Norman man threatens Oklahoma Gov. Fallin's 'child' and local sheriff in emails

A Norman man threatened via email to kill Gov. Mary Fallin's “child” and McClain County Sheriff Don Hewitt, apparently because he is upset about the death of his own child, court records show.
by Andrew Knittle Modified: June 17, 2013 at 10:11 pm •  Published: June 18, 2013
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A Norman man threatened, via email, to kill Gov. Mary Fallin's “child” and McClain County Sheriff Don Hewitt, apparently because he is upset about the death of his own child, court records show.

Scott Neil Helling was charged last week in Cleveland County with two felonies for using a computer to threaten the lives of Fallin's unnamed child, Hewitt and a McClain County sheriff's deputy.

Helling, who told investigators he sent the emails from the Norman Public Library, was arrested June 7 on “unrelated warrants” and booked into the Cleveland County jail. His bail has been set at $20,000, records show.

Josh Dean, an investigator with the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, wrote in an affidavit that Helling believed Hewitt “was responsible for killing his son as well as stealing $65,000 worth of firearms from him.”

According to court records, Helling believed the sheriff was holding the guns at a barn near Wayne.

“Helling wanted to point a gun at Hewitt and place him under citizen's arrest,” Dean wrote. “If Sheriff Hewitt ‘flinched' after Helling pointed his gun at him, then Helling was going to shoot and kill him.”

Helling, who apparently is angry with the Purcell Police Department, as well, has been arrested numerous times this year, including three times for public intoxication in McClain County.

Less than two weeks ago, three people sought protective orders against Helling in McClain County.

Dean wrote in the affidavit that Helling had been trying for months to draw attention to his “case” without success.


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by Andrew Knittle
Investigative Reporter
Andrew Knittle has covered state water issues, tribal concerns and major criminal proceedings during his career as an Oklahoma journalist. He has won reporting awards from the state's Associated Press bureau and prides himself on finding a real...
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