Oklahoma City Philharmonic revisits the nostalgic era of the Carpenters

The Oklahoma City Philharmonic took audiences on a nostalgic journey with a tribute to the music made popular by Karen and Richard Carpenter.
Modified: March 25, 2013 at 4:39 pm •  Published: March 26, 2013
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Carter scored points with her tasteful rendition of “Solitaire,” which also featured a fine orchestral arrangement. And while the singer's voice doesn't possess the same timbre as Karen Carpenter's, she shared the same alto range as her famous counterpart. Carter also took the lead in what may be the duo's biggest hit, Leon Russell's “Superstar.”

Burleigh-Bentz zeroed in on the poignant lyrics of “Bless the Beasts and the Children,” a reminder that “The world can never be the world they see. Light their way when the darkness surrounds them, and give them love, let it shine all around them.”

Vocally, Trones was the evening's standout, his warm, resonant voice a perfect fit for such hits as “For All We Know,” “There's a Kind of Hush” and “Goodbye to Love.” His natural stage presence also allowed him to forge an immediate connection with the audience.

Joining their voices in combination, the singers reminded us that not all of the Carpenters' hits were wistful ballads. There was the upbeat Beatles' hit “Ticket to Ride,” the country-inflected “Top of the World,” the Cajun-inspired “Jambalaya” and the childlike appeal of “Sing.” Douglas Droste skillfully handled the orchestral accompaniments and lent the singers tasteful support throughout.

It's interesting to note that as we age, nostalgia plays an increasingly important part in our collective memories. This enjoyable concert proved that it was indeed possible to relive “Yesterday Once More.”

— Rick Rogers