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Correction: WCup-Media story

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 3, 2014 at 2:33 pm •  Published: July 3, 2014
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NEW YORK (AP) — In a story July 2 about how many people followed the World Cup, The Associated Press erroneously reported the source of data on the number of online streams of the World Cup soccer match between the United States and Belgium. The source is Adobe Analytics, not Nielsen.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Nielsen: 21.6 million viewers for Belgium game

Nielsen estimates 21.6 million watched US knockout game against Belgium in World Cup

By DAVID BAUDER

AP Television Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — An estimated 21.6 million people watched Belgium knock out the United States soccer team in the World Cup on U.S. television — an impressive total for a weekday afternoon that almost certainly undercounts how many people actually saw it.

The Nielsen company said Wednesday that 16.5 million people watched the game on ESPN, with 5.1 million more seeing it on the Spanish-language Univision network. In addition, nearly 1.7 million people watched an online stream of the event, according to Adobe Analytics.

The record U.S. television audience for soccer is the 24.7 million who saw the United States play Portugal on June 24, which tied the 2010 World Cup final between Spain and the Netherlands.

The Portugal game took place on a weekend, however, when there were more people with free time available to watch. The U.S.-Belgium game started at 4 p.m. on the East Coast, earlier in other time zones, during a working day.

Nielsen does not measure viewership in bars, offices or other public places. In 2010, ESPN estimated that the stated audience size for weekday World Cup games would increase by 23 percent if public viewing were taken into account.

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