• Man charged in stabbings, including 1 fatal, at church camp

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    URBANA, Md. (AP) — An apparently homeless Virginia man fatally stabbed a South Korean missionary and seriously wounded his wife at a Maryland church retreat center, authorities said Monday. Song Su Kim, 30, of Falls Church, Virginia, was charged in Frederick County, Maryland, with first- and second-degree murder, first- and second-degree attempted murder and two counts of assault. Deputies responded Sunday night to a 911 call reporting the stabbing at the Anna Prayer Mountain Church Retreat Center, a Christian complex set amid wooded hills near the rural community of Urbana, about 40 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., said Sheriff Chuck Jenkins. Charging documents identified the victims as Chung Hwan Park, 63, and h

  • Correction: Movie Theater Shooting-Timeline story

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    In a timeline of the life of Louisiana movie theater gunman John Russell Houser, The Associated Press, relying on court filings his family's lawyer submitted to obtain a protective order against him in 2008, reported erroneously that a Carroll County probate judge ordered him committed involuntarily to a mental hospital. Judge Betty Cason says her order was limited to ordering deputies to deliver Houser against his will if necessary to a hospital for a mental health evaluation.

  • Mental health experts respond carefully to mass killings

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — One psychiatry professor calls it "the conversation we're stuck with," a teachable moment growing out of horror. Each time mental illness is cited as a possible factor in a high-profile mass killing, there's a collective sigh among mental health professionals. Even as they see an opportunity for serious discussions of problems and remedies, they also worry about setbacks to their efforts to destigmatize mental illness. "Most people who suffer from mental illness are not violent, and most violent acts are committed by people who are not mentally ill," said Dr. Renee Binder, president of the American Psychiatric Association. If, hypothetically, everyone with mental illness were locked up, "you might thin

  • With a new 'Vacation,' a look at laughable comedy remakes

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — The modern comedy remake is among the most laughable of movie genres. In Hollywood's reboot frenzy, the movie industry has increasingly turned to reviving classic comedies, only to find that few things are harder to rekindle than the elusive elements — Bill Murray's timing, John Belushi's eyebrows— that make up a great comedy. The distance between original and remake is usually as vast as it is between "Caddyshack" and "Caddyshack II." The latest attempt is "Vacation," a new try at the classic National Lampoon series that first emanated from John Hughes' short story "Vacation '58" and was launched with the 1983 Chevy Chase original. Chase makes a cameo in the latest "Vacation," but he has ceded the drive

  • Correction: Movie Theater Shooting story

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) — In stories published July 25 about Louisiana movie theater gunman John Russell Houser, The Associated Press, relying on court filings his family's lawyer submitted to obtain a protective order against him in 2008, reported erroneously that Carroll County Probate Judge Betty Cason ordered him committed involuntarily to a hospital for mental health treatment. Cason says her order was limited to detaining Houser against his will if necessary and delivering him to a hospital for a mental health evaluation.

  • Dallas dad charged in 2-year-old daughter's hot-car death

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    DALLAS (AP) — A Dallas man has been charged with child abandonment in the death of his 2-year-old daughter who was left in a hot car. Dallas police on Monday arrested 40-year-old Hamuda Raufu in the July 17 death of his daughter, Sekinat. The girl's parents told police the family spent the day at Fair Park, drove home and went inside and took naps. The father awoke and went outside to work on the car, then noticed the girl still strapped in her child safety seat in the back seat of the vehicle. The father called an ambulance while the mother performed CPR. The toddler died at a Dallas hospital. A judge set bond at $5,000 for Raufu. Online jail records do not list an attorney who could comment on the allega

  • Get the waffles! Maple syrup spills on New Hampshire highway

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    KEENE, N.H. (AP) — The only thing missing was the waffles. Authorities in Keene, New Hampshire, were in for some sticky times when a load of maple syrup shifted in a tractor trailer and leaked very slowly all over a main highway. Police Sgt. Thaddeus Derendal says about 220 gallons of the sweet-smelling pancake-topper from a Vermont producer oozed onto Route 101 on Monday afternoon. Firefighters used squeegees to corral the mess and poured something like kitty litter on it to speed the drying process. The two eastbound lanes were reduced to one lane while the cleanup was underway. ___ This story has been corrected to show 220 gallons of syrup spilled, not 225 gallons.

