New York landowners win right to renegotiate leases in Chesapeake settlement

Chesapeake has agreed to let more than 4,000 landowners in New York seek more favorable lease terms as part of a settlement with the state's attorney general.
by Jay F. Marks Published: June 15, 2012
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More than 4,400 landowners in New York have won the right to seek more favorable oil and natural gas leases, thanks to an agreement between the state attorney general and a subsidiary of Chesapeake Energy Corp.

New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman heralded the deal on behalf of state landowners.

“Make no mistake about it, this agreement will provide a safety net for thousands of landowners by allowing them the opportunity to negotiate fairer lease terms, both financial and environmental, regardless of their existing contracts,” Schneiderman said. “For landowners across the state, this deal literally will provide a new lease on life.”

The leases had been subject to a “force majeure” claim from Chesapeake Appalachia LLC, which tried to extend their terms amid an ongoing environmental review of natural gas development in New York.

Such claims typically involve uncontrollable circumstances such as natural disasters.

Chesapeake admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement, but the company will pay $250,000 to reimburse the attorney general's office for its investigation of landowners' complaints.

“It is unfortunate that we have been in this situation in New York since 2008, where landowners and their mineral lessees have been unable to develop mineral rights in the Southern Tier despite a robust drilling program being undertaken in neighboring Pennsylvania,” the company said in a statement.

Chesapeake has leased more than 600,000 acres in New York, but the bulk of its holdings in the gas-rich Marcellus Shale are in Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Most of Chesapeake's current operations in the area are focused on liquids-rich areas in southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, as well as the Utica Shale in eastern Ohio.


by Jay F. Marks
Energy Reporter
Jay F. Marks has been covering Oklahoma news since graduating from Oklahoma State University in 1996. He worked in Sulphur and Enid before joining The Oklahoman in 2005. Marks has been covering the energy industry since 2009.
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