Oklahoma basketball: Ryan Spangler's hard-earned toughness sets tone for Sooners

That toughness was born growing up the son of a high school football coach who now works the oil fields. It was strengthened being the youngest of three boys — Spangler's older brothers both played college football.
by Ryan Aber Published: February 21, 2014
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— The last time Ryan Spangler went against Kansas State, he came out of the game with a bloodied scratch on his neck, courtesy of a Wildcats defender.

“They've got to do something to get him off the boards,” teammate Cam Clark said. “That's not going to faze him, getting scratched or elbowed. He's still going to go and that's what we need from him.”

Spangler also came out of that game with 21 points and 14 rebounds, further cementing his place as the player who sets the tone for Oklahoma, especially defensively.

The Sooners lost that game, though. Saturday, they get another chance at the Wildcats, hosting Kansas State at 3 p.m. at Lloyd Noble Center.

If Oklahoma wins this time, there's a good chance Spangler will have plenty to do with it and there's a good chance his grit inside will come into play.

“If we didn't have that, I don't know where we'd be,” Sooners coach Lon Kruger said. “Ryan's affected everyone's physicality, their toughness. That's been contagious to the rest of the team.”

That toughness was born growing up the son of a high school football coach who now works the oil fields. It was strengthened being the youngest of three boys — Spangler's older brothers both played college football.

“They always used to beat me up when I was younger,” Spangler said. “And when I was little, if I wasn't being tough — if I cried — they would always gripe at me and try to get me better.”

And then it was honed throughout the last three years, first as a two-sport star at Bridge Creek, then as a freshman at Gonzaga, and now in Norman.

In the 2011 Class 4A state title game, Spangler got a rare game against players who matched his size. Douglass' Marquis Buxton-Hill was 6-foot-9, brothers Romond and Ramond Jenkins 6-foot-6.

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by Ryan Aber
Reporter
Ryan Aber has worked for The Oklahoman since 2006, covering high schools, the Oklahoma City RedHawks, the Oklahoma City Barons and OU football recruiting. An Oklahoma City native, Aber graduated from Northeastern State. Before joining The...
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