Oklahoma City police's new homeless outreach team represents a new approach to homelessness

The Oklahoma City Police Department’s new homeless outreach team is designed to connect Oklahoma City’s homeless population with housing and other services in the hopes of getting them off the street. The team represents a new way of addressing the city’s homeless problem.
by Silas Allen Modified: March 30, 2014 at 9:00 am •  Published: March 30, 2014
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As he picked his way through a tent city lining a creek bed Thursday afternoon, Oklahoma City police Lt. Bobby Thompkins called out to see if anyone was there.

No one answered. It’s common to find the homeless camp just north of General Pershing Boulevard empty in the middle of the afternoon, Thompkins said. Most of the people who stay there go to day shelters during daylight hours, then come back to the encampment at night, he said.

Police have known about the camp for about a year. But it’s likely people have been staying there longer than that. Now, the department is trying a new way of working with the city’s homeless population.

“We’re finding we can’t arrest our way out of it,” Thompkins said. “We need to try something else.”

Thompkins and two other officers — Staff Sgt. Clinton Garst and Master Sgt. Paul Camacho — make up the department’s new homeless outreach team. The team is designed to connect Oklahoma City’s homeless population with housing and other services in the hopes of getting them off the street.

The team represents a new way of addressing the city’s homeless problem, Thompkins said. In the past, officers routinely arrested homeless people for minor violations. Those people were fined for those violations and, when they failed to pay the fine, they ended up in jail.

“It was just kind of a vicious cycle of costing taxpayers money,” he said.

The department launched the team last month as a pilot program. The three officers, who are all on special assignment from the Bricktown bicycle patrol unit, visit homeless camps and speak with the people there. Officers explain that they aren’t there to arrest people at the camps for minor violations or check for active warrants. They offer to take them to homeless shelters or help them get other services.

People are generally reluctant to speak with officers or accept help at first, Thompkins said. Many of them don’t trust police, or they don’t want to change the way they live. It can often take as many as 50 visits before officers convince a person to accept help, he said.

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by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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