Obama, Romney answer audience's questions in town hall debate

President Barack Obama and presidential candidate Mitt Romney challenged each other in their second of three debates three weeks before Election Day.
By STEVE PEOPLES and DAVID ESPO Modified: October 16, 2012 at 10:45 pm •  Published: October 16, 2012
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President Barack Obama criticized Mitt Romney's economic blueprint in a town hall style debate Tuesday night, accusing his rival of favoring only a “one-point plan” to help the rich at the expense of the middle class. The Republican protested the charge was way off the mark.

The truth, Romney said, is that “the middle class has been crushed over the last four years.” It was the first of repeated highly charged moments of the 90-minute debate, the second of three between the campaign rivals three weeks before Election Day in a close race for the White House.

The president was feistier from the outset than he had been in their initial encounter two weeks ago, when he turned in a listless performance that sent shudders through his supporters and helped fuel a rise by Romney in opinion polls nationally and in some battleground states.

Obama challenged Romney on economics and energy policy, accusing him of switching positions and declaring that his economic plan was a “sketchy deal” that the public should reject.

“You'll get your chance in a moment. I'm still speaking,” Romney said at one point while Obama was mid-sentence. He said the president's policies had failed to jumpstart the economy and crimped energy production.

The open-stage format left the two men free to stroll freely across a red-carpeted stage, and they did. Their clashes crackled with energy and tension, and the crowd watched raptly as the two sparred while struggling to appear calm and affable before a national television audience.

The rivals disagreed about taxes, measures to reduce the deficit, energy, pay equity for women and health care issues. Immigration prompted yet another clash, Romney saying Obama had failed to pursue the comprehensive legislation he promised at the dawn of his administration, and the president saying Republican obstinacy made a deal impossible.

Audience poses questions

Under the format agreed to in advance, members of an audience of 82 uncommitted voters posed questions to the president and his challenger.

Nearly all of them concerned domestic policy until one raised the subject of the recent death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya in a terrorist attack at an American post in Benghazi.

Romney said it took Obama a long time to admit the episode had been a terrorist attack, but Obama said he had said so the day after in an appearance in the Rose Garden outside the White House.

When moderator Candy Crowley of CNN said the president had in fact done so, Obama said, “Say that a little louder, Candy.”

One intense exchange focused on competing claims about whether energy production is increasing or slowing. Obama accused Romney of misrepresenting what has happened — a theme he returned to time and again. Romney strode across the stage to confront Obama face to face, just feet from the audience.

Both men pledged a better economic future to a young man who asked the first question, a member of a pre-selected audience of 82 uncommitted voters.

Then the president's determination to show a more aggressive side became evident.

Rebutting his rival's claim to a five-point plan to create 12 million jobs, Obama said, “Gov. Romney says he's got a five-point plan. Gov. Romney doesn't have a five-point plan. He has a one-point plan. And that plan is to make sure that folks at the top play by a different set of rules.”

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