• Lava eruption prompts Iceland aviation alert

    Yesterday

    REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — Lava fountains danced along a lengthy volcanic fissure near Iceland's subglacial Bardarbunga volcano Sunday, prompting authorities to raise the aviation warning code to the highest level and close the surrounding airspace. The red warning code — the highest in the country's alert system — was raised early Sunday after the eruption in the Holuhraun lava field, about five kilometers (three miles) north of the Dyngjujoekull glacier. The warning was lowered 12 hours later as visibility improved and it was clear that no volcanic ash was detected. The country's meteorological agency said scientists were monitoring the ongoing eruption. "Visual observation confirms it is calm, but continuous," t

  • Strong earthquake aftershock shakes Napa Valley

    Yesterday

    NAPA, Calif. (AP) — A significant aftershock from last weekend's magnitude-6.0 earthquake has rattled Northern California's wine country. The U.S. Geological Survey says the magnitude-3.2 tremor struck 5 miles south of the city of Napa just before 2 a.m. Sunday. Thomas Brocher, director of USGS' Earthquake Science Center, says it wasn't the strongest aftershock to rumble the region since the main quake a week ago caused as much as $1 billion in damage and multiple injuries. A magnitude-3.9 aftershock centered 8 miles south of Napa hit early Tuesday morning. The USGS says there have been more than 70 aftershocks recorded since last Sunday's earthquake. No additional damage or injuries have been reported.

  • Pittsburgh-based reality show 'The Chair' to debut

    Yesterday

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — Viewers of a new reality show will soon find out what happens when two fledgling directors are given $850,000 to direct their own movies from the same script. "The Chair" debuts Sept. 6 on the cable network Starz and documents the making of both movies. The show will be followed shortly after by the theatrical and digital releases of the two movies at the center of the docuseries. The 10-week series will air in one-hour installments each Saturday through mid-November. It's the brainchild of Chris Moore, who produced "American Pie" and "Good Will Hunting." Both movies in the docuseries are based on a script by Dan Schoffer called "How Soon is Now.

  • Feds want nuclear waste train, but nowhere to go

    Yesterday

    ATLANTA (AP) — The U.S. government is looking for trains to haul radioactive waste from nuclear power plants to disposal sites. Too bad those trains have nowhere to go. Putting the cart before the horse, the U.S. Department of Energy recently asked companies for ideas on how the government should get the rail cars needed to haul 150-ton casks filled with used, radioactive nuclear fuel. They won't be moving anytime soon. The latest government plans call for having an interim test storage site in 2021 and a long-term geologic depository in 2048. No one knows where those sites will be, but the Obama administration is already thinking about contracts to develop, test and certify the necessary rail equipment. U.S.

  • Search for pilot who crashed off Va. shore halted

    Yesterday

    CHINCOTEAGUE, Va. (AP) — The Coast Guard has suspended the search for a pilot who lost consciousness and crashed a small airplane into the Atlantic Ocean off the Virginia shore. Petty Officer Nate Littlejohn says the search was halted Sunday morning after a civilian boater recovered a wheel and engine cowling from the single-engine Cirrus. Littlejohn says the chances of finding anything else were slim. The plane drifted into restricted airspace over the nation's capital Saturday afternoon, scrambling fighter jets that stayed with it until it crashed about 50 miles southeast of Chincoteague. The plane had left Waukesha, Wisconsin, and was headed to Manassas, Virginia. The pilot, whose name has not been released, was the only

  • Cleveland welcomes growing field of server farms

    Yesterday

    CLEVELAND (AP) — Northeast Ohio is hardly ready to usurp Silicon Valley as a high-tech mecca, but a growing number of data centers are choosing to locate in and around Cleveland to take advantage of cheap power, an abundance of fiber-optic cable and one of the safest environments in the country for storing digital information. BYTEGRID, which got its start in northern Virginia, is investing millions to convert a small data center near downtown Cleveland into a large one capable of using enough electricity to power around 20,000 homes. At least one other company is looking for a site in Cleveland, and several more have established sites in the city and its suburbs.

