Murray hasn't heard of any US Open boycott plans

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 21, 2013 at 8:08 am •  Published: January 21, 2013
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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Andy Murray says he hasn't heard of any plans for a boycott of the U.S. Open over an added day without extra compensation.

The tournament is moving to a Monday men's final.

"I know that the ATP are not particularly happy with the Monday final. I know that's an issue because however much revenue they make from having an extra day on their tournament hasn't really reflected in the increase in the prize money," Murray said Monday after his fourth-round win over Gilles Simon at the Australian Open.

"Since the player meeting, I haven't discussed with any of the players what was said there, what the plans are," Murray said.

He said the players have been advocating for increased prize money, but not with an additional day of play.

"I think that's what they're disappointed with," said Murray, who won his only Grand Slam title at the 2012 U.S. Open. "But I personally haven't spoken with anyone about boycotting the event."

"I don't want to go into that here at all, not the place for it," he added. "Got the second week of a Slam to focus on. Can discuss that after the event. "

Last year, organizers of the Australian Open were also faced with the threat of a player strike, in part due to discontent over how prize money was distributed at the major tournaments.

The Australian Open responded by taking the lead among Grand Slams in increasing prize money this year, making it the richest event.

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EGO CHECK: Martina Navratilova says only a "big ego" could have driven Lance Armstrong to lie about doping for so many years, and she thinks he should never be allowed to compete in any sport again.

The 18-time Grand Slam singles champion said she didn't watch Armstrong's TV interview with Oprah Winfrey, during which he admitted to doping while winning seven Tour de France titles, because she'd already made up her mind about him.

"There is no justification for what he did," Navratilova said. "Lying about it with such conviction for so many years, suing people and winning and just denying it so many times. I mean, it takes some serious ego to be able to do that. Clearly, he has a big ego.

"He should never be able to compete anywhere at any level. If it was just a one-time deal, OK, but every year he raced, he was cheating. It's unimaginable."

Navratilova is in Melbourne to play in the Australian Open legends doubles event.

She's confident tennis is a clean sport, but thinks anti-doping authorities should be giving players blood tests on a more consistent basis.

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