Share “MSU developing chestnut rot detection system”

MSU developing chestnut rot detection system

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 2, 2013 at 3:02 am •  Published: January 2, 2013

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Researchers at Michigan State University are developing a way to tell if chestnuts are rotten without opening them.

To help assure that chestnuts reach market in good condition, the research team is working to create a noninvasive method of detecting internal decay in the fruit.

They're involved in assessing the various imaging techniques currently available.

So far, it seems that CT scans work better than X-rays, MRIs and other techniques.

Known as CT, computerized tomography combines a series of X-rays taken from different angles and computer processing to create cross-sectional images.

The U.S. produces only about 1 percent of the world's chestnuts, and Michigan is the national leader.



Project details:


  1. 1
    Former OSU student convicted of manslaughter in 2009 fatal car crash released on bail; attorney...
  2. 2
    Police find dead body in porta-potty outside Cincinnati Bengals' Paul Brown Stadium
  3. 3
    Several Deer Creek schools on lockdown due to report of suspicious person
  4. 4
    Tulsa mother gets three life sentences, father 25 years in 'horrific' child abuse case
  5. 5
    Man who calls police to say he's 'too high,' found in pile of Doritos
+ show more


× Trending business Article