  • Proposed SFX sale fails to draw competing offers

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Electronic dance music promoter SFX Entertainment Inc. said Monday that it hasn't received any formal competing offers, putting the $490 million sale of the company to its CEO one step closer to closing. SFX shares fell 54 cents, or 14 percent, to close at $3.32 on Monday. In May, SFX announced plans to sell itself to its Chairman and CEO Robert Sillerman for $5.25 per share in cash. Under the terms of the deal, SFX had the right to seek competing offers until July 24. The two sides valued at deal at $774 million including SFX's debt, its cash and cash equivalents, stock options and other items.

  • Judge: Immigrant kids should be freed from family detention

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that immigrant children arriving on the U.S. border with their mothers should not be detained in secure detention facilities. But experts say it isn't entirely clear when they might get out. The ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Dolly M. Gee has raised a series of questions about what will happen to hundreds of Central American children and mothers kept in family detention facilities in Texas and Pennsylvania that were created after a surge in the number of immigrants reaching the border last year. WHAT IS FAMILY DETENTION? The U.S.

  • Ohio lawmaker working as auctioneer is convicted of theft

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    PORT CLINTON, Ohio (AP) — A northern Ohio lawmaker accused of stealing antiques and other items from a home while doing work as an auctioneer has been convicted on a felony theft charge and immediately removed from office under state law. An Ottawa County jury on Monday convicted Rep. Steve Kraus of theft but acquitted him on a breaking and entering charge. A burglary charge was dismissed previously. The Republican from Sandusky has maintained his innocence. His attorney has said he took items from a Port Clinton home to inventory them for auction at the request of a real estate agent.

  • Republic stock plunges on possible flight disruptions

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    DALLAS (AP) — Republic Airways warned that its operation of regional flights for the nation's biggest airlines could be disrupted by a pilot shortage and labor standoff. Its shares fell 56 percent to their lowest level since January 2012. Republic disclosed late Friday that it had cut flying by 4 percent in early summer and was talking with American, United, Delta and US Airways about reducing its flying more through the first half of next year. At American Airlines, which also owns US Airways, spokesman Casey Norton said the airlines use 10 regional carriers and were working with Republic on "minor schedule adjustments" to reduce impact on passengers. Delta and United spokesmen said their airlines were trying to mini

  • Lynch: Easing distrust between minorities, police a top goal

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    HOUSTON (AP) — U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says one of her top priorities remains alleviating an "epidemic of distrust" between communities and law enforcement. Lynch discussed tensions between minority communities and police agencies during a speech Monday in Houston at the national convention of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., the country's largest African-American women's organization. Lynch did not mention any specific incidents related to this tension, including the in-custody death in nearby Waller County, Texas, of Sandra Bland, a black woman who authorities say hanged herself earlier this month in her cell after a traffic-stop confrontation with a white officer.

  • Medical examiner confirms Oklahoma family stabbed to death

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A Broken Arrow couple and three of their children found dead inside their home last week all died from "multiple sharp-force injuries," the Oklahoma medical examiner's office confirmed on Monday. The killings of David Bever, 52, his wife April Bever, 44, and siblings Daniel Bever, 12, Christopher Bever, 7, and Victoria Bever, 5, have been classified as homicides, said office spokeswoman Amy Elliott. The final autopsy reports have not been released, Elliott said. Robert Bever, 18, is accused in a booking document of five counts of first-degree murder and a count of aggravated assault in the Wednesday night attack at the family's home in the Tulsa suburb.