  • China: No open nominations for Hong Kong leader

    Yesterday

    BEIJING (AP) — China's legislature on Sunday ruled out allowing open nominations in the inaugural election for Hong Kong's leader, saying they would create a "chaotic society." Democracy activists in the Asian financial hub responded by saying that a long-threatened mass occupation of the heart of the city "will definitely happen." In setting tight limits on how far electoral reforms can go in Hong Kong, Beijing issued its firmest reminder yet that it's still in charge despite the substantial autonomy it promised the city after taking control from Britain in 1997.

  • Mom charged in girl's death could get trust fund

    Yesterday

    WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — A special education teacher accused of killing her severely disabled 8-year-old daughter by withholding food and medical care could inherit nearly $1 million from the girl's trust fund — even if she's convicted. Nicole Diggs and her husband have pleaded not guilty to charges of negligent homicide and child endangerment in the 2012 death of Alayah Savarese, who was the beneficiary of a trust fund created from the settlement of a malpractice suit that stemmed from complications during her birth. The indictment doesn't allege that the trust fund was a motive, but Diggs' attorney says prosecutors are nevertheless implying that her client "somehow disposed of her daughter in order to obtain the money.

  • 5 things to know about former Va. governor trial

    Yesterday

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Jurors will begin deliberations Tuesday in the public corruption trial of former Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, who could face decades in prison and millions of dollars in fines if convicted. They are charged with accepting more than $165,000 in gifts, trips and loans from former Star Scientific Inc. CEO Jonnie Williams in exchange for promoting his company's tobacco-derived anti-inflammatory, Anatabloc. The jury heard from dozens of witnesses over five weeks and viewed a mountain of exhibits culled from the 3.5 million pages of documents collected by authorities. Bob McDonnell testified in his own defense. His wife did not testify. Williams testified under immunity as the government's star w

  • Ferguson's flashpoint sparks national outrage

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — They were killed in Wisconsin, New York and California. Some were shot on the street. One was killed in a Wal-Mart. Another died after being placed in a chokehold. All died at the hands of police and all have been united by one thing: the killing of Michael Brown. Details may differ, circumstances of their deaths may remain unknown, but the outrage that erupted after the Aug. 9 fatal shooting of the unarmed, black 18-year-old by a white officer in Ferguson, Missouri, has become a rallying cry in protests over police killings across the nation. While there's been nothing approaching the violence seen in the St.

  • Chefs, breeders pair up to produce tastier veggies

    Yesterday

    VERONA, Wis. (AP) — There's a good chance that many of the suddenly trendy vegetables that foodies latch on to in the next decade will benefit from research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. While plant breeders at many public universities focus on improving field corn, soybeans and other crops used in food manufacturing or livestock feed, those in Madison want to produce better-tasting vegetables. The university has long had ties to the vegetable processing industry, as Wisconsin is among the top two or three states in producing canned or frozen sweet corn, green beans and peas. But vegetable breeders say the local food movement has created additional opportunities with a boom in organic farms, farmers markets and fa

  • Track: Vintage car racer is 1st death in 32 years

    Yesterday

    SALISBURY, Conn. (AP) — A spokesman for a Connecticut track says a man who crashed in a race of vintage cars is the first death in the historic-racing festival's 32-year history. Authorities say 73-year-old Lee Duran, of Lyme, lost control of his car and crashed Saturday afternoon at Lime Rock Park during a race of pre-World War II cars. No other cars were involved. Track spokesman Rick Roso said Sunday that Duran was driving a 1934 MG PA Special in a race of pre-World War II cars. Roso says the victim's wife told him Duran had been racing vintage cars for a number of years. The spokesman says the track will honor Duran when the festival continues Monday.

  • 18th century brewery remains found at Va. college

    Yesterday

    WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) — College students have always had a taste for beer, and archaeologists have uncovered new evidence at the College of William and Mary to prove it. The remains of what is likely an 18th century on-campus brewery were discovered just outside of the nation's oldest college building when campus officials were looking to widen a sidewalk. School officials say the discovery near the Wren Building will allow them to tell a broader story about campus life in the Colonial era that involved the interaction of slaves, Native Americans, faculty and students. Major excavation of the site wrapped up on Friday, and archaeologists now plan to perform a detailed lab analysis on some of what they've found.

