No Kobe on Christmas; says recovery is 'slow'

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 25, 2013 at 8:06 pm •  Published: December 25, 2013
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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Kobe Bryant wasn't happy about spending Christmas Day on the sideline, unable to help the struggling Los Angeles Lakers.

It's a place he's unaccustomed to being on the holiday. Bryant leads the NBA with a record 15 appearances on Christmas Day, but he's out an expected four to six weeks with a fracture in his left knee.

"It's strange to be coming in on Christmas and not playing," he said before the Lakers' 101-95 loss to the Miami Heat on Wednesday. "It's a foreign feeling, but I'm here to support my guys."

LeBron James and Co. have won six in a row, and the Lakers have dropped three straight.

"It's not as special when Kobe's not out there," James said afterward.

Bryant's injury was diagnosed last week, his second major one of the season.

He didn't play his first game until Dec. 8 after nearly eight months away while recovering from a torn Achilles tendon. Then he got hurt again Dec. 17 at Memphis while playing his fourth game in five nights.

"I was fortunate that it was not a meniscus," he said.

Initially, Bryant didn't think he was seriously hurt against Memphis. He went down late in the third quarter, but returned to finish out the victory in which he logged a season-high 21 points in 32 minutes.

"I didn't know it was fractured," he said. "I was expecting a bone bruise more than anything else. I thought (the doctor) was joking when he told me."

Bryant has been limited to riding a bike; he isn't supposed to put any pressure on his knee.

"It's just been slow in terms of laying off it and letting it heal," he said. "When you don't have activity, you got to watch the other parts like nutrition."



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