Mustang man has invented a fishing gadget that he hopes will outshine the others

by Ed Godfrey Modified: April 21, 2012 at 11:20 pm •  Published: April 21, 2012
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The fishing industry is full of gadgets and a Mustang man thinks his invention of a bite indicator light for night fishing is an improvement on all similar gadgets.

Jason Nelson earns a paycheck as a computer programmer and software developer. In his spare time, he likes to fish.

“I've fished my whole life,” Nelson said. “I grew up with a farm pond behind my house that I used to sneak in on.”

Nelson also likes to create stuff, especially stuff to make his fishing easier and more enjoyable. .

He has created a product called “StrikeLight” that can be clamped to fishing poles. A light will shine when an angler gets a bite. It's not a new idea, but Nelson says his bite indicator light is not a knock off others that came before it.

Unlike many fishing indicator lights on poles which feature a single exposed bulb, Nelson has designed a light chamber which encapsulates the light and concentrates it into the tip of the device.

A lot of similar products use just one exposed bulb at the tip of the pole, Nelson said. His invention uses two LED bulbs that are protected and shines brighter, he said.

“Instead of just the bulb lighting up, it has cap on the bulb so the whole tip of the StrikeLight lights up,” Nelson said. “It's really easy to see if you are away from your fishing rod or not paying attention.”

Nelson said it's also much easier to change the batteries on StrikeLight than other similar products. Anglers cansimply unscrew a cap on the back like a flashlight and replace two watch batteries.

Nelson came up with the idea for StrikeLight four years ago and built his first prototype with parts he bought at Radio Shack.

“It's been a long process to go from an idea to a drawing to actually having a product,” he said.

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by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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