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Nolan wins; Minn. gay marriage ban, voter ID lose

Associated Press Modified: November 7, 2012 at 2:16 am •  Published: November 7, 2012
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"The last four years have been crap," said Marvin Grover Cleveland, 73, of Roseville, who voted for Romney. "It's the economy. It went downhill. The debt has gone up so far. ... Let's try something else."

Rene Maas, an over-50-year-old business analyst from Plymouth, voted for Obama, saying he needs more time.

"I think he's made great strides and he's really trying to get us moving in the right direction. It's not going to be an instant change," she said. "You can't recover an economy fast. It's going to take a while. It took a while to get into the mess."

While interest in the race between Obama and Romney was high, it was outstripped in intensity by the campaigns for and against the amendments.

Opponents of the marriage amendment outraised supporters by about two-to-one. But backers had history on their side: No gay marriage ban had ever been defeated at the hands of any state's voters.

Photo ID requirements for voters are spreading through the country, but only Mississippi had one enacted through a constitutional amendment process.

Dale Charboneau, 66, a self-employed designer and artist in Roseville who said he was an independent, voted for Obama and against the gay marriage ban. But Charboneau supported photo ID, recalling the state's close 2010 governor's race and allegations of fraud.

"It's a small percentage, but in an election like this, it could be enough to change it," Charboneau said.

Terri Montbriand, 53, a medical secretary in Bloomington, followed the same path: for Obama, against the gay marriage ban, and for photo ID.

"I guess I didn't think it was difficult to have to show an ID," Montbriand said.

Minnesota historically ranks among the nation's leaders in participation, and Secretary of State Mark Ritchie projected 3 million voters — a number that would approach 80 percent of eligible voters.

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Associated Press writers Amy Forliti, Steve Karnowski, Patrick Condon and Doug Glass contributed.