New Spring Parade of Homes showcases 96 metro houses

Event chairman Jack Evans, managing partner of TimberCraft Homes, said builders created the spring parade so that buyers could experience the quality, workmanship and ‘individual touches' that go into their homes day in and day out.
BY TIM FALL trfall@gmail.com Published: April 20, 2013

If you're in the market for a new home, you've probably heard this time of year called “spring buying season.”

If you're a homebuilder, when the redbuds pop and the last winter storm blows through, you see the other side of that coin — it's “spring selling season.”

Either way, 'tis the season — and the Central Oklahoma Home Builders Association is celebrating.

Builders are welcoming prospective buyers to the inaugural Parade of Homes Spring Festival, which continues Saturday and Sunday and then again next weekend, April 26-28. Homes are open free to the public from 1 to 6 p.m. each day.

The spring parade showcases 96 homes from 51 builders across the Oklahoma City metro area. For maps and information on Spring Festival homes, go to www.paradeofhomesok.com.

Event chairman Jack Evans, managing partner of TimberCraft Homes, said he and other builders are eager to show buyers their handiwork and craftsmanship.

Evans said builders created the spring parade so that buyers could experience the quality, workmanship and “individual touches” that go into their homes day in and day out. He characterized the annual fall Parade of Homes, now to be called the “Fall Classic,” as a stage for builders' “showcase houses.”

The spring festival features homes built “ready to move in,” Evans said.

The Parade of Homes Spring Festival is the brainchild of Caleb McCaleb of McCaleb Homes in Edmond, and Jim McWhirter, president of Gemini Builders in Del City.

McWhirter, who for years has served as chairman of the springtime East Area Festival of Homes, said he was looking forward to the “experiment.”

“We always see such great foot traffic” in the East Area Festival, he said. McWhirter said he, McCaleb and others are eager to expand a “system that works” to include homes across the greater metro area.