Oklahoma City Barons: Hybrid icing rule being tested in AHL

Barons defenseman Taylor Fedun probably would not have suffered broken femur if rule existed last season.
by Michael Baldwin Published: October 22, 2012
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photo - AHL HOCKEY: Oklahoma City's Colten Teubert (33) skates during a game between the Oklahoma City Barons and the San Antonio Rampage at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Friday, Oct. 19, 2012.  Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Oklahoman
AHL HOCKEY: Oklahoma City's Colten Teubert (33) skates during a game between the Oklahoma City Barons and the San Antonio Rampage at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. Photo by Garett Fisbeck, The Oklahoman

At the request of the NHL, the American Hockey League is testing “hybrid icing” the first five weeks of the season.

If hybrid icing was in effect last year, Barons defenseman Taylor Fedun probably would have made his debut with the Edmonton Oilers or least started his pro career in Oklahoma City.

Instead, Fedun (pronounced feh-doon) missed the entire season after he suffered a shattered femur last year in an NHL preseason game. In an attempt to beat Fedun to the puck, Minnesota's Eric Nystrom placed his stick between Fedun's skates near the end boards.

“It was terrifying at the time,” Fedun said. “I had never broken a bone in my body up to that point. (My femur) kind of exploded into a bunch of different pieces.”

Fedun had a titanium rod and four screws placed in his right leg. Two screws were placed near his hip. Two other screws were placed near his knee. He spent a year rehabilitating the injury.

Minnesota's Kurtis Foster suffered a similar injury four years ago on a similar play, which is why hockey officials are studying a rule used by the NCAA.

Under current NHL icing rules, players race for the puck to the end boards, sometimes leading to collisions and potentially catastrophic injuries. If the defenseman touches the puck first, it's icing. If the forward touches the puck first, play continues.

The hybrid rule has a linesman make a judgment call as to who would win the race for the puck at the offensive faceoff zone dots.

“Injuries that occur from touch-icing plays can be pretty bad injuries,” said Fedun, who experienced hybrid icing while at Princeton. “If you institute the hybrid rule, I think you would still get a lot of the benefits but minimize the high-velocity impact into the boards.”

NHL officials have discussed hybrid icing the past six years. For the first time they're seriously considering implementing the change after general managers endorsed the rule last spring.

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by Michael Baldwin
Reporter
Mike Baldwin has been a sports reporter for The Oklahoman since 1982. Mike graduated from Okmulgee High School in 1974 and attended Oklahoma Christian University, graduating with a journalism degree in 1978. Mike's first job was sports editor...
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