• Emergency response adapts to remote ND oil patch

    Yesterday

    MANDAREE, N.D. (AP) — Troy Easton traded his career as a flight paramedic for a drilling rig job in Wyoming six years ago, pulling in three times what he used to make. From Texas to Wyoming's hilly gas patch, he noticed that much of the nation's resurgent oil and gas industry's activity was taking place in remote areas. That worried the paramedic in him. "I started thinking what if I get hurt? Where's the ambulance?" he said. One day he had to drive himself to the hospital — an hour away — with symptoms of a heart attack. It turned out to be an arrhythmia from which he recovered. It was an inspiration for his current position as owner of Easton Health and Safety, whose paramedics serve remote oil facilities.

  • News Guide: Steyer writes $15M to his super PAC

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The political parties, their campaign committees and some of their super PACs faced a Saturday deadline to disclose how much donors gave and how much operatives spent in August. Highlights from the filings: ___ BILLIONAIRES STILL OPENING WALLETS Hedge fund executive Tom Steyer continued to funnel cash from his personal fortune to his pro-environment super PAC, NextGen Climate Action. Steyer in August wrote his federal committee a $15 million check as it ramps up a political operation to help candidates who pledge to back legislation fighting climate change. Steyer has now given $26.6 million this cycle to his efforts, bankrolling it almost entirely on his own.

  • House campaign committees sitting on $100M in bank

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The two party committees tasked with electing House members are sitting on a combined $100 million pile of cash, suggesting voters in the handful of competitive districts will face an onslaught of late political advertising. The National Republican Congressional Committee on Saturday reported raising more than $4 million last month and banking almost $46 million. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee last week announced it raised more than $10 million and has almost $55 million ready to help its candidates. Democrats have now outraised the Republicans in 18 of the last 20 months despite long odds of tipping control of the chamber away from Republicans.

  • Ex-Utah teacher to trial on student sex charges

    Yesterday

    FARMINGTON, Utah (AP) — A 35-year-old former Utah high school teacher accused of having sexual relationships with two of her former students has been ordered to stand trial on additional charges of rape and forcible sodomy. One of the teenage boys offered graphic details during his testimony at a preliminary hearing on Friday about how he went from being Brianne Altice's English student to allegedly having sex with her in his Farmington home. The teen testified that he was 17 years old when a relationship with Altice took place between April and June of last year, according to The Salt Lake Tribune (http://tinyurl.com/l2wleze ). He says it began with kissing between class periods and eventually led to intercourse.

  • AP PHOTOS: Refugees stream into Turkey from Syria

    Yesterday

    SURUC, Turkey (AP) — Lugging sacks of belongings, hobbling on crutches, carrying children on their hip, more than 60,000 mostly Kurdish refugees in Syria have streamed across the dusty and barren border into Turkey, desperately seeking safety after Islamic State militants attacked their villages. The large-scale displacement of so many and the movement of the Kurdish fighters into Syria reflected the ferocity of the fighting in the northern Kobani area, which borders Turkey, prompted hundreds of Kurdish fighters to rush to the area and Kurdish leaders to plead for international help. Civilians began massing on the Turkish border on Thursday. Turkey did not let them in at first, saying it would provide them with aid on the S

  • Family of man shot by police invite chief to rally

    Yesterday

    RICHMOND, Calif. (AP) — The family of a Northern California man who was shot and killed by a police officer is scheduled to hold a rally and memorial, and the police chief has been invited to attend. Family members of 24-year-old Richard "Pedie" Perez will be holding the event Saturday afternoon at a public park in Richmond. Richmond Police Capt. Mark Gagan (GAY'-gen) says Perez was fatally shot while trying to grab the gun of Officer Wallace Jensen outside a liquor store on Sept. 14. John Burris, an attorney representing Perez's family, says several witnesses dispute the police's account regarding the shooting and he plans to sue the department and the officer.

