• United lures top fliers with promise of a hot meal

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — To win the hearts of frequent business travelers, United Airlines is going through their stomachs. The carrier has been looking for ways to woo back some of its top fliers who defected to other carriers following a rocky merger with Continental Airlines. So, it's upgrading first class food options and replacing snacks with full meals on some of its shortest flights. The changes, announced Thursday, mean that instead of potato chips, chocolate chip cookies and bananas, passengers on flights of at least 800 miles will get meals such as chicken and mozzarella on a tomato focaccia roll and turkey and Swiss cheese on a cranberry baguette. Currently, meals are only served on flights of 900 miles or more — trips

  • Average US 30-year mortgage rate at 4.10 pct

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates declined this week, with the 30-year loan rate hitting its 52-week low. Mortgage company Freddie Mac said Thursday the nationwide average for a 30-year mortgage fell to 4.10 percent from 4.12 percent last week. The average for a 15-year mortgage, a popular choice for people who are refinancing, slipped to 3.23 percent from 3.24 percent. Mortgage rates have fallen in recent weeks after climbing last summer when the Federal Reserve began talking about reducing the monthly bond purchases it was making to keep long-term borrowing rates low. Mortgage rates often follow the yield on the 10-year Treasury note. The 10-year note traded at 2.43 percent Wednesday, close to

  • Correction: XGR--Coal Ash story

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — In a story Aug. 20 about new North Carolina legislation addressing Duke Energy coal ash deposits, The Associated Press reported erroneously the length of time the company has to remove the ash at four sites considered to be at the highest risk. Duke Energy must act within five years, not 15 years. A corrected version of the story is below: NC legislators approve regulating toxic coal ash NC lawmakers pass regulations for toxic coal ash after massive spill soiled 70 miles of river By EMERY P. DALESIO and MITCH WEISS Associated Press RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina lawmakers Wednesday praised new legislation they say will regulate coal-ash pits and clean up decades of toxic w

  • Ex-Virginia governor talks about troubled marriage

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Former Gov. Bob McDonnell wrote a long, forlorn email to his wife three years ago trying to save his marriage, calling her his "soulmate," yet he also said he grew so weary of her yelling that he began taking refuge in his office late at night rather than go home. McDonnell testified extensively about his troubled marriage Thursday at his public corruption trial. He and his wife, Maureen, are charged with accepting more than $165,000 in gifts and loans from former Star Scientific Inc. CEO Jonnie Williams in exchange for promoting his company's dietary supplements. The McDonnells say their marriage was broken and that they were barely speaking, let alone engaged in a criminal conspiracy.

  • Family Dollar rejects Dollar General offer

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    Family Dollar has rejected a takeover bid from dollar-store competitor Dollar General, saying it would be too hard for the deal to pass antitrust regulators. Family Dollar's board said it supports its existing deal to be acquired by Dollar Tree. Family Dollar Stores Inc. Chairman and CEO Howard Levine said in a statement Thursday that its board and advisers reviewed Dollar General Corp.'s offer and determined it wasn't reasonably likely to be completed on the terms proposed. Dollar General Chairman and CEO Rick Dreiling said in a statement that the company was disappointed in Family Dollar's decision, and that it had done an extensive antitrust analysis that confirmed its proposal could be completed.

  • Nixon orders withdrawal of Guard from Ferguson

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Jay Nixon is ordering the Missouri National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson, where nightly scenes of unrest have erupted since a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old. Nixon announced what he called a systematic withdrawal of Guard officers on Thursday. He says they've effectively protected the city while other agencies worked to restore trust between law enforcement and residents. Since the guard's arrival Monday, flare-ups in the small section of town that had been the center of nightly unrest have begun to subside. The quietest night was overnight Wednesday and Thursday, when police arrested only a handful of people in the protest zone. Since demonstration

