Oklahoma City Thunder: MVP announcement becomes mother's day for Mama Durant

Tuesday afternoon, Kevin Durant gave us an even more intimate look behind the curtain at the relationship that he has with the woman everyone has come to know as Mama Durant. There would be no KD without Mama D.
by Jenni Carlson Published: May 6, 2014

Kevin Durant has never been shy about his love for his mama.

He goes to her courtside seat after games and gives her a kiss. He hugs on her. He dotes on her. And he’s never minded if an arena full of people or a national television audience saw his affection.

But Tuesday afternoon, Durant gave us an even more intimate look behind the curtain at the relationship that he has with the woman everyone has come to know as Mama Durant.

There would be no KD without Mama D.

On a day that was supposed to be all about Durant and his latest but greatest piece of hardware — the NBA’s granddaddy of them all, the Most Valuable Player award — the Thunder superstar somehow made the event about everyone but himself. He talked about each of his teammates individually. He thanked everyone from Clay Bennett to Sam Presti to Scott Brooks, but he also took time to recognize behind-the-scene folks like Marc St. Yves, the Thunder’s director of team operations.

All the while, Durant was emotional. He cried. He sniffled. He didn’t try to stop any of it.

But he nearly broke down completely several times as he talked about his mom.

“When something good happens to you,” he said, “I don’t know about you guys, but I tend to look back to what brought me here.”

He stood at a podium inside the Thunder’s old practice facility, filled Tuesday afternoon with a thousand dignitaries and fans, but he looked straight at his mom sitting on the front row. They might as well have been the only two people in the room.

“I don’t think you know what you did,” he said.

Wanda Pratt had her first child, Tony, when she was 18 years old. Three years later, she had Kevin.

Living in Prince George County just outside Washington, D.C., the three of them moved around a bunch. Durant recounted one of his best childhood memories on Tuesday as the day that they moved into their first apartment.

“No bed. No furniture,” he said. “And we all just sat in the living room and hugged each other.

“We thought we had made it.”

Stability was rare. Security was lacking. Just making it from one day to the next was a struggle.

“It felt like a box,” Durant said. “It felt like there was no getting out.”

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by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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