Nats lose painfully after winning more than usual

Associated Press Published: October 13, 2012
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WASHINGTON (AP) — For their first seven years, filled with on-field losses and off-field gaffes, the Washington Nationals merely existed, barely mattered.

That's why so much that happened in 2012 felt new and significant to them. All the regular-season wins — a best-in-baseball 98 — and the NL East title, the postseason highs and lows, the intense attention to the decision to shut down Stephen Strasburg in September.

And when it ended, in as difficult-to-digest a way as possible, the soft voices in the quiet Nationals clubhouse kept repeating the same word in the wee hours of Saturday, saying they would "learn" from what happened.

Learn from what for nearly every member of a young roster was a debut trip to the playoffs.

Learn from a 9-7 loss to the defending World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals in Game 5 of their NL division series — a game Washington led 6-0 early, then 7-5 with two outs in the ninth inning. So close, yet so far. No team in baseball history had blown a lead of more than four runs en route losing a winner-take-all postseason game.

Manager Davey Johnson: "We proved our worth and we just need to let this be a lesson and ... learn from it, have more resolve, come back and carry it a lot farther."

Closer Drew Storen, who five times threw a pitch while one strike from a victory but each was called a ball: "It's the best job when you're good at it. It's the worst job when you fail. Just got to learn from it."

General manager Mike Rizzo: "Just knowing the character and the makeup of the core guys in this clubhouse, I think we'll use it as a learning tool, as a learning experience, and have a burning desire for it never to happen again. I think in the long run it'll be something that we look back on and say, 'It was an experience, it was a tough experience, but it's one that makes you grow.'"

It was Rizzo who made perhaps the most talked-about personnel move in all of baseball this year, leaving Strasburg off the NLDS roster after making the prized right-hander stop pitching with about 3½ weeks left in the regular season. This was Strasburg's first full season following reconstructive surgery on his right elbow, and Washington wanted to protect him for the future.

"I stand by my decision, and we'll take the criticism as it comes," Rizzo said, "but we have to do what's best for the Washington Nationals, and we think we did."

The feeling around the club is its best days are on the horizon, that winning will now become a regular occurrence. Those 100-loss seasons and worst-in-the-majors finishes in 2008 and 2009? Long in the past, the thinking goes.



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