  • Algeria soccer death seen as part of wider ills

    Yesterday

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — The rocks came raining down after the final whistle of the Algerian soccer match, an increasingly common ritual in stadiums across the country. This time, the violence ended in tragedy: Hit in the head, Albert Ebosse, the league's top goal scorer last season, crumbled to the ground and died in a hospital. Algerian youths are storming pitches, stoning players and clashing outside stadiums in a wave of hooliganism seen as an outlet for daily frustrations such as joblessness, weak institutions and sheer boredom. Players say a death like that of Ebosse, killed by his own fans, was only a matter of time.

  • Obamas attend wedding of their longtime chef

    Yesterday

    POCANTICO HILLS, N.Y. (AP) — Setting aside for a few hours the pressures of trying to calm the world's trouble spots, President Barack Obama assumed the role of spectator for something more joyous: the wedding of the first family's longtime chef and friend. Chef Sam Kass and MSNBC host Alex Wagner tied the knot Saturday at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, a farm-to-table restaurant in Pocantico Hills, just north of New York City. The president and his chef have a close relationship, which Obama highlighted earlier this month when he spent several hours at dinner at Kass' apartment amid the turmoil in Iraq, Ukraine and Ferguson, Missouri. It's long been said that time is a president's most precious commodity.

  • 3 juveniles dead in Pennsylvania SUV crash, 3 hurt

    Yesterday

    LAKE ARIEL, Pa. (AP) — Authorities say an SUV carrying six young people overturned in northeastern Pennsylvania, killing three and injuring the others. State police did not release the ages of those involved in Saturday morning's crash but said all were juveniles. The crash happened in Paupack Township, Wayne County, about 70 miles north of Philadelphia. Wayne County coroner Edward Howell tells The Times-Tribune of Scranton an autopsy is planned for Monday on one occupant who died at the scene. Lackawanna County coroner Timothy Rowland tells the newspaper two boys ages 15 and 16 died at a Scranton hospital. He says they were from Bucks County, near Philadelphia. The extent of the survivors' injuries was not rele

  • Made in America music festival rocks Los Angeles

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A group of sexy dancers backed Iggy Azalea as Rita Ora joined her on stage. Kendrick Lamar shared the spotlight with label-mate Schoolboy Q during his set. Afrojack got the crowd jumping, and Imagine Dragons closed out the evening. The first night of the inaugural Budweiser Made in America music festival in Los Angeles went off with few problems, despite concerns from residents about possible security and traffic issues. Lamar noted the unique setting, saying, "I've been touring the world, and I ain't never done a festival in the heart of Los Angeles." Other acts performing Saturday in sunny Grand Park included Metric, Sublime with Rome, rapper YG and rockers Capital Cities.

  • Longtime personal chef to Obama weds MSNBC host

    Yesterday

    POCANTICO HILLS, N.Y. (AP) — President Barack Obama on Saturday temporarily set aside the pressures of trying to calm the world's trouble spots and assumed the role of spectator for something more joyous: the wedding of the Obama family's longtime chef and friend. Chef Sam Kass and MSNBC host Alex Wagner were tying the knot at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, a farm-to-table restaurant in Pocantico Hills, just north of New York City. Obama and Kass have a close relationship, which Obama highlighted earlier this month by spending several hours at dinner at Kass' apartment amid the turmoil in Iraq, Ukraine and Ferguson, Missouri. It's long been said that time is a president's most precious commodity.

  • D.C. Notes: Oklahoma's 5th congressional district race seems to lack voter interest

    BY CHRIS CASTEEL, Washington Bureau | Published: Sun, Aug 31, 2014

    Also in notes from Washington, lawyers from all over the country wanted in on Oklahoma’s same-sex marriage case after a Norman attorney spent years working on it.

  • Taking Stock: Be aware that annuities carry commissions, fees

    Published: Sun, Aug 31, 2014

    Malcolm Berko: Dividend-paying blue chips might be a better choice, Berko says.