Oklahoma City Thunder: Russell Westbrook's 'full game' comes at right time

JENNI CARLSON COMMENTARY — Thunder point guard has another Game 7 triple-double to help push OKC past Memphis and into the second round.
by Jenni Carlson Published: May 3, 2014

Russell Westbrook loves him some Game 7.

He has played in only two of them in his career, but in both, he’s had a triple-double. The only other players in NBA history who can say they’ve had a triple-double in a Game 7 are Jerry West, Larry Bird, James Worthy, Scottie Pippen and Rajon Rondo.

Pretty tall cotton there.

But only two of those guys did it twice. Westbrook and Rondo are the only men in history who can claim that grand feat.

On a night when the Thunder defeated the Grizzlies 120-109 to wrestle a series victory away from a feisty bunch from Memphis, Westbrook was the catalyst. As much as Kevin Durant’s return to form in the last two games of this series was a necessity, the Thunder becomes a nearly unbeatable team when Westbrook plays this way. Heady. Controlled. Aggressive.

Down right masterful.

Westbrook’s line: 27 points, 10 rebounds, 16 assists.

And he threw in two steals and one tomahawk-off-the-rim block of a Tony Allen shot.

After the game, I asked Memphis coach Dave Joerger about Westbrook’s impact on the Thunder in the final two games of the series, a pair of must-win games for Oklahoma City, and before he answered, he took a moment to try and answer Westbrook’s critics, of which there are still many.

“I have no idea why he takes the flack that he takes,” Joerger said. “This man can play. He’s one of the most talented people in the league.

“It’s unfathomable.”

But really, the way Westbrook played Thursday in Memphis and Saturday in Oklahoma City is one of the reasons that people criticize. They see the greatness. They watch the mastery. And they wonder why it isn’t always that way, why there are those out-of-control moments and shoot-too-soon possessions.

Thing is, games like Saturday are becoming way more common than the other.

“He was aggressive without being out of control,” Joerger said. “He was able to find some guys on the perimeter, hit them in the hands, and guys felt comfortable hitting those shots.”

Westbrook struck a great balance between facilitating for others and working for himself. As a guy who can get his own shot, it’s not always easy to toe the line between the two. But after the first five games of this series, Westbrook knew that he had to be more forceful.

More aggression, less settling.

He shot 38 3-pointers in the first five games combined, and many of them came early in the shot clock.

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by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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