  • City cites drought, sinks LA water slide proposal

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles city officials have pulled the plug on plans to temporarily transform a downtown street into a giant water slide because of drought. The Bureau of Street Services killed the plan Friday after complaints that the event would waste precious water. It also frowned on a proposal to use the leftover water to irrigate Griffith Park. An organizer of the Sept. 28 event apologized to the thousands who signed up. The padded slide would have used 15,000 to 20,000 gallons to send participants slipping several blocks between courthouses and past City Hall. A Public Works spokesman says the water department thought the event was a bad idea at a time when conservation is being promoted.

  • Oculus unveils new prototype VR headset

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Oculus has unveiled a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. However, the VR company still isn't ready to release a consumer edition. The hew headset intended for creators of VR experiences is nicknamed Crescent Bay and features a higher resolution and refresh rate, integrated headphones and 360-degree head tracking. "That was not easy," Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe told the audience Saturday at the company's first-ever developers conference. "It's still not perfect. None of this is perfect yet, but it's much, much better." Oculus' headset covers a user's eyes and can create immersive worlds that react to head movement.

  • Sierra Leone staggers in Ebola isolation effort

    Yesterday

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Some in Sierra Leone ran away from their homes Saturday and others clashed with health workers trying to bury dead Ebola victims as the country struggled through the second day of an unprecedented lockdown to combat the deadly disease. Despite these setbacks, officials said most of Sierra Leone's 6 million people were complying with orders to stay at home as nearly 30,000 volunteers and health care workers fanned out across the country to distribute soap and information on how to prevent Ebola. The virus, spread by contact with bodily fluids, has killed than 560 people in Sierra Leone and more than 2,600 in West Africa since the outbreak began last December, according to the World Health Organi

  • Polly Bergen, versatile actress, singer dies at 84

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — Emmy-winning actress and singer Polly Bergen, who in a long career played the terrorized wife in the original "Cape Fear" and the first woman president in "Kisses for My President," died Saturday, according to her publicist. She was 84. Bergen died at her home in Southbury, Connecticut, from natural causes, said publicist Judy Katz, surrounded by family and close friends. A brunette beauty with a warm, sultry singing voice, Bergen was a household name from her 20s onward. She made albums and played leading roles in films, stage musicals and TV dramas. She also hosted her own variety series, was a popular game show panelist, and founded a thriving beauty products company that bore her name.

  • Fire captain injured in ice bucket challenge dies

    Yesterday

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A central Kentucky firefighter injured in an "ice bucket challenge" has died a month after a power line shocked him and another man. Campbellsville Fire Chief Kyle Smith says 41-year-old Tony Grider died Saturday. Grider was a captain with the department on Aug. 21. He and 22-year-old firefighter Simon Quinn were on the fire truck's ladder when it got too close to a power line after dumping water on Campbellsville University's marching band in the charity stunt to raise awareness for the disease ALS. Quinn was released from the hospital Sept. 15. Two other firefighters were injured, but were released from the hospital.

  • Buffer zone agreed upon in Ukrainian peace talks

    Yesterday

    MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Sporadic artillery fire hit parts of eastern Ukraine on Saturday, hours after negotiators agreed to create a buffer zone between government troops and pro-Russian militants by halting their advances, pulling back heavy weapons and withdrawing foreign fighters. Despite positive developments coming out of talks in the Belarusian capital of Minsk and a cease-fire that has been in place since Sept. 5, the fighting between the two sides was still deadly. In Donetsk, the largest rebel-held city, strong explosions could be heard from a munitions factory that a local official said was hit by an artillery shell. It was unclear which side fired it. Explosions were heard in three areas of the city in the afternoo

  • Inspectors make sure businesses measure up

    Yesterday

    AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Fresh from comparing his stopwatch to the timed cycles on several dryers at an East Akron Laundromat, Dale Minninger was approached at his truck by Doug Moore. Moore, who lives in Ellet, stops by weekly to do his laundry and had seen Minninger, supervisor of the Summit County Weights & Measures Division, timing the dryers. Moore went outside to tell Minninger he appreciated the job he was doing, watching out for consumers. "I didn't know they were watching nickels and dimes with stopwatches and all," Moore told a reporter who was shadowing Minninger for part of the day. "At least when I'm putting in eight minutes, I know I'm getting eight minutes.

