Music review: Art Garfunkel, 'The Singer'

Art Garfunkel takes the spotlight on the sweet and powerful “The Singer.”
BY GENE TRIPLETT etriplett@opubco.com Published: September 7, 2012

POP

Art Garfunkel “The Singer” (Columbia/Legacy)

“Bridge Over Troubled Water” was one of Paul Simon's greatest songwriting achievements, but only his nonwriting vocal partner — with that angelic tenor that could soar from intimate baritone to highflying falsetto with the ease of a graceful bird — could have put it across with the emotional power that was needed to make it a classic.

Although it became the title song of the last new studio album released by Simon & Garfunkel, Art Garfunkel sang it alone, and it is arguably the best vocal performance of his career, so it's fitting that this hymn of comfort to a troubled heart was chosen as the opening track of “The Singer,” a 34-song, 2-CD collection of Garfunkel's best work with Simon and as an underappreciated solo artist.

The songs, curated by the artist himself, date from Simon & Garfunkel's 1964 folk-pop album debut, “Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.” (“The Sound of Silence”), through Garfunkel's 2007 solo collection of Great American Songbook covers, “Some Enchanted Evening” (“Some Enchanted Evening,” “I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face”).

Although Simon was the writer of the pair, Garfunkel did receive composing credit for writing the poem “Canticle” for “Scarborough Fair/Canticle,” and was responsible for most of the vocal arrangements they recorded together, which here include such melancholy mesmerizers as “April Come She Will,” “So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright” and a stunning live version of “For Emily, Wherever I May Find Her.”