NBA's recent offer could have benefitted Thunder

by Darnell Mayberry Published: November 20, 2011
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The NBA set out on a social-media campaign last week designed to familiarize fans with the league's final proposal for a new collective bargaining agreement.

NBA commissioner David Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver spent part of their Sunday night answering questions on Twitter, and the league posted a minute-and-a-half soundless slide show on YouTube explaining details of the league's offer.

At the end of the YouTube slide show, one final graphic depicted a sample team roster in 2013-14. It was a model payroll structure the league argues can give every team a chance to compete while also affording it the opportunity to make a profit.

Although players ultimately rejected the offer, two significant issues surrounding the Oklahoma City Thunder emerged from that final slide: a possible preview of what Russell Westbrook's extension could look like, and a glimpse of how the Thunder might be able to retain its core.

Under the league's proposal, a team should be able to field a 15-man roster in 2013-14 for $75 million, or the projected luxury tax line annually established to penalize teams that greatly exceed the salary cap.

The sample roster allowed for one “superstar” who earns a maximum salary of $17 million, one “All-Star” at $14 million, a starter at $10 million and two other starters at $8 million a piece. A team's sixth man would earn $5 million, and rotational players seven through 10 would have salaries descending by $1 million starting at $4 million for the seventh rotational player. Players 11-15 would earn $3 million collectively, or $600,000 a piece.

Using that formula, it becomes easy to pencil in the Thunder’s cast. The catch, of course, is nobody knows how high the ceiling of certain Thunder players will be.

But let’s have some fun.

Kevin Durant, who received the maximum allowable extension last year, fills the “superstar” category. By 2013-14, Durant would be in the third year of his five-year deal worth upward of $85 million.

Westbrook, who is eligible for an extension whenever the lockout is lifted, currently is the team's biggest mystery from a payroll standpoint. Still, he clearly will fill the second slot defined as “All-Star.” It's just a question of whether the explosive point guard commands a max contract. If so, that could place the Thunder under an enormous financial burden and potentially squeeze out others. But if somehow GM Sam Presti is able to ink Westbrook for less than the max, the structure remains well intact.

Going off the league's sample, the Thunder could comfortably sign Westbrook to a five-year, $75 million deal. It would give Westbrook an average salary of $15 million starting at $13 million. While it wouldn't be a max deal, it would, by comparison, be $20 million more than Boston point guard Rajon Rondo received.


by Darnell Mayberry
OKC Thunder Senior Reporter
Darnell Mayberry grew up in Langston, Okla. and is now in his third stint in the Sooner state. After a year and a half at Bishop McGuinness High, he finished his prep years in Falls Church, Va., before graduating from Norfolk State University in...
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SAMPLE TEAM ROSTER IN 2013-14

A look at the NBA's model team salary.

PLAYER; SALARY

Superstar (max salary); $17 million

All-Star; $14 million

Starter; $10 million

Starter; $8 million

Starter; $8 million

Sixth man; $5 million

Rotation player; $4 million

Rotation player; $3 million

Rotation player; $2 million

Rotation player; $1 million

11-15) Remaining players; $3 million

*Projected tax level is $75 million

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