NTSB: Plane battery that burned not overcharged

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 20, 2013 at 2:37 pm •  Published: January 20, 2013
Advertisement
;

There are so many redundancies and safeguards in aviation that when an accident or mishap occurs, it almost always is the result of a chain of events rather than a single failure, he said.

The Japan Airlines plane caught fire Jan. 7 while it was sitting on the tarmac at Boston's Logan Airport. In a separate incident on Jan. 16, an ANA flight made an emergency landing in western Japan after a cockpit message warned of battery problems and a burning smell was detected in the cockpit and cabin. An investigator in Japan said Friday that the burned insides of the plane's lithium ion battery show the battery received voltage in excess of its design limits.

Since then, all 50 787s that Boeing has delivered to airlines' fleets have been grounded, and the manufacturer has halted deliveries of new planes until it can address the electrical problems.

The batteries in two incidents "had a thermal overrun because they short-circuited," Goglia said. "The question is whether it was a manufacturing flaw in the battery or whether it was induced by battery charging."