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Oklahoma City veteran saw a different side of World War II

Howard Briney, of Oklahoma City, served as a motor pool driver during World War II.
by Matt Patterson Modified: July 4, 2014 at 10:00 am •  Published: July 4, 2014
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When Howard Briney was called up to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II, it was in many ways a relief for the Oklahoma City resident.

Briney, now 96, had spent the first few years of the war working at the Midwest Air Depot, which later became Tinker Air Force Base. He worked for Douglas Aircraft as a sheet metal worker. With a wife and young child at home, and working in an industry critical for national defense, Briney was given a deferment by the War Department.

But the deferment came at a price. When he went out in public with his wife, Aletha, and their daughter, Sue, it was often an uncomfortable experience.

“Daddy would not go anywhere with our mom because everyone stared at him,” his daughter, Donna VanHorn, said. “He thought they were wondering, ‘Why are you still here when my loved ones and friends are already gone?’”

The call eventually would come and Briney found himself on a troop transport with hundreds of other frightened soldiers from small towns nobody ever heard of and big cities that would come to define parts of the United States. He was miserable, but happy to serve.

“I had lemon drops,” he said. “That’s the only thing that kept me from getting seasick. There were people just as green as gourds hanging over the side of the ship.”

The bulk of Briney’s service from 1944 to 1946 was behind the wheels of jeeps and trucks. He hauled everything from supplies to generals and saw plenty along the way during his travels through France, Germany and Belgium.

Disturbing scenes

It was in Belgium where Briney saw some of the most disturbing images of the war in the aftermath of the Battle of the Bulge.

“I never saw any combat, but I’ve been to a lot of different places where there was. The Battle of the Bulge was the worst part I saw. I saw a lot of different areas where they had bombed everything but nothing like that. There was nothing left.”

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by Matt Patterson
Reporter
Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun....
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“I never saw any combat, but I’ve been to a lot of different places where there was. The Battle of the Bulge was the worst part I saw. I saw a lot of different areas where they had bombed everything but nothing like that. There was nothing left.”

Howard Briney

Briney is a World War II veteran

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