North Texas hosting another Super Bowl in five years? Good luck with that

It doesn't look like Cowboys Stadium will host the Super Bowl again in five years after a week of blunders, columnist Jenni Carlson writes.
by Jenni Carlson Modified: February 8, 2011 at 9:06 am •  Published: February 7, 2011
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ARLINGTON, Texas — Our good friends in North Texas want the Super Bowl back in five years, want to host the biggest spectacle in sports again, want to be the site of the game's momentous 50th anniversary.

Good luck with that.

The dress rehearsal for Super Bowl L didn't go so well this past week.

Super Bowl XLV?

More like Blunder Bowl.

Everything that could go wrong did. Some of it was out of anyone's control — who could've foreseen not one but two snowstorms rolling through the Dallas-Fort Worth area on Super Bowl week? — but plenty of other things were man-made disasters.

“Any time you're putting on an event of this magnitude, you have your challenges,” NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said during a day-after press conference. “We've had them this week.”

Not exactly a ringing endorsement.

Things got off to an ominous start from the beginning. The Metroplex was hit by the same snowstorm that walloped Oklahoma early in the week. While the snowfall wasn't as significant as Oklahoma City or Tulsa, folks south of the Red River don't quite know what to do with the white stuff.

When a second wave of winter rolled through Friday, it nearly crippled the city.

The NFL can't blame the weather on anyone. When it picked JerryWorld for the Super Bowl, the league knew it was taking a chance with the North Texas weather. Still, the NFL will think twice about putting the game here again because of how much it impacted everything that's part of Super Bowl week.

Snow and ice sliding off the stadium's retractable roof and injuring a few folks didn't help matters either.

With all the bad stuff going on outside, Jerry Jones and Co. had to be looking forward to the action moving inside Sunday where the climate was controlled.

Then came Seatgate.

Temporary seats in four midlevel sections inside the stadium weren't set up properly. The NFL called it “incomplete installation,” but everyone else called it a complete mess.

The seats were unusable and left about 1,250 fans without anywhere to sit.

About 850 were relocated to other seats. The league always holds back a few Super Bowl tickets in case there's a problem, and some NFL and Dallas Cowboy staffers gave up tickets to accommodate the seatless.

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by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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