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OKC Thunder: Could Perry Jones help slow down the Spurs?

COMMENTARY — Second-year forward was effective in a regular-season matchup against LeBron James and the Heat. Could he be the same player in the Western Conference Finals?
by Jenni Carlson Published: May 20, 2014


photo -  
                 OKC's Perry Jones, left, defends Houston's Dwight Howard during a game earlier this season. With starter Serge Ibaka out, Jones could be called upon to provide a defensive boost against San Antonio in the Western Conference Finals. 
                   
                 
                 
                   Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman
OKC's Perry Jones, left, defends Houston's Dwight Howard during a game earlier this season. With starter Serge Ibaka out, Jones could be called upon to provide a defensive boost against San Antonio in the Western Conference Finals. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman

SAN ANTONIO — Scott Brooks kept trying different combinations Monday night. Three point guards at the same time. Kevin Durant at center. Even Jeremy Lamb got to dust off his Nikes and play.

But despite all the experimenting, Perry Jones wasn’t included.

A guy who was able to stay in front of LeBron James pretty well during the regular season wasn’t given a shot against a Spurs team that has no forward nearly as good the Miami menace. Jones is athletic and long. That could’ve helped on the defensive end, where the Thunder struggled mightily, and as a bonus, it could’ve helped the Thunder run, run, run and attack, attack, attack the aging Spurs.

But not until the Spurs had thoroughly torched the Thunder and were up big in the fourth quarter did Jones get some garbage minutes. Leaving him on the bench was as much of a head scratcher as any of the unorthodox lineups that Brooks tossed on the court.

I’m not knocking the Thunder coach for throwing some things against the wall to see if they’d stick in Game 1. Lose a mainstay like Serge Ibaka right before you face the well-oiled black-and-silver machine in San Antonio, and experimentation is necessary, even if it’s in the Western Conference Finals.

But why not give Jones a go?

I asked Brooks that question after the Thunder finished up practice Tuesday afternoon.

“There’s only 240 minutes” Brooks said of the playing time available in every NBA game. “You can’t play everybody. It’s not a league that everybody gets an opportunity.”

I’m not asking for everybody to get a chance. I’m asking for Jones to get one.

The Thunder struggled mightily on defense in the series opener. Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili combined for 59 points, which isn’t great but is a total the Thunder could stomach. But giving up 16 points to Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green? Allowing Boris Diaw to score nine second-half points? Those are the kind of things that’ll kill you.

Tell Jones to go out there, lock in one of those guys and see what happens.

That’s what Brooks did earlier this season against the Heat. Of course, the guy he told Jones to lock in on was LeBron. Seemed like a tall order, but Jones’ defense on James helped turn an 18-point deficit into a 25-point lead and an eventual 17-point shellacking. With Jones on the court, the Thunder was able to exploit the Heat’s aging roster with spry legs and superior length.

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by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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