  • Nixon orders withdrawal of Guard from Ferguson

    Published: Thu, Aug 21, 2014

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Jay Nixon is ordering the Missouri National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson, where nightly scenes of unrest have erupted since a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old. Nixon announced what he called a systematic withdrawl of Guard officers on Thursday. He says they’ve effectively protected the city while other agencies worked to restore trust between law enforcement and residents. Since the guard’s arrival Monday, flare-ups in the small section of town that had been the center of nightly unrest have begun to subside. The quietest night was overnight Wednesday and Thursday, when police arrested only a handful of people in the protest zone. Since

  • New restrictions on hydrocodone to take effect

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S. The new rules mean that drugs like Vicodin, Lortab and their generic equivalents will be subject to the same prescribing rules as painkillers like codeine and oxycodone. Patients will be limited to one 90-day supply of medication and will have to see a health care professional to get a refill. In many states, only doctors will be able to prescribe the medications, not nurses or physician assistants.

  • Stocks move higher; S&P 500 at record high

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks were on pace for a fourth straight day of gains Thursday, putting the Standard & Poor's 500 index on track to beat its record high close set last month. Investors were encouraged by a report that the number of people seeking unemployment benefits remains at a multi-year low. Hewlett-Packard rose after delivering better results, while Sears plunged after reporting that its loss doubled from a year ago. Trading remains light with many investors out on vacation. KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average was up 82 points, or 0.5 percent, to 17,061 as of 1:54 p.m. Eastern. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose seven points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,993. That's six points above the record high of 1,987.98 i

  • Vet who simulates homelessness for a month says effects are like PTSD

    Lane Anderson, Deseret News | Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    Tom Rebman tried being homeless for a month; says it's "worse than he ever imagined."

  • Family of slain informant wins judgment over death

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Supreme Court has reinstated a damage award to the family of a teenage informant killed while working for police, but lowered the amount the state must pay. The high court found that Kentucky State Police detectives made inexcusable mistakes in their handling of 17-year-old LeBron Gaither in the hours and days leading up to his death in July 1996. Gaither was killed on a drive between Nelson and Taylor counties while trying to execute a drug buy that would lead to an arrest. Troopers lost track of the car he was riding in. The high court on Thursday ordered the Kentucky Board of Claims to pay $148,787 to the Gaither's family. The award initially was $168,000 but a trial court overtu

  • Bodies of 3 climbers retrieved from Mount Rainier

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    SEATTLE (AP) — The location of the three bodies was revealed by the melting snow, but getting to them was another matter. They were high on a glacier at one of the most treacherous spots on Mount Rainier, an area pummeled by falling ice and rocks. So rangers borrowed a tool from their colleagues at Denali National Park in Alaska — a mechanical claw that's so highly specialized it hasn't been used in years. A helicopter equipped with the device plucked the bodies of the three climbers off Mount Rainier on Tuesday, in the same area where a party of six vanished last May. "We've talked about using it before, but never really had a need for it," said Doug Uttecht, the chief pilot at Olympia-based NorthWest Helicopters,

  • St. Louis police release video of shooting

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — The St. Louis police chief has released 911 audio, surveillance video and cellphone video of the fatal shooting of a knife-wielding man, acknowledging that tensions in nearby Ferguson have created a need for greater transparency on officer-involved shootings. Police Chief Sam Dotson says both officers involved in the shooting remain on administrative duty pending investigations. Kajieme Powell was shot to death Tuesday. The cellphone video shows him moving toward officers with a knife while telling them, "Shoot me now. Kill me now." Both officers fired six shots. Powell died at the scene. Dotson says the officers could not use stun guns because Powell was wearing a jacket that could have deflected the

  • Deals only a click away for back-to-school season

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — It's mid-August, and parents are scrambling to outfit their kids with backpacks, gadgets and jeans as the clock winds down toward the first day of school. But don't fret. This season, stores are offering new services and apps to cater to time-starved, smartphone-savvy parents to help them save time and money during the annual shopping ritual. The gimmicks include new twists on price matching, more choices for same-day delivery and expanded selections online. "It's a lot easier to find a deal," said Michael Londrigan, dean of academic affairs at LIM College, a fashion college in New York. "It's saving customers a ton of time. It's allowing them to uncover hidden treasures that they wouldn't be able to d

