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Nichols Hills sees first new subdivision in 10 years

Glenbrook Park will have 14 lots, two cul-de-sacs and a pedestrian-friendly greenbelt. It will be less dense and much greener than a neighborhood on the same five acres rejected last year by the Nichols Hills City Council.
by Richard Mize Published: November 10, 2012
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/articleid/3727201/1/pictures/1880552">Photo - Streets were poured this week for Glenbrook Park, a new housing addition under way on the north side of NW 63 between Pannsylvania and Grand avenues in Nichols Hills. Developers say landscaping is next and that the 5 acres should be fully developed and ready for construction in December. <strong>PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND - The Oklahoman</strong>
Streets were poured this week for Glenbrook Park, a new housing addition under way on the north side of NW 63 between Pannsylvania and Grand avenues in Nichols Hills. Developers say landscaping is next and that the 5 acres should be fully developed and ready for construction in December. PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND - The Oklahoman

He said Glenbrook Park gained approval because it will be less dense than a controversial plan, ultimately rejected by the city council last March — with 18 lots compared with Glenbrook Park's 14 — and because the cul-de-sacs will limit traffic. Density and traffic were two of residents' biggest concerns with the plan defeated last year.

“I'm a resident of Nichols Hills,” Loftis said. “At the meetings where all that was occurred, I attended and I thought surely there's a way, planning-wise, to solve this.”

Loftis said he was pleased to have a hand in developing the property. The land stood virtually vacant for years with just an old house that in recent years had been allowed to start deteriorating.

The developers paid $1.85 million for the land in March.

The plan rejected last year would have connected Glenbrook Terrace to the north on the east side, and to the south on the west side, with an S-shaped extension. Glenbrook Park has a green belt where the connecting street was located in the rejected plan.

“You could go play some croquet or throw a football around or something like that,” Loftis said.

by Richard Mize
Real Estate Editor
Real estate editor Richard Mize has edited The Oklahoman's weekly residential real estate section and covered housing, commercial real estate, construction, development, finance and related business since 1999. From 1989 to 1999, he worked...
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