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Oklahoma City officials, Downtown Business Improvement District work on deal to cover damage in The Underground tunnels

No one claims ownership of the underground pedestrian tunnels that traverse downtown Oklahoma City, but an agreement is being drafted that may cover catastrophic damages including flooding and earthquake damage.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: August 20, 2014 at 10:02 pm •  Published: August 21, 2014
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photo - 
The Underground (formerly the Conncourse) is seen. Oklahoma City and the downtown improvement district are uncertain who will pay for repairs due to catastrophic damage. Photo by David McDaniel, The Oklahoman
  David McDaniel - 
The Oklahoman
The Underground (formerly the Conncourse) is seen. Oklahoma City and the downtown improvement district are uncertain who will pay for repairs due to catastrophic damage. Photo by David McDaniel, The Oklahoman David McDaniel - The Oklahoman

No one claims ownership of the underground pedestrian tunnels that traverse downtown Oklahoma City, but an agreement is being drafted that may cover catastrophic damages including flooding and earthquake damage.

The Downtown Business Improvement District, managed by Downtown Oklahoma City Inc., has assumed responsibility for the tunnels’ upkeep and improvements since the 1999 collapse of the original operator, the Metro Conncourse Association.

Then-Mayor Kirk Humphreys and the city council declined to own the system, which was built through a winding series of agreements and easements involving downtown property owners, civic leaders and the city in the early 1970s.

Downtown Oklahoma City Inc.’s budget, however, did not include funding to address the catastrophic flooding that has hit the central business district each of the past two years.

A.J. Kirkpatrick, director of operations at Downtown Oklahoma City Inc., was tasked with sorting through the questions and finding a solution. Digging through boxes of old records, Kirkpatrick said he was able to determine the tunnels were built for $1.3 million in 1974. That information, Kirkpatrick said, is important to potential insurers in calculating replacement costs.

“Maybe this conversation happened 50 years ago and we don’t know,” Kirkpatrick said. “But it needs to happen now.”

The tunnels connect many of downtown’s major properties, spanning from Sheridan Avenue to NW 5, and from Broadway to Hudson Avenue. On nice days the tunnels are bare, but on harsh weather days the tunnels are used by thousands.

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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Underground story shows deep roots

The Underground, previously known as the Conncourse, was opened in 1974 under the guidance of Jack Conn, chief executive officer of Fidelity Bank.

Conn and other major civic leaders worked out an agreement that provided for 15 major property owners whose buildings connected to the tunnels to pay for the system's maintenance and operation. Revocable permits were issued by the city to the Oklahoma Industrial Authority to build the system.

The agreement worked until the 25-year contracts and permits expired in 1998. At that point those who backed the creation of the tunnels, and most of the institutions they represented, had disappeared during the 1980s oil bust.

To make matters more confusing, portions of the tunnels cross under buildings and are owned by those property owners. Other portions of the tunnels pass under city, county and federal properties.

A couple of the tunnels, most notably one that crosses under Hudson Avenue and connects to the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, were never finished and opened.

Some representatives of the Conncourse Association argued the tunnels were owned by the city and it was obligated to take them over. Then-Mayor Kirk Humphreys denied responsibility. To this day, no one claims ownership of the tunnels.

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