Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon runners have access to real-time tracking

Devices supplied by US Fleet Tracking, and available for rental to runners, allow friends and family to keep up with runners. The devices update the runners’ locations every 10 seconds.
by Trent Shadid Published: April 12, 2014
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US Fleet Tracking typically works with any mobile workforce that you can imagine, from flower delivery to long-haul trucking.

The GPS tracking manufacturer is expanding its capabilities with this year’s Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon on April 27 by offering all participants the chance to run with a tracking device.

“The Oklahoma City Marathon is something we’ve always supported along with other fitness events like it,” said US Fleet Tracking founder and CEO Jerry Hunter. “There are all kinds of different applications for it, but because it’s live, you can get on the web and see it as it moves. For the marathon, it’ll be up to date every 10 seconds. At this point it’s also for children, a spouse, parents and people like that just wanting to know how someone is doing. Also, being able to go back and look at your own performance has value with this.”

The trackers can be rented for $25 when participants register for the marathon at okcmarathon.com. Included with the tracker is a belt that holds the device and is free of charge.

“As we know of, our marathon seems to be the only one where anyone can be able to get a tracker like this,” said Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon running liaison Mark Bravo. “We may approach somewhere around 100 people who chose to use it this year. But it’s kind of unprecedented in the manner we offer it.”

The trackers are quite the advancement from similar technology typically used in marathons. For instance, pads on the course and tracking chips worn around the ankle or on the shoes have been used to show when a runner has crossed a certain point in the event. However, these pads are typically spaced out about every six miles.


by Trent Shadid
Copy Editor
Trent Shadid is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Weatherford, Okla., and attended Weatherford High School. Before joining The Oklahoman, he spent two seasons as an assistant wrestling coach at Weatherford High...
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