NYPD oversight plans vetoed; override vote due

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 23, 2013 at 5:50 pm •  Published: July 23, 2013
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NEW YORK (AP) — Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Tuesday vetoed the most ambitious plan proposed in years for oversight of the New York Police Department, setting up an override showdown between him and lawmakers.

Bloomberg's long-expected veto puts the proposals on course for their possible revival in an override vote later this summer. The measures would create an outside watchdog for the department and more latitude for lawsuits claiming discriminatory policing.

The latest in a decades-long history of efforts to impose more outside oversight on the nation's biggest police force, the legislation crystallized from concerns over the NYPD's use of stop-and-frisk tactics and its widespread surveillance of Muslims, spying that was disclosed in stories by The Associated Press.

But the mayor said in veto messages that the measures are "dangerous and irresponsible." As he and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly have before, Bloomberg argued that the legislation would undermine safety by deluging the department in lawsuits and inquiries, making officers hesitant to act for fear of coming under scrutiny, and undercutting policing techniques that have cut crime dramatically in recent years.

Civil rights advocates and other proponents say the measures will make the city safer by repairing frayed trust between police and citizens who feel unfairly targeted by stops and surveillance.

"We will not be deterred by false accusations or fear-mongering," City Councilmen Brad Lander and Jumaane Williams, who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement. Bloomberg's "actions have embarrassed this city and this country," the statement said.

The legislation was passed in June while a federal judge was weighing a decision in a civil rights lawsuit over the stop-and-frisk practice. It attracted national attention among civil rights groups, and NAACP President Benjamin Jealous was among the spectators in the City Council chambers for the late-night vote.

The legislation would give people more latitude to sue in state court if they felt they were stopped because of bias based on race, sexual orientation or certain other factors. The suits couldn't seek money, just court orders to change police practices. Another provision would establish an inspector general with subpoena power to explore and recommend, but not force, changes to NYPD practices.

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