Oklahoma City man who dismembered his mother gets more treatment, scrutiny

by Andrew Knittle Modified: June 28, 2014 at 10:00 pm •  Published: June 28, 2014
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An Oklahoma City man who killed his mother and cut up her body will remain in custody and be closely watched by mental health workers for the foreseeable future.

Gerald David Hume appeared Friday morning in Cleveland County District Court, nearly two months after a judge declared him not guilty by reason of insanity in the gruesome murder of his mother, Janet Kay Hume, 77.

District Judge Lori Walkley considered two reports on Hume and his mental conditions Friday during a brief hearing in her courtroom.

In her office after the hearing, Walkley told The Oklahoman she declared that Hume, 54, was a threat to public safety and that he needed further treatment for his mental health issues.

Walkley said state law requires a judge to consider two reports from psychiatrists after a person is found not guilty by reason of insanity — and then the future of the individual is decided.

“One of the reports found (Hume) to be in need of treatment, but also that he was not a danger to the public,” the judge said.

Walkley said she did not agree with that assessment of Hume.

“He’s in custody now and he’s being given his medication,” she said. “So, he’s not a danger as long as he’s medicated...but what if he doesn’t take his medication?”

Sam Talley, Hume’s attorney, has said that Hume wasn’t taking his medication at the time of his mother’s murder. He said Hume “had no history of violence that had been documented in the legal system.”

“At the time of the offenses, because he wasn’t taking medication, he was legally insane,” Talley said during a recent phone interview. “You can tell he has mental health issues, but he was found to be competent (after he was medicated in jail).”

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by Andrew Knittle
Investigative Reporter
Andrew Knittle has covered state water issues, tribal concerns and major criminal proceedings during his career as an Oklahoma journalist. He has won reporting awards from the state's Associated Press bureau and prides himself on finding a real...
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