• Dominican Republic Tropical Weather

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    A couple sits on the Santo Domingo sea wall as Tropical Storm Erika approaches the Dominican Republic, Friday, August 28, 2015. Tropical Storm Erika began to lose steam Friday over the Dominican Republic, but it left behind a trail of destruction that included several people killed on the small eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, authorities said.

  • Lions Jaguars Football

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    An American flag and palm trees blow in the wind of a passing thunder storm at EverBank Field before the first half of an NFL preseason football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Detroit Lions, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Jacksonville, Fla. (AP Photo/Stephen B.

  • The Latest: Tropical Storm Erica expected to be downgraded

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — The latest on storm preparations for Erika (all times local): 5:25 p.m.: The National Hurricane Center said during its 5 p.m. forecast that Tropical Storm Erika is forecast to weaken into a tropical depression. During the Friday night announcement, meteorologists said they expect Erika to be downgraded to a depression Saturday. There's even a possibility that the storm could dissipate to a trough of low pressure during or after its passage over Hispaniola. Officials say there's "a significant chance" that no watches or warnings for Florida will be required over the weekend. ___ 3:20 p.m. Emergency planners on the Georgia coast are taking precautions in case Tropical

  • Katrina Bush

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    Former Mississippi first lady Marsha Barbour kisses her husband after she praised the first responders on the Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina at a First Responders Remembrance, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015 in Gulfport, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V.

  • Erika Storm Preparations

    Yesterday

    Rosa Monzon loads water bottles into her car as she prepares for Tropical Storm Erika Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Hialeah, Fla. Gov. Rick Scott said Friday that Tropical Storm Erika poses a "severe threat to the entire state" and declared state of emergency. Scott made his declaration shortly after forecasters adjusted the trajectory of the storm to show that it's predicted to strike the southern tip of the state and then traverse northward.

  • Northwest fire crews hope for a break in the weather

    Yesterday

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Northwest fire officials told U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack that incoming cooler weather could help calm the massive blazes that threaten thousands of homes, but wind storms may cause extreme fire behavior in the interim. Vilsack, in Portland Friday for a wildfire briefing, said 14,000 homes in Oregon and Washington are currently at risk and the Forest Service is spending $10 million a day for fire suppression in the region. As the warm weather is being replaced this week by cooler conditions from the Pacific Ocean, the cold front could bring rain to western Oregon this weekend, but the transition to the cold front will also bring strong winds across eastern Washington and northeastern Oregon.

  • Associated Press photographers reflect on Katrina coverage

    Yesterday

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — With Hurricane Katrina headed for the Gulf Coast in late August 2005, The Associated Press deployed dozens of staffers to support its New Orleans and Mississippi bureaus. Here, three of the photographers who covered the story talk about their experiences and some of the photos that were the most meaningful to them. ___ NATIVE SON Bill Haber and another AP photographer, the late Dave Martin, had been shooting around the city during the storm when they noticed water bubbling up from the sewers — an ominous sign of the flooding to come. Driving out toward eastern New Orleans where they'd heard the inundation was intense, they stopped on an overpass from which they could see Canal Street.

  • Will Tropical Storm Erika hit Florida? Many factors at play

    Yesterday

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Tropical Storm Erika has the potential to rake Florida's west coast with heavy rains starting late Sunday or early Monday. Although the storm's path and intensity are a bit uncertain, Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency on Friday for the entire state. Officials say residents should prepare by filling vehicles' gas tanks, stockpiling a few days' of food and water, and determining whether they live in an evacuation zone. Meteorologists at the National Hurricane Center in Miami say several factors come into play over the next 24 hours that will determine whether Erika is little more than a rainstorm for the Sunshine State.

  • Katrina-scattered families rebuild separately and together

    Yesterday

    HOUSTON (AP) — Bunk beds dominate the narrow living room of Chevelle Washington's modest three-bedroom brick townhouse apartment. A large box in the corner is piled high with kids' shoes. The 51-year-old is raising six of her grandchildren. Her home is a refuge, a haven. It was that way back in her native New Orleans, too — never so much as on Aug. 29, 2005, when Hurricane Katrina struck. "I had 21 people at my house," she says of that horrible night. "They came to my house for shelter, because I had an up- and downstairs." The water rushing through the city's breached floodwalls climbed all 17 of those front stairs, stopping just below the porch. It had receded to the 11th step by the following day, when a uniforme

  • SC officials partially open state emergency center for Erika

    Yesterday

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The South Carolina Emergency Management Division says it has partially activated its emergency center as officials watch Tropical Storm Erika. Division director Kim Stenson said in a statement that he hopes the storm avoids South Carolina. But he says residents should review their preparation plans, especially along the South Carolina coast. Forecasters say there is still much uncertainty with the storm's forecast. Current projections have Erika making landfall on the southwest coast of Florida and moving inland toward South Carolina. Emergency officials have told key agencies in South Carolina to be ready to respond if needed.

