Oklahoma-based retailer Hobby Lobby reiterates its objection on contraception issue

Hobby Lobby and its owners reiterated Wednesday that the company's objection to providing insurance coverage for some forms of birth control is based on its religious beliefs.
by Don Mecoy Published: November 1, 2012
Advertisement
;

Hobby Lobby and its owners on Wednesday rejected the government's claim that it is a secular organization, and therefore must offer employees insurance coverage that pays for contraception the owners call “abortion-causing drugs and devices.”

David Green, founder of the Oklahoma City-based retailer, his family and the company sued in Oklahoma City federal court in September to block the federal government from requiring the company to provide insurance coverage for contraception devices such as the “morning-after pill,” “week-after pill” and some kinds of intrauterine devices.

They are asking U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton to prevent the government from enforcing new health care rules on their business “and other individuals and organizations that object on religious grounds to providing insurance coverage for abortion-causing drugs and devices and related education and counseling.” A hearing on a preliminary injunction request is set for Thursday.

The company on Wednesday responded to a government filing in the case that argued the owners cannot raise religious objections to the preventive services coverage regulations because Hobby Lobby is a for-profit, secular corporation.

“The government cannot label people or organizations as ‘secular' or ‘religious' and grant or withhold freedom accordingly,” the company's attorneys wrote. “The law simply protects the exercise of religion — whether the Greens practice it in their church, in their home, or in running their business.”

The Greens run their companies, Hobby Lobby and Mardel, under a statement of purpose that includes “operating the company in a manner consistent with Biblical principles.” Their stores close on Sunday, offer chaplain services to their employees and broadcast Christian music among other demonstrations of the owners' religious beliefs.


by Don Mecoy
Business Editor
Business Editor Don Mecoy has covered business news for more than a decade after earlier working on The Oklahoman's city, state and metro news desks, including a stint as city editor. He has won state and regional journalism awards for business,...
+ show more


The government cannot label people or organizations as ‘secular' or ‘religious' and grant or withhold freedom accordingly. The law simply protects the exercise of religion — whether the Greens practice it in their church, in their home, or in running their business.”

Hobby Lobby's attorneys

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Report: TCU star Devonte Fields a suspect in domestic disturbance call
  2. 2
    Gary Williams thinks Kevin Durant will settle down in Washington D.C. area one day
  3. 3
    Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher explains why Jameis Winston went unpunished
  4. 4
    Former Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein joins Wildcats football staff
  5. 5
    Native American tribe cancels Ted Nugent show, cites 'racist' views
+ show more