Oklahoma baseball: Sunny Golloway wasn't Sooners' most beloved coach, but he got results

While the Auburn faithful are fired up about Sunny Golloway being lured away, the OU faithful have given the move a collective shoulder shrug. But even with a lack of warm fuzzies with Golloway, it's still surprising that the Sooner Nation is so blasé about his departure.
by Jenni Carlson Published: June 16, 2013

Sunny Golloway leaving Oklahoma caused no outrage in the Sooner Nation.

No wailing. No gnashing of teeth. No renting of garments.

Granted, we're talking about the baseball coach in Norman, not the football coach. But still, while the Auburn faithful are fired up about Golloway being lured away, the OU faithful have given the move a collective shoulder shrug.

“Is it weird that I'm totally OK with this?” one reader commented on the NewsOK.com story announcing Golloway's departure.

Is it weird?

Maybe.

Is it surprising?

Definitely.

Now, it's true that Golloway wasn't the most beloved coach in the world. There were some players and coaches with ties to OU who refused to have anything to do with the program as long as Golloway was the coach.

Right or wrong, they had their reasons for feeling that way, and it created a cloud over the program.

Then, there was the high-profile brouhaha between Golloway and his nephew Kody Kaiser in 2006.

Kaiser decided to leave the program after starting for two years but having ongoing issues with his uncle. He sought a full release from OU to transfer.

Golloway blocked it, meaning Kaiser wouldn't be immediately eligible at another NCAA Division I school.

At the time, Kaiser contended that his uncle was more interested in his image than his players, even a blood relative.

“He said to me, ‘If you leave the University of Oklahoma, how am I going to recruit to the University of Oklahoma when my own nephew doesn't want to be here?'” Kaiser said.

Kaiser transferred to Oklahoma City University, believing he could move to a lower-division school and be eligible, but when fall practices rolled around, he was told that OU still had no plans to release him. Even though he was playing for an NAIA team that would never cross paths with the Sooners, he would have to wait until the spring to be eligible.

Did Golloway have every right to block the release?

Sure.

Did it look good for him to be fighting his nephew like that?

Not at all.

But even with a lack of warm fuzzies with Golloway, it's still surprising that the Sooner Nation is so blasé about his departure.

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by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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