. Testing stopped but has cost some schools money in the form

  • US oil and natural gas rig count drops by 34 to 954

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    Oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. says the number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. declined by 34 this week to 954 amid depressed oil prices. Houston-based Baker Hughes said Friday 734 rigs were seeking oil and 217 explored for natural gas. Three were listed as miscellaneous. A year ago, 1,831 rigs were active. Among major oil- and gas-producing states, Texas plummeted by 15 rigs; Oklahoma was down six; North Dakota lost five; Wyoming was down four; and California, Kansas and Pennsylvania each dropped two. Alaska, Arkansas, Ohio and Utah declined by one each. Louisiana rose by 5 while New Mexico gained two. Colorado and West Virginia were unchanged. The U.S. rig count peaked at 4,530

  • Oklahoma teen convicted in slaying of Australian player

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    DUNCAN, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma teenager whose attorney said he only meant to scare an Australian college baseball player by firing a shot at him was convicted Friday of first-degree murder. The Stephens County jury found Chancey Allen Luna guilty in the Aug. 16, 2013, death of Christopher Lane, 22, who was shot in the back while jogging along a city street in Duncan. The jury recommended that Luna receive life in prison without parole when he is sentenced in June. Defense attorney Jim Berry had acknowledged that Luna fired the fatal shot from a passing car that he was riding in, but during closing arguments he repeatedly noted that Luna was 16 at the time and said 16-year-olds take stupid, senseless, thoughtless actions,




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