NW 10 exit ramp redesign along Interstate 235 draws concerns about pedestrian access, development impact in Oklahoma City

A plan for a new NW 10 exit ramp along Interstate 235 is facing resistance by Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority board members who question whether it will hamper pedestrian access and continued development of the Oklahoma Health Center.
by Steve Lackmeyer Published: July 19, 2012
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A plan for a new NW 10 exit ramp along Interstate 235 is facing resistance by Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority board members who question whether it will hamper pedestrian access and continued development of the Oklahoma Health Center.

The project calls for the authority to provide easement along the east side of I-235 just south of NW 10, and for the state Transportation Department to free up other nearby land under its control for ongoing development of the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park.

The design, if approved, will do away with what is known as a “button hook” northbound exit ramp that currently takes traffic onto the Harrison Avenue bridge into downtown. New ramps would provide direct access to both eastbound and westbound NW 10. The buttonhook ramp, meanwhile, would be replaced by what is referred to as a “Texas turnaround” that maintains driver access to Harrison Avenue.

A pedestrian corridor, in current designs, would be created between the NW 10 exit ramp and the Texas turnaround.

The new ramp was sought out by city leaders as part of a 2003 agreement aimed at keeping St. Anthony Hospital in MidTown. But Urban Renewal commissioners, led by Chairman Larry Nichols, questioned whether all objectives were being met with the proposed design.

“The question is, have we really made the hospitals happy, which I'm all for,” Nichols said. “But are we also restricting access to downtown, and pedestrian access and future development?”

Fellow Commissioner Jim Tolbert noted the city is trying to improve pedestrian access along NW 10, which links St. Anthony Hospital with the Oklahoma Health Center.


by Steve Lackmeyer
Reporter Sr.
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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