Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon: Airman to run half-marathon in full uniform, 168-pound pack

by Ed Godfrey Modified: April 24, 2012 at 1:14 pm •  Published: April 24, 2012
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photo - Memorial Marathon runner Brendan Brustad poses for a photo with his weighted backpack at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum on Monday, April 23, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  Brustad will carry 168 pounds in his pack as he runs that marathon. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman
Memorial Marathon runner Brendan Brustad poses for a photo with his weighted backpack at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum on Monday, April 23, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Brustad will carry 168 pounds in his pack as he runs that marathon. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

The next year, Brustad broke the world record by running the most miles on a treadmill in 168 hours.

“A lot of people don’t know there are 168 hours on a treadmill,” he said.

That world record was later broken so Brustad reclaimed it 2010. Last year, he helped pace a friend in his first Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon.

And Brustad is not done yet. In fact, he wears a band around his wrist with just that reminder.

His tribute to the bombing victims this year will be his most physically challenging task yet. Brustad’s Air Force training has required him to run with weighted packs before, but never more than 100 pounds.

He also wants to set 19 different world endurance records this week that involved running on a treadmill and other exercises with weighted packs.

Brustad’s 2-year-old daughter, Kiersten, is his ultimate inspiration for doing something in memory of the 19 children killed in the bombing.

“These 19 children will have a record in their name,” he said. “I am just hoping I can do the best I can for them.”

No matter how physically exhausting Sunday will be for Brustad, it doesn’t compare to the emotions that overcome him each year during the marathon.

“This takes a lot more out of me emotionally than it does physically,” he said. “It goes back to those 168 seconds of silence. It just ignited something in me to do something for the memorial and for the victims.”

by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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