Oklahoma City show house takes guests on musical journey

The 39th annual show house, the apex of the Oklahoma City Orchestra League's year and fundraising activities, will be open to the public 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday until May 20.
BY DYRINDA TYSON dyrinda@gmail.com Published: May 12, 2012
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Guests making their way through this year's Symphony Show House aren't just on a tour — they opt to go on a Musical Mystery Tour, as well.

Designers have incorporated a musical element into each room of the freshly redecorated Jazz Age Manor at 440 NW 15 in Heritage Hills. Those who want to play along can note on an entry form as they go through for a chance to win two nights at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City or four box seats at an Oklahoma City Philharmonic performance next season. Winners will be chosen from the correct entries May 19.

Michelle Winter, spokeswoman for the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, which organizes the Symphony Show House, said it's a brilliant refinement of the traditional scavenger hunt.

“That's one of the ideas behind this show house, to support music,” she said.

Musical Mystery Tour

The 39th annual show house, the apex of the Oklahoma City Orchestra League's year and fundraising activities, will be open to the public 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday until May 20. Tickets are $15 at the door or can be purchased online at www.symphonyshowhouse.com.

The Musical Mystery Tour is new this year, and Debbie Minter, show house co-chairman, said it adds a fresh element to the tour.

“What we've found is it's really causing everyone to take a step back and really look at the room,” she said.

And there's a lot to take in with a tour area covering two floors, a basement, outdoor areas and what once was a carriage house out back.

The stately English-style mansion was built in 1925, the year F. Scott Fitzgerald published “The Great Gatsby” and unleashed the “roaring '20s” sensibilities on the literary world. Age and wear were beginning to catch up with the old house by the time thoracic surgeon Marvin Peyton and his wife, Sandra, bought it in 1983.

According to the show house guide book, the Peytons spent three years restoring its arched windows and slate roof, replacing wooden floors, renovating a bathroom and the master suite, enclosing a sun porch, revamping the landscaping and adding amenities such as a pool and spa.

And then, right after showing off their work in a neighborhood home tour, a faucet leak flooded the home and forced them to do some of the work all over again.

The Peytons lived in the house 28 years, raising two children there, before putting it on the market in 2011 and moving to smaller, more manageable quarters in Edmond.

“I'm excited to see what it's going to be,” Sandra Peyton said as designers prepared to move in and get to work in February. “I can't say it's not sentimental for us to leave, but we know we've made the right decision.”



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