OKC Thunder: Why has the Thunder's offense gone away from Serge Ibaka late in games?

Thunder hasn’t gotten the ball to its big man for shots late in games.
by Anthony Slater Published: April 25, 2014

— With 30 seconds left in Thursday night’s pivotal Game 3, Russell Westbrook curled around a bruising Kendrick Perkins screen, before rising up and missing a potential game-tying 3-pointer

But as Westbrook readied to launch, both of the Grizzlies’ big men had mistakenly fired out to the 3-point line to help. And left – without anyone within 15 feet of him – was Serge Ibaka, by his lonesome for what should have been an easy dunk.

It was a microcosm (and screenshot seen around the Internet world) of the Thunder’s recent offensive problems.

Westbrook’s intentions were fine. Decent look with a chance to tie the game. But it was an unnecessary home-run play when far better options were clearly available. The uncovered dunk would have cut Memphis’ lead to one with more than 24 seconds left on the clock.

But within the play, another pressing issue was highlighted. During the Thunder’s first three playoff games, Serge Ibaka’s offensive impact has been reduced. And it’s not because a lack of effectiveness, but rather a lack of opportunity.

Ibaka’s lofty shooting percentage has remained steady. He’s 18-of-30 overall in the series. But he’s only averaging 10 shots in his 40 minutes per game, down from his more than 12-shot average in 32 minutes a night during the regular season.

“With Serge, he’s gonna get opportunities,” coach Scott Brooks said. “We’re well aware of his touches and we need to get him more looks.”

The absence of Ibaka has been particularly evident late in games.

In the 34 combined fourth quarter and overtime minutes the past two games, Ibaka has been on the court for 28 of them. In that time, he’s only taken one shot.

Durant has taken 21. Westbrook has taken 25.

He’s one of the league’s best mid-range jumpshooters — an established and improving scorer who has stretched his range out to the 3-point line — basically being treated like a defensive specialist with the game on the line.


by Anthony Slater
Thunder Beat Writer
Anthony Slater started on the Thunder beat in the summer of 2013, joining after two years as NewsOK.com's lead sports blogger and web editor. A native Californian, Slater attended Sonoma State for two years before transferring to Oklahoma State in...
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