• Mistrial in case of sex assault defendant who shot himself

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    BRENTWOOD, N.H. (AP) — A judge declared a mistrial in the case of a New Hampshire man who shot himself Friday in the courthouse parking lot while awaiting a jury's verdict on charges he sexually assaulted a piano student more than a decade ago. Authorities said 75-year-old John Goodwin, a longtime piano instructor in Atkinson, went on trial this week on six counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault involving a former student. The jury began deliberating the case Friday morning, about two hours before Goodwin shot himself near his car outside the Rockingham County Superior Courthouse in Brentwood, authorities said. He was airlifted to a Massachusetts hospital. The sheriff's office confirmed the gunshot was self-inf

  • American, United delay, change Boeing 787 orders

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    American Airlines Group Inc. says it will delay delivery of five Boeing 787 jets in response to slower growth in international travel demand. American announced Friday that it will take the planes in 2017 and 2018 instead of 2016. American took delivery of its third 787 on Friday but has not yet used them on passenger flights. It plans to put the first one into service next month on flights between Dallas and Chicago, then use 787s on international routes starting in June. Boeing spokesman Doug Alder said the company often works with customers like American "to adjust delivery schedules that benefit them and Boeing." News of the delay surfaced a day after United Continental Holdings Inc.

  • Review: Getting your Apple Watch? Here's how to use it

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Apple Watches have arrived to the first group of people who had ordered one two weeks ago. Those who haven't bought one yet will likely face a wait. Apple's retail stores won't have them, with the company taking orders over the Internet only — for delivery as late as July for some models. Although a handful of other stores are carrying them, quantities are limited — and you have to make it to the store. Maxfield in Los Angeles is carrying the watch, along with boutique and department stores in Paris, London, Tokyo and Berlin and authorized resellers in China and Japan. Whenever you get yours, get ready for a new way of interacting with your digital life. A better way? I'll need more time with the w

  • Taking the abs out of Abercrombie: retailer tones down sexy

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Abercrombie & Fitch is saying goodbye to the shirtless beefcake models who greeted customers at its doors. The New Albany, Ohio-based company, which operates stores under its namesake brand and Hollister, announced Friday that store associates will not be hired "based on body type or physical attractiveness" and it will no longer call them "models" but "brand representatives." It also said that its employees can be more individualistic when they dress, ditching its "look policy," which banned eyeliner and certain hair styles among other things. It's also bidding adieu to "sexualized" photos in marketing materials in its stores and on its gift cards and shopping bags, starting in late July.

  • North Dakota OKs new oil tax framework, ends price triggers

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — With oil prices sinking enough that drillers may soon see a more favorable tax rate, North Dakota lawmakers approved a new framework Friday that cuts the price-triggered exemption in exchange for a lower tax rate. North Dakota's House voted 66-26 after a contentious debate to shave the state's oil tax rate from 11.5 percent to 10 percent. Republicans believe the move offers better certainty for the state and industry, while Democrats say it could cost the state billions in future oil tax revenue. "We're taking a real risk and probably something we can never get back," said Rep. Jerry Kelsh, D-Fullerton. Fargo Rep.

  • Denver judge weighs whether to roll back coal mine approvals

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — A federal judge in Denver who stopped a planned coal mine expansion because of climate concerns last year is weighing whether to also halt coal mining approved in the last decade in northwestern Colorado. Unlike the previous case, most of the coal at issue has already been dug out of the ground, leaving U.S. District Judge R. Brooke Jackson to decide what, if anything, to do now even if he decides that federal regulators did not pay enough attention to the environmental impacts of coal mining in approving the new mining.

  • New York begins effort to help startups navigate regulations

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Technology startups and New York authorities will get each other's input on dealing with regulations under an initiative the state attorney general and New York City's chief lawyer announced Friday. Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, city Corporation Counsel Zachary Carter and some law schools are working together on what Schneiderman called the first startup law clinic to boast expertise from government authorities. "This will help new companies navigate our regulatory system, but it will also provide insights to the state and local government about outdated or overly cumbersome rules, and trends that we need to be aware of," Schneiderman said at a Fordham University School of Law conference on the sharing

  • Despite tensions, US, Russia vow cooperation in the Arctic

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    IQALUIT, Canada (AP) — The United States, Russia and other Arctic countries looked past Ukraine's civil war and other tensions Friday, vowing to cooperate on preventing oil spills near the North Pole and combating climate change in a region warming faster than any other. Assuming the chair of the eight-nation Arctic Council, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said nations needed to significantly reduce emissions of black carbon and methane, short-lived greenhouse gases that are particularly potent sources of the Arctic's warming. He said firm reduction goals would be set at the next meeting of ministers in 2017 in Alaska. "These pollutants are a threat to everybody," Kerry said.

  • Cost to protect Walker more than tripled since predecessor

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Security costs for Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker and Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch last year were more than three times what it cost to protect Walker's Democratic predecessor in 2010, records released Friday to The Associated Press show. Walker provided the security detail costs in response to an open records request. They came a day after his political committee, Our American Revival, said it would pick up the tab for Walker's security detail when it travels with him to purely political events, such as a gathering of likely Republican presidential candidates this weekend in Iowa. Walker has been traveling the country — and the world — in advance of an all-but-certain 2016 presidential bid.

  • Legislature passes bill that would make Hawaii first state to raise legal smoking age to 21

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — Legislature passes bill that would make Hawaii first state to raise legal smoking age to 21.

