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No. 3 K-State boasts 111-0 edge in points off TOs

Associated Press Modified: November 8, 2012 at 3:47 pm •  Published: November 8, 2012
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Heisman Trophy candidate Collin Klein, who is expected to play Saturday after sustaining an apparent head injury, has only thrown two interceptions while steering clear of turnovers by tucking the ball and running rather than throwing into coverage.

"Running the options, if anything's real scary out there, then they're not pitching it," Patterson said. "They'll just take what they get, or whatever happens, get to the next play."

"They're real consistent. They don't really make too many mistakes," TCU cornerback Jason Verrett added. "Their quarterback is real good, he's real patient."

On the other side of the ball, the emphasis is on creating turnovers through a willingness to take chances on making a play. Defensive back Allen Chapman may get beaten occasionally, but he also picked off three passes against the Cowboys, returning one of them for a touchdown.

In practice, the priorities are the same.

The Wildcats focus on making scenarios as realistic as possible, with the No. 1 offense often going against the first-team defense in an attempt to recreate the speed of the game.

Running back Angelo Pease never saw a scout team defense continually try to strip the ball from the offense in practice before he came to Kansas State.

"When I was in JUCO, we didn't do it. When I was in high school, we didn't do it," Pease said. "Our scout team goes hard. They try to intimidate the other team, stripping the ball and going hard. I think that helps us."

The 10 minutes of ball security drills that running backs and tight ends endure every practice also helps. Fail the drill once, a player might get away with repeating it. Let it happen again and there will be repercussions, especially if the ball goes on the ground in live practice.

"You'd probably be running, probably doing push-ups, something like that," Pease said. "Every time you fumble the ball it's like, 'What if you were in the game?'

"We try to treat everything like a game situation," he said. "If you fumble in the game, that one turnover could be the cause of losing or winning the game, so we take it very seriously."