  • NY wins $600 million hub for photonics research, development

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Rochester, whose fortunes have risen and fallen with the demand for futuristic technologies from former powerhouses like Xerox and Kodak, is looking for its next big breakthrough in the field of integrated photonics, a light science with the potential to transform communications, medicine and national defense. Federal, state and local officials on Monday announced the city as the national headquarters for a $610 million research and manufacturing hub dedicated to the emerging field, which could mean thousands of jobs for the region. "You've gone from making Brownie cameras to the lenses that are now mapping the far side of Pluto," Vice President Joe Biden told an audience inside a vacant Kodak buildin

  • Rates on US Treasury bills rise to highest point this year

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Interest rates on short-term Treasury bills rose in Monday's auction to the highest levels this year. The Treasury Department auctioned $24 billion in three-month bills at a discount rate of 0.050 percent, up from 0.030 percent last week. Another $24 billion in six-month bills was auctioned at a discount rate of 0.145 percent, up from 0.135 percent last week. The three-month rate was the highest since three-month bills averaged 0.055 percent on Dec. 22. The six-month rate was the highest since these bills averaged 0.155 percent, also on Dec. 22 of last year. The discount rates reflect that the bills sell for less than face value. For a $10,000 bill, the three-month price was $9,998.74, while a six-mo

  • True-crime writer Ann Rule, who wrote about former co-worker Ted Bundy, dies at age 83

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    SEATTLE (AP) — True-crime writer Ann Rule, who wrote about former co-worker Ted Bundy, dies at age 83.

  • Apple Watch will be sold at some Best Buy stores

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Apple Watch is heading to some Best Buy stores ahead of the holiday shopping season. Best Buy Co. says it will sell the Apple Watch at 100 of its stores and on its website on August 7. Another 200 Best Buy stores will offer the smartwatch before the end of the year. Best Buy, which has more than 1,000 stores in the U.S., says it's the first national retailer to sell the watch outside of Apple Inc.'s stores. The retailer, based in Richfield, Minnesota, will offer models of the smartwatch that cost between $349.99 and $699.99. Apple unveiled the watch in September and began taking orders in April. The Cupertino, California, company hasn't released any sale figures for the new device.

  • The Latest: Brown says loss of daughter is 'unimaginable'

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — The latest on the death of Bobbi Kristina Brown (all times local): 4:45 p.m. R&B singer Bobby Brown says the loss of daughter Bobbi Kristina Brown at age 22 is "unimaginable." "Krissy was and is an angel," he said in a statement Monday. "I am completely numb at this time." Bobbi Kristina died Sunday at Peachtree Christian Hospice in Duluth, Georgia, about six months after she was found, face-down and unresponsive in a bathtub in her suburban Atlanta townhome on Jan. 31. A police report earlier this year described the incident as a drowning. The Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office says the initial portion of an autopsy on Brown has not found an obvious cause of death, but a final ru

  • Delta Air to buy stake in China Eastern Airlines

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Delta said it will pay $450 million to buy a stake in China Eastern Airlines as the Atlanta-based airline seeks to expand into China's fast-growing travel industry. The deal will give Delta a 3.55 percent stake in Shanghai-based China Eastern and an observer seat on China Eastern's board of directors, the companies said Monday. The boards of both airlines still need to approve the deal, and the companies did not say when that is expected to happen. Delta and China Eastern already have partnered on flights between the U.S. and China. And in April, Delta moved its operations in Shanghai's Pudong Airport to the same terminal as China Eastern and its subsidiary Shanghai Airlines.

  • Feds: 'Wicked Tuna' TV fisherman claimed to be disabled

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — A Massachusetts man seen manning big fishing rods and harpooning huge fish on the reality show "Wicked Tuna" collected government benefits while claiming to be disabled and unable to work, federal prosecutors said. Paul Hebert, 50, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, accepted more than $44,000 in Social Security and Medicaid benefits between 2010 and 2013, according to a four-count indictment filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Burlington. Hebert first filed for Social Security disability in the spring of 2009, claiming on his application that he was unable to work at any job, could not walk properly, could not lift heavy weights or drive for more than short distances, according to the indictment.




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