  • Task force launching to examine Superstorm Sandy problems

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A task force will begin work next week with the Federal Emergency Management Agency's national flood insurance program to examine problems that arose after Superstorm Sandy and to develop recommendations to correct them. U.S. Sens. Bob Menendez and Cory Booker, of New Jersey, and Charles Schumer and Kristen Gillibrand, of New York, plan to launch the Sandy task force Tuesday in Washington. Steven Sandberg, a spokesman for Menendez, said the group's short-term goal is to make sure Sandy victims get what they deserve, while also working on recommendations for long-lasting, concrete changes. "Ultimately, they have to look and take a deep dive into where the problems lie and where the fixes might be a

  • Man ordered to trial on charges of kidnapping, raping teen

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — A California man was ordered Friday to stand trial on charges of kidnapping and raping a 15-year-old girl that he went on to marry and live with for a decade. Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald made the decision after hearing preliminary evidence against 41-year-old Isidro Garcia, who has pleaded not guilty. Authorities said the daughter of Garcia's live-in girlfriend told them he began fondling her shortly after she was brought from Mexico in 2004 to live with her mother in Santa Ana, and that he repeatedly had sex with her despite her protests.

  • Oil, gas, power, prices: big themes from energy meeting

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    HOUSTON (AP) — In the year since the energy industry last gathered for its big annual confab in Houston, prices for oil and natural gas took a dive that few, if anyone, saw coming. A chastened parade of energy executives, analysts, academics and government officials from several countries delivered speeches and participated in panels as part of IHS's CERAWeek energy conference, worrying over prices and making a profit, and speculating on what it could all mean for economies and consumers around the world. Here are five major themes from this year's conference. YOUR ENERGY PRICES Speaker after speaker here said that prices for oil, gasoline and diesel will remain far below where they had been for much of this dec

  • Iowa law tries to ensure adult children can see sick parents

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A year after the children of radio personality Casey Kasem had to seek court action to see their ailing father, a new Iowa law aims to ensure that adult children can see their sick parents — granting them visitation rights unless the person's guardian goes to court to stop them. Gov. Terry Branstad signed the bill Friday. The law gives an adult with a legal guardian — someone who cannot manage their own affairs — the right to receive visits from family members and others they have previously expressed interest in seeing. Sen. Rob Hogg said he started working on the issue after hearing from a constituent having difficulty visiting her brother.

  • Univ. of Florida suspends frat over abuse of wounded vets

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — The University of Florida suspended one of its fraternities on Friday after allegations that its members hurled drunken insults and spat at a group of disabled military veterans at a Panama City Beach resort. The school said on Friday that it is charging the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity with obscene behavior, public intoxication, theft, causing physical or other harm, and damage to property. The suspension came after the fraternity had already suspended operations itself and expelled three of its members after finding they had behaved inappropriately. "I am personally offended and disappointed by the behavior that has been described to me," Dave Kratzer, the school's student affairs vice president

  • Activists seek probe of prosecutor's role in Ferguson case

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri judge gave strong indications Friday that he might toss a lawsuit by four activists seeking an independent investigation of a prosecutor's handling of grand jury proceedings in the Michael Brown shooting case. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Joseph Walsh III heard 90 minutes of arguments before deciding to resume the hearing on May 29. But he told the activists' attorneys that an outside investigation may be unnecessary, since the U.S. Justice Department reached the same conclusion as the county grand jury that declined to prosecute Darren Wilson, the white Ferguson police officer who shot and killed Brown, a black, unarmed 18-year-old.

  • No trade breakthrough expected with Japan during Abe visit

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to Washington next week comes amid heightened attention in Congress to an Asia-Pacific trade deal that has created a deep rift between President Barack Obama and members of his Democratic Party and whose central feature is liberalized commerce between the U.S. and Japan. White House officials said Friday that Obama and Abe are not expected to announce a final agreement on trade talks between the two nations. Officials said negotiators have made progress, but differences remain over how to reduce U.S. auto tariffs and Japanese barriers on U.S. agriculture products.

  • 6 Texas jailers fired after inmate left alone for weeks

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    HOUSTON (AP) — Six Texas jailers were fired and 29 others suspended after a mentally ill inmate was left unattended and alone in his cell for weeks with insect-infested food containers, a feces-clogged toilet and ropes from his shredded jail uniform hanging from the ceiling. Among those fired by Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia on Friday were two jail sergeants indicted earlier this month on record-tampering charges for signing off on paperwork stating that Deterrius Rashad Goodwin was in good condition in his second-floor cell in the Harris County Jail. The jail sergeants, Sgt. Ricky D. Pickens-Wilson and Sgt. John Figaroa, are both free on $5,000 bond. If convicted, each faces from two to 10 years in prison.

  • After violence last year, new city to host pumpkin festival

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    LACONIA, N.H. (AP) — The annual New Hampshire Pumpkin Festival has a new home in the city of Laconia after its longtime host city declined to issue a permit following violence that led to more than 100 arrests near last year's event. At an official announcement in the city's historic train station Friday, Mayor Ed Engler said Laconia's experience hosting an annual motorcycle festival that attracts upward of 100,000 people has given officials a good handle on security and public safety for the pumpkin festival. The lack of a four-year college in the city, Engler added, removes a group that was largely blamed for last year's outbursts. "We have the infrastructure in place from a regulatory standpoint and from a supervision st

  • US rests in corruption case against Philadelphia ex-officers

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Federal prosecutors rested their monthlong case Friday against six former Philadelphia police officers who are accused of robbing dealers of large sums of drugs and cash, beating them to get information, planting evidence and lying in court to win unjust convictions. The defense then began its case by questioning FBI agents about the evolving story told by star government witness Jeffrey Walker, a disgraced member of the elite undercover unit. Prosecutors built their case on Walker's testimony and that of a string of admitted or suspected drug dealers. Walker admitted that he routinely stole money and valuables during illegal drug raids, which he said was standard procedure in the undercover unit r




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