Oklahoma basketball: Going Division I finally puts low-key North Dakota State in the athletic spotlight

by Berry Tramel Published: March 18, 2014

SPOKANE, Wash. — Thursday will be a big day for the North Dakota State basketball team.

The Bison are in the NCAA Tournament, playing the Sooners at 6:27 p.m. Thursday, and a state with perhaps the lowest athletic profile of the Lower 48 takes another step up the recognition ladder.

But heck, Tuesday was a big day for the Bison. They flew a charter plane from Fargo to Spokane.

That’s no small thing after a season of bus rides across the northern Plains and commercial flights through Chicago and Minneapolis during this winter of miserable weather.

“We’ll be traveling in relative style to what we’re used to,” said North Dakota State coach Saul Phillips.

Relative style describes the status for all of North Dakota. The NCAA Tournament puts the low-key state in an athletic spotlight it avoided for many years.

“The perception of North Dakota is … either glaciers or tumbleweeds,” said Phillips. “You say Fargo, North Dakota, the first visions people get is the wood chipper from the movie.”

Yep, the 1996 movie “Fargo” is to North Dakota what “The Grapes of Wrath” was to Oklahoma in the 1940s. Then along came Bud Wilkinson, and Rodgers & Hammerstein, and something will come along in North Dakota.

Maybe it already has. Seven years ago, North Dakota State went Division I. Since then, its football team has won three NCAA I-AA national titles, and last August, the Bison beat Kansas State. In 2009, the North Dakota State basketball team made the NCAA Tournament and played Kansas tough in a regional opener in Minneapolis, losing 84-74.

Now the Bison are back, with an even better team. NDSU is 25-6, champion of the Summit League and a 12-seed in the NCAA West Regional.

Sports have provided a lasting image for various American outposts. Oklahoma and Alabama football. North Carolina and Indiana basketball.

North Dakota has been far behind in that regard. Until recent years, the Dakotas and Alaska were the only states with no Division I teams in football or basketball.

The University of North Dakota has long been a Division I hockey power, but hockey is a niche sport. Only football and basketball move the needle for national recognition.

Phillips arrived in Fargo when the debate raged on whether the Bison should compete at a higher level. Phillips said the argument against went this way: “Why would we want to go Division I? All we’re going to do is get kicked in the teeth.”

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by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The Oklahoman,...
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