Movie review: 'Loneliest Planet'

The story of young engaged Americans hiking across the Caucasus Mountains in the former Soviet republic of Georgia pivots on a horrible, spontaneous lapse of judgment, but then Loktev lets all the tension out of a situation.
Oklahoman Modified: January 10, 2013 at 6:00 pm •  Published: January 11, 2013

With her big eyes, open face and shock of fluorescent fuchsia hair, Furstenberg is an obvious focal point for Loktev, but the director seems to prefer almost anything else to developing her characters or letting them respond to the inciting action. She periodically pulls back for long shots of the travelers, ambling far away on grassy mountains, possibly to show how alone they are or their insignificance amid all this landscape. But the viewer can only infer these things, because “The Loneliest Planet” is so rambling and willfully obscure that it utterly fails to make a point or create a case for caring.

George Lang