  • Foley's death isn't changing views in Congress

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For all its horror, the beheading of an American journalist in Syria appears unlikely to change lawmakers' minds about military intervention against Islamic State extremists. It's equally unclear whether the Obama administration will be asking them to back a new U.S. approach. President Barack Obama said the United States wouldn't scale back its military posture in Iraq in response to James Foley's killing. But he offered no specifics Wednesday about what new steps he might take to protect additional captives and other Americans, and ward off what he described as the al-Qaida offshoot's genocidal ambitions. The initial response from members of Congress was mixed, reflecting the divide of the American peopl

  • Greek archaeology site sparks intense interest

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Archaeologists excavating a large burial mound in northern Greece that has captivated the public's imagination have asked politicians and others seeking guided tours of the site to leave them in peace. The Culture Ministry appealed Thursday for "understanding" while the Amphipolis excavation proceeds. The partially uncovered tomb from the end of Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great's reign, which was found inside the mound, has sparked intense media interest amid wild speculation that it may contain rich treasures or the bones of an ancient celebrity. Alexander inherited the throne of Macedonia, in northern Greece, from where he set off to conquer a vast empire reaching India. He died in 323 B.

  • Retail gasoline prices drop a penny across Texas

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    IRVING, Texas (AP) — Retail gasoline prices across Texas have slipped by a penny this week. AAA Texas on Thursday reported the average price at the pump fell to $3.28. The average price fell by 3 cents last week and now is down by 14 cents compared to the same time last year. Nationwide gasoline prices stand at $3.44, down from $3.47 last week. El Paso has the most expensive gasoline in Texas this week at $3.36 per gallon. The association survey found Amarillo with the cheapest at $3.17 per gallon. AAA says gas prices are trending downward because of stable global supplies that are not being affected by tensions in Iraq, Ukraine and elsewhere.

  • 5 things to know about case against Texas' Perry

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — In the week since he was indicted for abuse of power and public coercion, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and his supporters have insisted the charges against the Republican governor are politically motivated. Perry has pleaded not guilty and continues to campaign in advance of the 2016 presidential race. As Perry heads to New Hampshire for the weekend, here are five things to know about his case: ___ THE PUBLIC INTEGRITY UNIT The indictments stem from Perry's veto last year of $7.5 million in funding for the unit responsible for investigating public corruption in Texas. The Public Integrity Unit is part of the Travis County district attorney's office, which is headed by a Democrat, District Attorney

  • Man charged with leaving 3 kids in car outside bar

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    OCALA, Fla. (AP) — Police say a Florida man is accused of leaving his three children in a car for hours outside a bar while he got drunk inside. A police report says an officer found 28-year-old Joshua Delong outside of Dr. B's bar in Ocala just after 2 a.m. Thursday with a bleeding head. A security guard told officers that an angry patron punched Delong before he was arrested on child endangerment charges. Witnesses told police that Delong left his children ages 5, 7 and 8 in a gold Cadillac parked outside while he drank at the bar. Police say the kids were honking the horn and calling for "daddy" and that the bar's security guard eventually called police when he tried to drive away with the kids.

  • Bank of America agrees to nearly $17B settlement

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The government has reached a $16.65 billion settlement with Bank of America over its role in the sale of mortgage-backed securities in the run-up to the financial crisis, the Justice Department announced Thursday. The deal calls for the bank, the second-largest in the U.S., to pay a $5 billion cash penalty, another $4.6 billion in remediation payments and provide about $7 billion in relief to struggling homeowners. The settlement is by far the largest deal the Justice Department has reached with a bank over the 2008 mortgage meltdown. In the last year, JPMorgan Chase & Co. agreed to a $13 billion settlement while Citigroup reached a separate $7 billion deal.