Oklahoma City woman who claims uncle was infamous skyjacker says she passed FBI polygraph test

An Oklahoma City woman who claims an uncle was the infamous skyjacker D.B. Cooper said Thursday she passed an FBI polygraph test about her memories of the case. Marla Cooper says she will donate money from book to benefit veterans.
BY NOLAN CLAY nclay@opubco.com Published: August 5, 2011

An Oklahoma City woman who claims an uncle was the infamous skyjacker D.B. Cooper said Thursday she passed an FBI polygraph test about her memories of the case.

“It was nerve-racking,” Marla Cooper, 48, said.

She said she was questioned for more than five hours at the FBI office in Oklahoma City in January.

“I was not hooked up to a machine that whole time, but, yeah, there was a long period of questioning … a lot of digging into what I remembered,” she told The Oklahoman. “Then, there was the actual test where they asked the questions again and again and again and again. … They asked the questions several different ways.”

She said the FBI “wanted to make sure, too — beforehand — that I recognized the consequences, that if I was lying to them that I would probably be prosecuted for it.”

An FBI spokesman in Oklahoma City said Thursday he could not confirm she was given a polygraph test.

Marla Cooper is a sales executive for a coffee company. She said she has lived in Oklahoma since she was 15.

Story draws attention

Her claim of being the niece of the infamous skyjacker attracted worldwide attention Wednesday.

In a series of media interviews, she has claimed uncles L.D. Cooper and Dewey Cooper were planning something very mischievous before Thanksgiving 1971 at her grandmother's house in Oregon. She said, early Thanksgiving morning, she saw the uncles again. She said L.D. was badly injured. She said she was told he had hijacked a plane. She was then 8. Both uncles are now dead.

She told The Oklahoman on Thursday, “I remembered my father admonishing me that I could not tell anybody what I had seen. That it was a matter of life and death. And that my uncles had done something extremely foolish.

“A week after the incident, I went to my dad very secretly and said, ‘Can I tell this at show-and-tell that uncle L.D. hijacked an airplane, that he's a hijacker?' And he said, ‘No, of course, you can't.' And again sat with me and gave me a really long lecture about that. So I didn't. I never spoke about it.”

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