Oklahoma City University will honor alumni

Oklahoma City University will recognize 10 outstanding alumni during the Distinguished Alumni Awards Luncheon at noon Nov. 3.
BY ROD JONES Published: October 20, 2012
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The Oklahoma City University Alumni Association will honor 10 alumni during the Distinguished Alumni Awards Luncheon at noon Nov. 3 in the University Center.

Tickets are $20 and can be bought by calling Cary Pirrong at 208-5463 or emailing alumni@okcu.edu.

The honorees

Deborah S. Fleming, class of 1977, most recently served as vice president and treasurer of SemGroup Corp. and Rose Rock Midstream in Tulsa. She joined SemGroup in 2010 and was responsible for refinancing the company after it emerged from a complex bankruptcy.

Fleming received a bachelor's degree in finance from OCU and an MBA in finance from the University of Tulsa. She has served as an adjunct finance professor at OCU's Meinders School of Business, teaching on campus and at the Great Wall MBA Program at the Tianjin University of Finance and Economics in China.

Paul D. Fleming, class of 1976, has been chief internal auditor for BancFirst Corp. for seven years. He is certified as an internal controls auditor, fiduciary and investment risk manager and is a member of the Institute of Internal Auditors.

He received a bachelor of science in economics and received the David DeLorme Award, given to the top economics graduate. He earned an accounting degree from the University Center of Tulsa in 1995.

He has served on the Meinders School of Business Executive Advisory Board since 2008. He retired from the U.S. Navy after 20 years.

U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom, class of 1981, is a 1977 graduate of Kansas University and a graduate of OCU School of Law. At OCU, he was a member of the Law Review, the Moot Court Board and the Order of the Barristers.

From 1986 to 2010 he was a member of the board of governors for the Kansas Trial Lawyers Association. He was nominated for U.S. Attorney for the District of Kansas in April 2010. Before his confirmation, he practiced law as a solo practitioner, specializing in employment discrimination claims.

Donald “Don” Jordan, class of 1980, is a 35-year veteran of professional theater. He has worked as an artistic director, director, stage manager, scene and properties designer, scenic painter, production manager, technical director, actor and stand-up comic. His performing credits include touring in leading roles with the national, international and California companies of the Broadway hit “42nd Street” and off-Broadway in CityRep's “Out at Sea.”

Serving as Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre's founding artistic director, he oversees all aspects of the theater's operations.

Jordan earned a bachelor's degree in theater from OCU and an MFA in theater from Trinity University.

Timothy Long, class of 1990, is an Oklahoma-born musician who has enjoyed success as a conductor, chamber musician and collaborative pianist. Long, of Muscogee Creek and Choctaw descent, grew up playing many instruments. He studied piano and violin at OCU and completed graduate studies in piano performance and literature at the Eastman School of Music.

His piano performances include recitals with soprano Jennifer Aylmer, mezzo-soprano Susanne Mentzer, tenor Vinson Cole, baritone William Sharp and on NBC's “Today Show” with tenor Salvatore Licitra.

Long is in his first season on the New York City Opera conducting staff and will conduct Britten's “The Turn of the Screw” at Stony Brook Opera. He will make his main stage conducting debuts at Boston Lyric Opera in Rachel Portman's “The Little Prince” and at Opera Theatre of St. Louis conducting performances of “Rigoletto” and Gounod's “Romeo and Juliette.”



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