  • Prosecutors look to new DNA testing in twin cases

    Yesterday

    BOSTON (AP) — Prosecutors in Boston were forced to put a rape suspect on trial three times before jurors were willing to convict him a decade ago. It wasn't due a lack of evidence, but because the suspect was an identical twin. Similar cases have popped up elsewhere, illustrating the challenges of prosecuting a twin. Because identical twins come from a single fertilized egg, standard DNA testing has not been able to differentiate between them. But Boston prosecutors who have struggled twice in the last decade with such cases believe they have a new tool to persuade jurors: cutting-edge DNA testing they say can distinguish between identical twins.

  • Lack of trust keeps Iran, US away from coalition

    Yesterday

    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran and the United States share a common enemy in the Islamic State militant group, but a deep-seated lack of trust has so far kept the longtime foes from publicly joining hands in a coalition to defeat the extremists. Their inability to work together complicates efforts to beat back the extremists that both Washington and Tehran see as a threat, and has left Iraq's new government — which considers both countries allies — scratching its head as it tries to tackle the most serious threat to its stability since American troops left in 2011. Iraq's new prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, made his frustration clear in a recent interview with The Associated Press, saying U.S.

  • 5 things to know about UN Climate Summit

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — New York will be at the epicenter of the climate change debate next week. More than 120 world leaders will attend a one-day summit on Tuesday at the United Nations on climate. Tens of thousands are expected to march to call for action on global warming. Dozens of other events are planned throughout the city as part of Climate Week NYC. Here are 5 things you need to know: 1. THE SUMMIT IS NOT PART OF THE FORMAL NEGOTIATION PROCESS FOR A NEW TREATY. The one-day summit was organized by U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon as a way to galvanize political momentum for a new international treaty, but it falls outside the formal negotiation process under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

  • Jailed, some mentally ill inmates land in lockdown

    Yesterday

    Day or night, the lights inside cell 135C of central New Mexico's Valencia County Detention Center were always on. Locked inside, alone, for a total of eight months, Jan Green says she heard the constant drip of water from a broken showerhead, pitting the concrete floor where she curled up on a sleeping pad. When she was awake, Green — a 52-year-old computer technician diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder — rocked back and forth on a three-foot bench, hour after hour, confiding in an imaginary companion. "I didn't have a calendar or a pencil. I didn't have anything. So ... I pretended I had a friend in there with me," says Green. "I would talk and hold conversations just in my little crazy world, I guess you

  • Potential push for Obama to expand military effort

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's military campaign against the Islamic State group already has extended beyond the limits he first outlined. But military experts inside and outside the administration argue that an even greater expansion may be needed for the mission to succeed, including positioning U.S. ground troops with front-line Iraqi security forces. Doing that could put Obama close to violating his pledge to keep Americans out of combat. For Obama, re-engaging in combat in Iraq would mean going back on promises about the current mission and undercutting a pillar of his presidency — ending long wars and avoid new ones. If commanders request ground troops and he turns them down, Obama could be a

  • Journal aims to stoke interest in Midwest history

    Yesterday

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — When T.V. Golden set out to bring a modern irrigation system to parched northwestern Nebraska in the late 19th century, some of the more established settlers objected, fearing that acknowledging the problem would stanch the flow of immigrants who had turned the area into a "young Ireland." Golden, whose parents were among the thousands of settlers who had fled Ireland's crushing poverty and famine, prevailed, and his irrigation system helped convert the area's arid prairie into the fecund farmland it is today. The vignette is one of several told in a new journal devoted to the history of the Midwest and Plains — an area of study that the journal's creators believe has been neglected. The inaugural editi

  • Astronauts getting 3-D printer at space station

    Yesterday

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The 3-D printing boom is about to invade space. NASA is sending a 3-D printer to the International Space Station in hopes that astronauts will be able to one day fix their spacecraft by cranking out spare parts on the spot. The printer, made by a Northern California company called Made in Space, is among more than 5,000 pounds of space station cargo that's stuffed into a SpaceX Dragon capsule that was supposed to lift off before dawn Saturday. Rainy weather forced SpaceX to delay the launch until Sunday. Besides real-time replacement parts at the station, NASA envisions astronauts, in the decades ahead, making entire habitats at faraway destinations like Mars.