NBA Finals: Why America loves to sing 'The End' about the Heatles

MIAMI HEAT — Someday the Miami Heat will break up. In the meantime, the Heat will prepare for Oklahoma City and Miami's second straight trip to the NBA Finals, while the rest of the sports world keeps talking about ‘The End'
By JOHN ROHDE, Staff Writer, jrohde@opubco.com Published: June 10, 2012

"Hmmm. The only thing I can think of is we've developed all our young guys from the start," Brooks said with a shrug. "We drafted Kevin (Durant), Russell (Westbrook), James (Harden) and Serge (Ibaka)."

The Thunder's core was born through maturation. The Heat's core was created through manipulation.

As The Heatles play in their second straight Finals, could it be the Thunder that breaks up the band? (Most intriguing scenario: Wade and Bosh to the Lakers for Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bynum.)

When James, Wade and Bosh took center stage on July 9, 2010, to announce they had joined forces, they were asked how many championships they might win. James quickly boasted: "Not two, not three, not four, not five, not six, not seven …"

Could be "not any."

The Beatles broke up far too soon, but had unfathomable success while together. What awaits The Heatles?

Lose in the Finals again and a more appropriate selection might have been the "Traveling Wilburys," which featured Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty and ex-Beatle George Harrison.

That band lasted two years.



TRACING THE BIRTH OF 'THE HEATLES'

On Jan. 3, 2011, the Miami Heat posted a non-descript 96-82 road victory against the even more non-descript Charlotte Bobcats.

It was the Heat's 18th victory in 19 starts and its 11th straight win on the road after a sluggish 9-8 beginning to superstars LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh joining forces.

Other than James (38 points) and Wade (31) scoring 30-plus in the same game for the first time as teammates, the most impressive number that night was 19,233 people showed up at Time Warner Cable Arena to watch the mismatch.

After the game, James revealed, "We call ourselves 'The Heatles' like The Beatles," because of their ability to draw big crowds on the road.

Stealing "Eatles" was nothing new for James, who in 2006 used "The Cleatles" to describe himself, Drew Gooden and Damon Jones while playing for Cleveland.

In 2007, Kevin Garnett used "The Ceatles" to describe himself, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen in their first season with the Boston Celtics.

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