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Oklahoma cancer center to begin clinical trial to treat brain tumors

Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation in Oklahoma City are working with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma to begin the first phase of clinical trials to treat an aggressive type of brain tumor.
by Jaclyn Cosgrove Modified: August 7, 2013 at 1:00 pm •  Published: August 7, 2013
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After years of research, scientists in Oklahoma City are partnering with an Oklahoma cancer center to begin the first phase of clinical trials to treat an aggressive type of brain tumor.

Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have developed the experimental treatment after several years of researching how to treat glioblastomas, a type of brain cancer that kills many of the people who develop it.

Starting this month, doctors at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma will collaborate with OMRF to begin Phase I of a clinical trial for the treatment.

Dr. Scott McMeekin, who is in charge of clinical trials at the cancer center, said this is the first time the cancer center has partnered with the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

“The amount of work that it has taken to get to this point is huge,” he said. “People don't recognize how much has gone into studying and identifying all of it. It looks like ‘Oh, you're just starting,' but we're at a midway point, and there has been a huge amount of work. This kind of homegrown agent that's being identified and developed by a local researcher is clearly something that's very exciting for Oklahoma.”

Dr. Rheal Towner, a scientist at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, is one of the researchers who developed the experimental treatment for the cancer.

Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of primary brain tumors, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Towner said there isn't a cure for glioblastomas, and there aren't many treatment options for the people who develop them. The tumors are known to develop rapidly, with people who develop glioblastomas living an average of 15 months.

Towner said the treatment for glioblastomas involves compounds known as nitrones. Through Towner and fellow OMRF researcher Robert Floyd's work, the researchers found nitrones can be effective in reducing cancer tumors in rats and mice.

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by Jaclyn Cosgrove
Medical and Health Reporter
Jaclyn Cosgrove writes about health, public policy and medicine in Oklahoma, among other topics. She is an Oklahoma State University graduate. Jaclyn grew up in the southeast region of the state and enjoys writing about rural Oklahoma. She is...
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