Obama orders Minnesota to cut emissions 41 percent

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 2, 2014 at 8:53 pm •  Published: June 2, 2014
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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota, which already successfully lowered carbon emissions and capitalized on renewable energy sources, must cut carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 41 percent over the next 15 years as part of a sweeping plan President Barack Obama announced Monday to reduce pollution from power plants.

Obama's plan calls for a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions nationwide by 2030, when compared with 2005 levels. It sets different goals for each state, and some that rely heavily on coal won't have to make as many reductions. Minnesota is one of nine states told to reduce their 2012 levels by more than 40 percent, to help meet the nation's overall reduction goal.

Officials with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, utilities and environmental groups were still reviewing the proposed rules Monday and didn't have specifics on the impact for Minnesota. But they agreed the rules will help the environment and the economy — and that Minnesota is well-positioned going forward.

"We're pretty confident that Minnesota is in pretty good shape," said David Thornton, assistant commissioner for air policy at the MPCA. "We've already been doing this stuff for several years now. We've got renewable energy. We've got many efforts underway to reduce the amount of energy people use."

"... We know how to do it," he said.

"Whatever they're asking, we're going to meet it," said Minnesota Sen. John Marty, D-Roseville, adding that the state would create more jobs and a cleaner environment in the process.

In the 645-page plan, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cited Minnesota's work in reducing emissions. In 2007, the state Legislature created a standard that requires at least 25 percent of all electricity generated or purchased in Minnesota to come from renewable energy by 2025. Just last year, the Legislature expanded that, requiring that an additional 1.5 percent of retail electricity come from solar energy by 2020.

Thornton said the systems already in place will make it easier for Minnesota to meet the new rules.