  • US Open fans get break from sun, but not yet rain, in Ashe

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. Open spectators must wait out rain delays at Arthur Ashe Stadium for one more year. In the meantime, they're getting a break from Mother Nature in a very different way: shade from the blazing sun. A framework of more than 6,500 tons of steel now sits atop center court for the Grand Slam tournament. In 2016, it will support a retractable roof, the culmination of a project that requires two years to complete. Two of the four sides were covered during the first phase of construction, creating newfound shade for many fans in the upper deck who used to bake on steamy days. With warm weather and mostly clear skies in the forecast for the first few days once the Open starts Monday, that could make a difference

  • The Latest: Former President Bush arrives in Mississippi

    Yesterday

    GULFPORT, Miss. (AP) — The latest on former President George W. Bush's trip to New Orleans and Gulfport, Mississippi, to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina (all times local): 1 p.m. Former President George W. Bush has arrived in Gulfport, Mississippi, where hundreds of people gathered in a beachside park to salute emergency responders who worked during and after Hurricane Katrina. Bush spoke Friday, saluting then-Gov. Haley Barbour, as well as U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker and former Sen. Trent Lott. Bush says that during Katrina and its aftermath, there was "an impressive display of leadership down here on the Gulf Coast.

  • Tropical Storm Preparations

    Yesterday

    Miami-Dade County personnel keep an eye on the latest information on Tropical Storm Erika at the Miami-Dade State Emergency Operations Center, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Doral, Fla. Gov. Rick Scott said that Tropical Storm Erika poses a "severe threat to the entire state" and declared a state of emergency. Scott made his declaration shortly after forecasters adjusted the trajectory of the storm to show that it's predicted to strike the southern tip of the state and then traverse northward.

  • Clean-up ensues in Phoenix following intense thunderstorms

    Yesterday

    PHOENIX (AP) — Metropolitan Phoenix is picking up the pieces the morning after thunderstorms knocked down trees and utility poles. Crews were working Friday morning in various suburbs to restore power to thousands of residents as well as replace power poles. Arizona Public Service says only about 225 customers remain without service, down from 10,500 during Thursday afternoon's storm. Workers in Tempe and east Phoenix are clearing trees and debris from roads. Residents at a northern Phoenix mobile home park are also cleaning up after dust storms tore through awnings and sheds. According to the National Weather Service, Tempe saw the most rain with 0.79 inches. Suburbs west of Phoenix saw as much as 0.87 in

  • Okanogan wildfire grows by 22 square miles

    Yesterday

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The largest wildfire ever recorded in Washington state history had grown by more than 22 square miles Friday and firefighters were worried about high winds predicted for the weekend. The Okanogan fires had burned 472 square miles. It was only 12 percent contained after windy conditions Thursday. Officials say the fire had destroyed at least 45 primary residences, 49 cabins and 60 outbuildings. Three firefighters have died battling the fire. A memorial service was planned Sunday in Wenatchee. Fire spokeswoman Sierra Hellstrom said temperatures were lower and humidity higher on Friday — conditions expected to slow the fire. However, lightning and high winds predicted for the weekend could s

  • Sioux Falls Flooding

    Yesterday

    A torrent of water rushes through the typically mild waterfalls of Falls Park in Sioux Falls on Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, after flash floods hit the city over night. Some parts of the city got over 7 inches, more than twice the forecast rainfall.

  • APTOPIX Katrina Bush

    Yesterday

    Former President George W. Bush dances with band director Asia Muhaimin as the band plays, during a visit to Warren Easton Charter High School in New Orleans, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015. Bush is in town to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which is Saturday.

  • Flash flooding impacts homes, motorists in Sioux Falls

    Yesterday

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — More than half a foot of rain fell in parts of Sioux Falls, leading to flash flooding that inundated basements, stranded dozens of motorists and cut electricity to thousands of homes. Mayor Mike Huether said infrastructure improvements in recent years kept the rainfall from being even more disruptive, "but more work needs to be done," he said. "You're going to have challenges when get 2 or 3 inches of rain an hour over several hours," said Huether, "but we've had worse challenges and we'll get through this like we do with every other challenge that faces this city." No injuries were immediately reported in the late Thursday storm, but several people had to be rescued from submerged vehicles.

  • Firefighters at Oregon wildfire prepare for windy weather

    Yesterday

    GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — Structural fire crews have returned to protect homes on a wildfire in eastern Oregon as National Guard and other fire crews worked to reinforce lines against winds forecast to be gusting up to 40 mph. The Canyon Creek fire complex covered 135 square miles Friday. It is located south of John Day mostly on the Malheur National Forest. Spokeswoman Stefanie Gatchell says the cold front bringing rain to western Oregon this weekend will bring thunderstorms and gusty winds to the fire, so crews are working to reinforce their lines. Smoke made air quality very unhealthy in John Day, but was moderate to good across most of the state.

  • Florida keeps eye on Tropical Storm Erika, could hit Monday

    Yesterday

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — All of Florida is carefully watching Tropical Storm Erika as the disorganized system makes its way over Hispaniola. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami said that as of 11 a.m. Friday, the forecast showed the storm hitting the state Monday. The forecast path has Erika skirting the state's Gulf Coast and then moving up Florida's spine north of Tampa. The next 24 hours will be critical in the storm's development, hurricane center meteorologist James Franklin said. "The trend is for a gradual lessening," he said. "Yesterday we were talking about a hurricane; today we're talking about a tropical storm." There's still uncertainty in the track because Hispaniola's mountains




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