OKC Memorial Marathon: Security remains a priority for law enforcement

The Oklahoma City Police Department, Oklahoma City Fire Department, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office, and Oklahoma City Public Works Office will all be involved in a security plan enforced by more than 250 law enforcement personnel.
by Trent Shadid Published: April 20, 2014

As a result of the Boston Marathon bombing, Oklahoma City area law enforcement was forced to put together an expanded security plan in just 13 days for last year’s Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon.

This year, while authorities say the threat level isn’t as high, security at the April 27 marathon will remain extensive.

“Once the Boston Marathon incident occurred, that changed the way we are going to provide security for any future marathon here in Oklahoma City,” said Oklahoma City Police Department Major Steve McCool. “I’m not sure that anyone ever felt like a marathon would or could be a target. After the Boston Marathon incident, obviously that changed our way of thinking.”

The Oklahoma City Police Department, Oklahoma City Fire Department, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office, and Oklahoma City Public Works Office will all be involved in a security plan enforced by more than 250 law enforcement personnel.

“It’s not just the police department, it’s a collaborative effort from a lot of different agencies to be able to put together an extra layer of security for the marathon,” McCool said. “It wouldn’t be possible without so many agencies willing to lend some help.”

The extra level of security includes police detectives monitoring social media sites, a bomb squad doing sweeps before the marathon even starts, and a uniformed officer at every water stop and every relay station.

“Our security plans have evolved just like our race,” said Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum security director Leon Gillum. “It started with a few thousand people and has grown up to about 27,000 this year, so the security plan evolved along with it. We’ve got the same plan in place that we’ve always had, but now we have a security overlay that we’ve developed as a result of what happened in Boston.”

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by Trent Shadid
Copy Editor
Trent Shadid is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Weatherford, Okla., and attended Weatherford High School. Before joining The Oklahoman, he spent two seasons as an assistant wrestling coach at Weatherford High...
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