Going Green

Going Green News from NewsOK

  • Lead removal to close Edmond museum for several months

    BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    Oklahoma State Department of Environmental Quality officials will close the Edmond Historical Society and Museum force the closure of the museum for several months to remove lead fragments and lead dust in the basement.

  • America's greatest idea

    Tiffany Gee Lewis, Deseret News | Updated: Tue, Aug 11, 2015

    This summer, as our family has traveled the West, we've come to appreciate, more than ever, what Wallace Stegner called America's "greatest idea."

  • How nature heals the brain

    Tiffany Gee Lewis, Deseret News | Updated: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    New studies in mental health find that a simple walk in nature can help heal the brain.

  • Carbon rule gives states leeway to meet climate change goal, EPA chief says

    Chris Casteel | Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    WASHINGTON _ The Obama administration's final rule for reducing carbon emissions at power plants across the nation will be released on Monday and will give states wide latitude to adopt an energy mix and efficiency measures, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Sunday. All of...

  • Oklahoma attorney general sues EPA over added water authority

    BY RANDY ELLIS Staff Writer rellis@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Jul 9, 2015

    Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday in an effort to halt implementation of an agency rule that would expand the EPA's authority to regulate the nation's waters.

  • Exxon knew of climate change in 1981, email says – but it funded deniers for 27 more years

    Published: Thu, Jul 9, 2015

    ExxonMobil, the world’s biggest oil company, knew as early as 1981 of climate change – seven years before it became a public issue, according to a newly discovered email from one of the firm’s own scientists. Despite this the firm spent millions over the next 27 years to promote climate denial....

  • Oklahoma utilities study options after high court's mercury ruling

    By Paul Monies Business Writerpmonies@Oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. and other utilities are studying their compliance options after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 against a regulation designed to cut mercury and other harmful emissions from coal plants. The court said the EPA should have taken compliance costs into account when it...

  • James Curtis, James Nghiem Advance to Finals of OKC's Funniest

    Kelly Flanagan | Updated: Thu, Jun 11, 2015

    James Curtis and James Nghiem punched the first two tickets to the finals of the inaugural Funniest Person in Oklahoma City Contest at the ACM@UCO Performance Lab in Bricktown Wednesday night. The second of six preliminary rounds is at 8 p.m. tonight

  • 10 Animals Whose Fates Rest In Our Hands

    Published: Wed, May 6, 2015

    Our beautiful planet is a diverse and resilient place, filled with countless creatures who stir our hearts and imaginations. But sadly, human activities and the global climate change we're precipitating threaten that diversity and resiliency. In honor of The Huffington Post's 10th...

  • KFOR: Pollution spill kills pond fish, upsets Edmond landowner beyond words

    Published: Fri, May 1, 2015

    EDMOND -- Tuesday afternoon, after a Gastar oil rig leaked a saltwater and oil mixture onto a landowners property, shortly after the operations manager of the facility claimed the damage would be minimal, KFOR reports. Now, just a few days later, the property owner says...

  • Have You Seen This? Hiker catches volcano eruption on camera

    John Clyde, KSL | Updated: Mon, Apr 27, 2015

    Last week, Chile’s Calbuco volcano erupted not once but twice in just 24 hours. A hiker caught the moment of the eruption on camera, and an amazing time-lapse documented the entire thing.

  • Oklahoma Geological Survey closing Leonard seismic observatory out of cost concerns

    BY RANDY KREHBIEL, Tulsa World | Published: Tue, Apr 28, 2015

    LEONARD — After more than a half-century recording the state's every shimmy and shake, the Leonard Geophysical Observatory will close this summer, Oklahoma Geological Survey Interim Director Rick Andrews confirmed recently. "The Leonard Geophysical laboratory is a very old facility," Andrews...

  • Senate sends anti-EPA bill to governor's desk

    BY BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World | Published: Tue, Apr 28, 2015

    The Oklahoma Senate on Tuesday sent Gov. Mary Fallin a bill touted as a means to challenge a pollution rule by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Senate accepted House amendments Senate Bill 676, by Sen. Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, by vote of 38-7, sending it to Fallin’s desk. The...

  • Jane Goodall Says SeaWorld 'Should Be Closed Down'

    Published: Tue, Apr 28, 2015

    NEW YORK -- Jane Goodall wants to see SeaWorld go extinct, says the Huffington Post. The 81-year-old primatologist said whales and dolphins should never be held in captivity, and that the entertainment company known for its orca shows should be shuttered. “They definitely should be closed...

  • Oklahoma business briefs for March 25

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Oklahoma business briefs for March 25, 2015

  • Earthquake town hall in Oklahoma City features regulators, industry and plenty of questions

    Paul Monies | Updated: Fri, Mar 20, 2015

    What to do about the rise in earthquakes in Oklahoma and the possible links to wastewater injection wells from oil and gas activity drew questions Thursday night at a town hall forum in Oklahoma City. Asked to signal their preference by applause, the attendees at Oklahoma City University appeared...

  • Did goose poop cause Grand Lake beach to close? Officials working on lake's water quality

    BY RANDY KREHBIEL, Tulsa World | Published: Wed, Mar 18, 2015

    VINITA — It began with goose poop. Officials think the droppings left by a flock of geese on a Grand Lake beach last Memorial Day weekend, followed by heavy rain, were initially responsible for the elevated waterborne bacteria levels that caused the area to be closed to swimmers from June 3...

  • Training your Landscape to be Drought Tolerant

    Connie Scothorn | Updated: Wed, Mar 11, 2015

    With watering restrictions and news reports on drought, there is a lot of talk about drought tolerant planting and xeriscape design, which is a win-win for a new landscape. Most plants are drought tolerant, but we don’t treat them that way.

  • Tried and True Native Plants to use in the Garden

    Connie Scothorn | Updated: Tue, Mar 3, 2015

    It is always easier to learn from other people’s mistakes—especially in the garden. When planning a native landscape there are thousands of plants that you may not have experience with, so here are a few to try.

  • How to use Native Plants in the Landscape

    Connie Scothorn | Updated: Tue, Mar 3, 2015

    It is well known that native plants do better when used in the landscape; they are better adapted to the environment and more tolerant of soils and weather conditions. But how does one effectively incorporate native plants into the landscape?



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